Royal Australian Air Force [RAAF] News, Discussions and Updates

Gooey

Well-Known Member
The RAAF have redefined the role of the C-27J from battlefield airlifter to a HADR role, basically not fit for what they we purchased for, but there is still plenty of life in them and no market to be honest !
So may as well keep them for now, but that leaves a capability gap that does need to be filled somehow, a few chooks does not do that TBH.

I understood that the C-27J purchase was in the same period as the damaged relations with Minister Smith and the period of little integrated management under PM Rudd & Gillard. A senior Sir described the purchase as political and also better than nothing. Sadly, despite the great efforts of 35SQN the aircraft is a bit of a Claytons drink.

The current 12 Js are very tired and their modernisation is expensive in comparison to new-buys. The old Hs, gifted to Indonesia, have not been adequately replaced by the C-27Js and a significant chunk of RAAF experience in the specialist Tactical missions lost. In addition, the AAR role for point refuel and helicopter has never been given the priority they deserve. Possibly because Air is fast jet lead and because Army has the Wokka's. Finally, the true STOL and local missions could easily be run by 20'ish aircraft like GA8 AIrvans or PC-12s flown by local aircrew and/or reservists dispersed around this huge island.

So in summary, it may be just a Lockheed Sales job but it'd be great to correct the current RAAF dogs breakfast now.

Finally, BZ to the Classic Hornet chaps and chapesses! Unbelievable they are gone:)
 

John Newman

The Bunker Group
The first RAAF F/A-18 Hornet I saw ‘in the flesh’ was in 1988 at RAAF Base Richmond for the Bicentennial Airshow (Australia’s 200th Birthday celebrations since British settlement).

There was aircraft on static display, and also air display, especially an air display featuring the new Hornet and the very soon to completely retire Mirage III. It was a great Airshow, best I’ve ever seen.

Below is a brief video from the Airshow featuring the Hornet and Mirage III.

Couple of points to note, one of the pilots in the video, Flt Lt Mel Hupfeld, is now Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld, Chief of Air Force (CAF) for the RAAF.

It’s also interesting to note that 50 survivors of the retired RAAF Mirage III were sold in 1990, and have gone on to another life with the Pakistan Air Force, many reportedly upgraded and still flying today, those aircraft are now 50+ years old.

And today the Classic Hornet is just about to leave service by the end of the year and is progressively being replaced by a growing fleet of F-35A.

And as we know, some of those Classic Hornets are about to re-enter service for their ‘second’ operational life too, will they make it to 50?


Cheers,
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
The first RAAF F/A-18 Hornet I saw ‘in the flesh’ was in 1988 at RAAF Base Richmond for the Bicentennial Airshow (Australia’s 200th Birthday celebrations since British settlement).

There was aircraft on static display, and also air display, especially an air display featuring the new Hornet and the very soon to completely retire Mirage III. It was a great Airshow, best I’ve ever seen.

Below is a brief video from the Airshow featuring the Hornet and Mirage III.

Couple of points to note, one of the pilots in the video, Flt Lt Mel Hupfeld, is now Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld, Chief of Air Force (CAF) for the RAAF.

It’s also interesting to note that 50 survivors of the retired RAAF Mirage III were sold in 1990, and have gone on to another life with the Pakistan Air Force, many reportedly upgraded and still flying today, those aircraft are now 50+ years old.

And today the Classic Hornet is just about to leave service by the end of the year and is progressively being replaced by a growing fleet of F-35A.

And as we know, some of those Classic Hornets are about to re-enter service for their ‘second’ operational life too, will they make it to 50?


Cheers,
Junior better hope they make it to 50 (at least) given his stellar performance on our fighter replacement project.
 

Stampede

Well-Known Member
The first RAAF F/A-18 Hornet I saw ‘in the flesh’ was in 1988 at RAAF Base Richmond for the Bicentennial Airshow (Australia’s 200th Birthday celebrations since British settlement).

There was aircraft on static display, and also air display, especially an air display featuring the new Hornet and the very soon to completely retire Mirage III. It was a great Airshow, best I’ve ever seen.

Below is a brief video from the Airshow featuring the Hornet and Mirage III.

Couple of points to note, one of the pilots in the video, Flt Lt Mel Hupfeld, is now Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld, Chief of Air Force (CAF) for the RAAF.

It’s also interesting to note that 50 survivors of the retired RAAF Mirage III were sold in 1990, and have gone on to another life with the Pakistan Air Force, many reportedly upgraded and still flying today, those aircraft are now 50+ years old.

And today the Classic Hornet is just about to leave service by the end of the year and is progressively being replaced by a growing fleet of F-35A.

And as we know, some of those Classic Hornets are about to re-enter service for their ‘second’ operational life too, will they make it to 50?


Cheers,
It doesn't seem that long ago we were debating whether to go with the F16 or the FA 18.

A generation on we now have the F35 A

Yep, the years do FLY bye :rolleyes:


Regards S
 

John Newman

The Bunker Group
Junior better hope they make it to 50 (at least) given his stellar performance on our fighter replacement project.
Yeah well.... the less said about Canadian procurement the better, hey?

