Welcome to DefenceTalk.com Forum!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

US Navy News and updates

Discussion in 'Navy & Maritime' started by AegisFC, Jul 3, 2008.

Share This Page

  1. iugim

    iugim New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does anyone know if the Burkes they produce after the restart will continue the block IIa or will it be a modified Design, blockIII? What modifications do you expect?
     
  2. bd popeye

    bd popeye Defense Professional Verified Defense Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2005
    Messages:
    688
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Iowa
    The USN is leading the way in the Haitian relief effort . Now called..Operation Unified Response.

    Just type in Haiti in the search block on the upper right side of the page below for some awesome photos of Operation Unified Response!

    USN Photos
     
  3. t68

    t68 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2006
    Messages:
    3,436
    Likes Received:
    107
    Location:
    NSW
    I was reading an article on another matter and came across links about President Ronald Reagan back in the 80’s ( i was only in high school at the time) and his ambitious expansion of the military and Navy to an incredible six hundred fleet strong fleet, obviously this is not just front line surface ships but capability across the board.

    With increase in Nimitz class carriers and the introduction of the Ohio class Ballistic missile boats, new Aegis combat systems on the Ticonderoga class and recommissioning of Iowa class battleships it must have been an exciting time to be in the Navy.

    Having a look thru the net i could not find a definite answer, how close did the Navy get to the magical 600 mark, obviously this could not be sustained in the long run it could have possible backfired on the US and it’s economy and it is quite possible why the US has a record deficit from over extending the military in the past.

    With China set to rise in the next 25 years or so and challenge the US in not only economic and military strength could the US sustain another rapid growth in the military or has it extended itself to far now?
    As for manning levels did the US use conscript or all volunteer personnel ?
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2010
  4. F35Owns

    F35Owns New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2009
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    China will not surpass the U.S. Economically or Military. China's asset bubble will burst way before then. You thought the 2008-2009 market crash was bad, well the one in 2011-2012 will be 10x worst. Trust me, you haven't seen nothing yet.
     
  5. Salty Dog

    Salty Dog Defense Professional Verified Defense Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2008
    Messages:
    799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Brazil
    Indeed the 1980´s were an exciting time to have served in the US Navy. I recall the recommissioning of the Iowa class battleships and my destroyer was the 1st on the east coast to get Tomahawk missiles.

     
  6. Salty Dog

    Salty Dog Defense Professional Verified Defense Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2008
    Messages:
    799
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Brazil
    Take a look at the near, mid, and far term plans for US Navy Vessel Construction.

    Report to Congress on
    Annual Long-Range Plan for Construction of
    Naval Vessels for FY 2011
     
  7. EngineerScott

    EngineerScott New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Altoona Pa
    USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN gets X-47B

    USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN, At Sea (NNS) -- Personnel from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System (N-UCAS) program team and industry partner Northrop Grumman Corporation are underway with USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) to test the integration of existing ship systems with new systems that will support the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D).

    This effort will reduce program risk and is one of many steps toward the X-47B's first carrier arrested landing or "trap."

    The X-47B will be the first unmanned jet aircraft to take off and land aboard an aircraft carrier. With a 62ft wingspan and length of 38ft, the X-47B is about 87 percent the size of the F/A-18C aircraft currently operating aboard Navy aircraft carriers.

    The UCAS-D effort is focused on developing and demonstrating an aircraft carrier (CV) suitable, low observable (LO) unmanned air system in support of persistent, penetrating surveillance, and penetrating strike capabilities in high threat areas. The effort will evolve technologies required to conduct launch, recovery, and carrier controlled airspace (CCA) operations and autonomous air refueling (AAR) of an LO platform. By FY13, the Navy plans to achieve UCAS CV demonstration; achieve hybrid probe & drogue (USN style) and boom/receptacle (USAF style) AAR demonstration; and evaluate and identify technologies supporting future naval capability requirements.

    Mark Pilling, a former naval flight officer with operational unmanned aircraft experience, is the team's mission operator. He and his team are charged with verifying mission operator software between the ship and aircraft.