But if you do want well maintained pre-loved combat aircraft, the RAAF is a pretty good place to start.

The last three generations of RAAF fast jets have found second service lives, CAC Sabre, Mirage III and now Hornets.

I think that says a lot for how those aircraft were operated and maintained during their original service lives.
 

cdxbow

Well-Known Member
Yeah well.... the less said about Canadian procurement the better, hey?

But if you do want well maintained pre-loved combat aircraft, the RAAF is a pretty good place to start.

The last three generations of RAAF fast jets have found second service lives, CAC Sabre, Mirage III and now Hornets.

I think that says a lot for how those aircraft were operated and maintained during their original service lives.
John, where did Sabres go?
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
First saw the RAAF F/A-18A at an airshow in Christchurch, must have been summer 1985 / 86. Never really took to the Hornet for some reason. Maybe it just doesn't look right; IMHO it looks ugly when compared to the F-15 or F-16, but not ugly enough to have a beauty of it's own like the BUFF - B-52. The F-35 isn't a looker either but it has an air of lethality about it. It reminds me of a flying bull dog with a grumpy attitude.
 

south

Well-Known Member
Never really took to the Hornet for some reason. Maybe it just doesn't look right; IMHO it looks ugly when compared to the F-15 or F-16
Wash your mouth out!!

Regardless - it was a brilliant little jet for the RAAF and the corner stone of the ADFs Air Combat Capability for a long time. Importantly the strong multi-role legacy that it created will live on with Super-Hornet and F-35.
 

oldsig127

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
Wash your mouth out!!

Regardless - it was a brilliant little jet for the RAAF and the corner stone of the ADFs Air Combat Capability for a long time. Importantly the strong multi-role legacy that it created will live on with Super-Hornet and F-35.
Agree entirely. @ngatimozart 's problem is that as a Kiwi he has very little acquaintance for decades with combat jets



oldsig
 

John Newman

The Bunker Group
First saw the RAAF F/A-18A at an airshow in Christchurch, must have been summer 1985 / 86. Never really took to the Hornet for some reason. Maybe it just doesn't look right; IMHO it looks ugly when compared to the F-15 or F-16, but not ugly enough to have a beauty of it's own like the BUFF - B-52. The F-35 isn't a looker either but it has an air of lethality about it. It reminds me of a flying bull dog with a grumpy attitude.
Ugly? Really?

I’d much prefer a fleet of ‘ugly’ combat aircraft than a fleet of ‘no’ combat aircraft, hey?

Cough cough RNZAF, cough cough, ha ha!!
 

At lakes

Well-Known Member

Whilst I agree with NG to a certain degree the F35 does tend to look like a Beer Barrel on steroids, it is no where as ugly as its competitor in the fly off competition to choose the JSF. The Boeing X32 is one of the worst looking aircraft I have ever seen, a truly BUA (Butt UGLY Aircraft).
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Wash your mouth out!!on the base
I have with some rum.
Regardless - it was a brilliant little jet for the RAAF and the corner stone of the ADFs Air Combat Capability for a long time. Importantly the strong multi-role legacy that it created will live on with Super-Hornet and F-35.
Oh I am not commenting on its capabilities, just the ascetics.
Agree entirely. @ngatimozart 's problem is that as a Kiwi he has very little acquaintance for decades with combat jets
oldsig
The Air Force Museum is just across the city from me and it's the youngest grandson's second home. He's nearly eight and still drags me there any time he can. It doesn't help that he knows that I served on the base and that I lived in the barrack block that they have preserved. The Museum has a couple of Skyhawks, a Macchi, Vampire, Canberra (RAAF), Blunty (Strikemaster - slow fast jet) I think, so I do know what fast jets look like still.
As we know the Kiwi is a flightless bird, sort of like the RNZAF combat fast jet fleet!
Shove a gas turbine under each wing and a rocket up its arse it flies pretty well and pretty quick to.
Here you go Ng some planes for you :)
Cheeky shit :D

Whilst I agree with NG to a certain degree the F35 does tend to look like a Beer Barrel on steroids, it is no where as ugly as its competitor in the fly off competition to choose the JSF. The Boeing X32 is one of the worst looking aircraft I have ever seen, a truly BUA (Butt UGLY Aircraft).
By jeez isn't that half ugly. The BUFF looks absolutely stunning in comparison. Even @recce.k1 Waiouru blondes look better. :D
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group

Whilst I agree with NG to a certain degree the F35 does tend to look like a Beer Barrel on steroids, it is no where as ugly as its competitor in the fly off competition to choose the JSF. The Boeing X32 is one of the worst looking aircraft I have ever seen, a truly BUA (Butt UGLY Aircraft).
Absolutely agree!! Hell, even if it offered great performance (it didn’t), it would have lost on looks. Pilots would have been embarrassed sitting in the cockpit.
 

seaspear

Active Member
I wasn't sure where to post this but thought any news on JORN to be of interest as this suggests an upgrade covering detection of naval and aircraft up to 3000 kilometers
 
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