    "This is the first step in the X-47B's integration into the carrier's systems," said Pilling.

    The team is testing X-47B software integration by using a King Air turbo prop "surrogate" aircraft taking off and landing from shore. As the aircraft approaches the carrier, it performs the same types of procedures as manned aircraft. However, since the X-47B is unmanned, digital messages from shipboard controllers will be used to control the aircraft instead of verbal instructions. In response to the digital command and control messages, the plane's software confirms, complies and sends a "wilco" signal back to the controllers and mission operator.

    "Over the last two at sea periods on Lincoln, we have integrated into a number of the ship systems, from PriFly, to CATCC, to the LSO platform," said Pilling.

    Janice Stolzy, the Northrop Grumman project lead, is on board to verify that the prototype equipment works in a real-time operational environment. Stolzy said successful UCAS-D system testing on Lincoln will set the stage for additional developmental testing later this year, including testing the software integration using an F/A-18 surrogate aircraft to more closely emulate the X-47B's flight path.

    John Zander, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) lead test engineer, said a prime benefit of a UCAS concept is to reduce the risk to human pilots.

    "This is an important milestone for the Navy and we're making great strides on board Lincoln," said Zander.

    Additional UCAS-D development activities are underway at multiple NAVAIR and Northrop Grumman sites throughout the United States. First flight of the X-47B is expected later this year.



    X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Taking Shape On Board Lincoln


    new ball game:D
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 18, 2010
  8. plasmahawk

    plasmahawk New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    very cool, I am impressed, these birds will change the way that a Carrier task force operates, with a longer time in the air per sortie, it will be a game changer for sure.

    Although I just about had a conniption fit, because I am becoming dumber and dont read captions:

    100215-N-0000X-001 WASHINGTON (Feb. 15, 2010) An artist's conception of the X-47B long-range unmanned aerial vehicle on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier. The Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration program will demonstrate the capability of an autonomous, low-observable unmanned aircraft to perform carrier launches and recoveries. (Photo illustration courtesy Northrop Grumman/Released)​

    -- Anyway, lets see some in flight and landing photos and videos of this baby!
    Cant wait.
    Plas
     
  9. AegisFC

    AegisFC Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2006
    Messages:
    2,036
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Virginia
    Your title is misleading. The Lincoln didn't launch or recover any X-47B's, just some personnel to test the systems and do some simulations.

    Also merging with existing USN thread.
     
  10. Twickiwi

    Twickiwi New Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    Like eggs attacking each other with hammers

    I was a little shocked to hear a panel discussion with John Arquilla and Victor Davis Hanson suggest that super-carriers are now becoming so costly and vulnerable to new counter measures that they may become like Battleships.

    The crux of their argument is that a handful smart mines and super fast torpedoes could cripple an US Navy task force by taking out the capital ships. The effort required to protect 100k+ tonnes of super carrier is making the admittedly awesome strike capability uneconomic. They argue that having 100k+ tonnes of amphibious airstrike capability in several hulls makes the task force more able to survive battle losses, cheaper, safer and more cost effective. A question of not having all your eggs in a single basket I guess.

    This is inneressing, but without a shooting war in the Taiwan straits it is difficult to see how the contention can be tested. Admirals LIKE BIG BOATS and they cannot lie...

    [nomedia="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ao1rZkylLfI&feature=player_embedded"]YouTube- New rules of war with Hanson and Arquilla[/nomedia]
     
  11. F-15 Eagle

    F-15 Eagle New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2007
    Messages:
    1,296
    Likes Received:
    1
    John Arquilla and Victor Davis are idiots then who do not understand national defense. The cost of protecting a 100k+ ton is most defiantly worth the cost.
     
  12. Twickiwi

    Twickiwi New Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    The issue isn't whether its worth having the strike capacity of a current super-carrier in a task force, but whether its better to have that capacity in 2 or 3 hulls. The RAND corporation and Annapolis would probably disagree with assessment of Messers Arquilla and Hanson.
     
  13. Sea Toby

    Sea Toby New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2006
    Messages:
    2,473
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just who are Arquilla and Hanson? What expertise do they bring to the panel? Do they have any more credibility than the comic strip Mutt and Jeff?

    Who do you think I trust more, experienced naval aviators admirals or civilian pencil pushers?

    The simple truth confirmed by new aircraft carrier construction worldwide provides some clues to the relationship of carrier size to aircraft carried...
     
  14. Twickiwi

    Twickiwi New Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't want to turn this into me defending the credentials of two guys I saw on a youtube discussion, so I give in. Super-carriers rule man. Yeehaa. Get along there little doggee.
     
  15. Juramentado

    Juramentado New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Eastern Seaboard N.A.
    Qualifications - Hanson and Arquilla

    Taken from Hoover(dot)org website:

    Victor Davis Hanson

    Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He is a classicist and an expert on the history of war. A regular contributor to National Review Online and many other national and international publications, he has written or edited sixteen books, including the New York Times bestseller Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power. His most recent book is A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spartans Fought the Peloponnesian War. He was awarded a National Humanities Medal by President Bush in 2007.

    John Arquilla

    John Arquilla is a professor of defense analysis at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, where he has taught in the special operations curriculum since 1993. He is the author of a number of books, including Worst Enemy: The Reluctant Transformation of the American Military. Dr. Arquilla’s most recent publication is an article in the current issue of Foreign Policy entitled “The New Rules of War.”

    So - to misquote everyone's favorite vigilante cop - "Dirty Harry" Callahan - opinions are like fourth points of contact - everyone's got one. However, just because they lack credentials driving flattops or fighters doesn't mean their opinion is not valid. :)
     
  16. Belesari

    Belesari New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2010
    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA,TN
    Well heres the question. How much would it cost to replace all out super hornets and all the other aircraft with F35s sence that seems to be the crutch here.
    No more E-3s No more big birds with lost o firepower. And is it cheaper in manpower to operate 3 to 4 ships instead of one supercarrier.

    V.D.H.- Seems to know alot politicaly but i dont know how much he knows of Naval combat.

    And the other guy sounds like one of those SEALS CAN DO EVERYTHING! type of people. But hey i wont know till i get more info. so......
     
  17. Twickiwi

    Twickiwi New Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2009
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would have to agree with your reservations about VDH and particularly JA (he seems to reek of dead Rumsfeld).

    I have to question whether three Catobar USS-America type carriers aren't able to do the job of a single USS-Nimitz? Ready to stand corrected.
     
  18. AegisFC

    AegisFC Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2006
    Messages:
    2,036
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Virginia
    An America type can't take E-2 Hawkeye so a variant of the V-22 would have to be developed, which would cost a quite a bit and even then it wouldn't have the range or endurance of the Hawkeye.
    An America type can't support Super Hornet or Growlers, also F-35B carries less and has less range than the F-35C.
     
  19. SoCar37

    SoCar37 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Now this sounds an awful lot like the late 70's discussion regarding CVN-71 vs. 2-3 Sea Control Ships. That time around the key downfall of the SCS was :
    1) No /crappy AEW;
    2) Excessive crew costs. (Even with all those expensive nucs like me :D )

    Large decks just give too much flexibility to give up easily.

    Besides, the F-35 may or may not turn out to the the panacea the USN is hoping for. It might turn out like the A-12, Naval F-111, etc.

    Mike
    SoCar37
     
  20. PO2GRV

    PO2GRV Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0
    what I'm finding difficult to understand is why a ship like the new America-class cannot mount catapaults when the Charles de Gaulle does with only minor (to my unpracticed eye) differences in displacement and length

    the only plausible explanation I can discern is the small hull/conventional propulsion that was not an issue in the much larger Kitty Hawk/Kennedy/Forrestal family of carriers

    as an aside, I wonder how small you could shrink a CATOBAR carrier while maintaining an effective (subjective I know) airwing or if CDG is about the limit, but that is a matter for another post I imagine
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2010