Royal Australian Air Force [RAAF] News, Discussions and Updates

Lolcake

New Member

Lockheed Martin exec mentioning we are in talks to replace the current 12 C-130js with 24 c-130j-30 and 6 kc-130s. Rfp not released yet but expected in next couple of years. A400m to also be considered
 

ADMk2

Just a bloke
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro

Lockheed Martin exec mentioning we are in talks to replace the current 12 C-130js with 24 c-130j-30 and 6 kc-130s. Rfp not released yet but expected in next couple of years. A400m to also be considered
I wonder if that idea portends an early retirement for C-27J as well?
 

OldTex

Active Member

Lockheed Martin exec mentioning we are in talks to replace the current 12 C-130js with 24 c-130j-30 and 6 kc-130s. Rfp not released yet but expected in next couple of years. A400m to also be considered
The only reason that I could see for replacing the existing C-130J-30s in use in the RAAF would be due expiring airframe life. If that was the case then the RAAF would be more likely to conduct a MLU (along the lines of the F/A-18 Classics).

Extra C-130s would always be useful but the questions becomes where are the aircrews (and maintainers) for these extra airframes to be found and does the operational budget support these extra aircraft and personnel.

Given that the AAR capability is provided by the KC-30s, what is the compelling reason ( and the CONOPS) for the KC-130s? I am sure the "special" people would love the idea of getting helicopters (MH-47G and MH-60M) that were fitted with booms, but again the enablers of budget and personnel seem to be missing.
 

ADMk2

Just a bloke
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
The only reason that I could see for replacing the existing C-130J-30s in use in the RAAF would be due expiring airframe life. If that was the case then the RAAF would be more likely to conduct a MLU (along the lines of the F/A-18 Classics).

Extra C-130s would always be useful but the questions becomes where are the aircrews (and maintainers) for these extra airframes to be found and does the operational budget support these extra aircraft and personnel.

Given that the AAR capability is provided by the KC-30s, what is the compelling reason ( and the CONOPS) for the KC-130s? I am sure the "special" people would love the idea of getting helicopters (MH-47G and MH-60M) that were fitted with booms, but again the enablers of budget and personnel seem to be missing.
The extra airframes and capabilities tor C-130J / KC-130J come straight out of the Force Structure Plan 2019. The expansion of numbers and required workforce are budgeted and planned for.


So does long ranged rotorcraft to ‘enable land force projection and support at greater ranges.’

 

OldTex

Active Member
The extra airframes and capabilities tor C-130J / KC-130J come straight out of the Force Structure Plan 2019. The expansion of numbers and required workforce are budgeted and planned for.


So does long ranged rotorcraft to ‘enable land force projection and support at greater ranges.’

Noting that the C-130J replacement activity is not scheduled to start before 2029, which would suggest that the actual replacement won't occur before perhaps 2035.

Likewise the long ranged rotorcraft activity is also not scheduled to commence before 2029. The introduction of any such platforms will be very much informed by the outcomes of the US FVL and FLRAA projects. So again it is unlikely that new aircraft would be introduced before 2035.
 

ADMk2

Just a bloke
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Noting that the C-130J replacement activity is not scheduled to start before 2029, which would suggest that the actual replacement won't occur before perhaps 2035.

Likewise the long ranged rotorcraft activity is also not scheduled to commence before 2029. The introduction of any such platforms will be very much informed by the outcomes of the US FVL and FLRAA projects. So again it is unlikely that new aircraft would be introduced before 2035.
This story is purely chat from a Lockheed salesman discussing where they see future sales possibilities. As noted in the story, no RFI has even gone out yet. Neither of these projects have even reached Gate 0 as far as we know. So the quoted timelines may well be correct AND defence may have started chatting to prospect bidders.

However, we have seen other projects brought forward depending on priorities, so I wouldn’t be the one to suggest such timelines were absolutely prescriptive.
 

Stampede

Well-Known Member
This story is purely chat from a Lockheed salesman discussing where they see future sales possibilities. As noted in the story, no RFI has even gone out yet. Neither of these projects have even reached Gate 0 as far as we know. So the quoted timelines may well be correct AND defence may have started chatting to prospect bidders.

However, we have seen other projects brought forward depending on priorities, so I wouldn’t be the one to suggest such timelines were absolutely prescriptive.
It could all go many ways.
Sometimes we follow the planning forecasts and this is just an early days discussion for for a future replacement of the existing fleet.
Alternatively like getting four extra Chinooks for Army, we get a surprise purchase.
Maybe we 'll get a couple of addition air frames to top up the existing fleet in short time.
Again it could all go many ways.

If it's a long term thing then it again brings up the question of the basic 1950 design of the c130 and its practicality going forward.
If short term, then adding modest numbers to our existing inventory has merit.

What ever the outcome budget and manning come to mind

Regards S
 

Lolcake

New Member
It could all go many ways.
Sometimes we follow the planning forecasts and this is just an early days discussion for for a future replacement of the existing fleet.
Alternatively like getting four extra Chinooks for Army, we get a surprise purchase.
Maybe we 'll get a couple of addition air frames to top up the existing fleet in short time.
Again it could all go many ways.

If it's a long term thing then it again brings up the question of the basic 1950 design of the c130 and its practicality going forward.
If short term, then adding modest numbers to our existing inventory has merit.

What ever the outcome budget and manning come to mind

Regards S
What would be the likely outcome of the older C-130J-3's if we did get a surprise purchase. Cannibalised for parts or sold off?
 
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Stampede

Well-Known Member
What would be the likely outcome J's if we did get a surprise purchase. Cannibalised for parts or sold off?
Pure guess work, but maybe depends on the C-27J.
If the later is not deemed ready for active deployment then a few additional C130 J's may be the go.

Could read it many ways.

Is the RAAF currently shy on platform numbers across the total transport fleet?

Others could advise.


Regards S
 

SMC

New Member
Where is the information on the possible early retirement of the C-27J coming from? Air force is not THAT unhappy with them or am I missing something?
 

aussienscale

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
Where is the information on the possible early retirement of the C-27J coming from? Air force is not THAT unhappy with them or am I missing something?
The RAAF have redefined the role of the C-27J from battlefield airlifter to a HADR role, basically not fit for what they we purchased for, but there is still plenty of life in them and no market to be honest !
So may as well keep them for now, but that leaves a capability gap that does need to be filled somehow, a few chooks does not do that TBH.

 
Sorry for being off topic but I just got back from the Wings over Illawarra air show which was notable for 2 things
We saw the last aerobatic display by the F/A 18 classic (twice) before it goes out of service tomorrow. The display was done by Group Capain "Easty" who did a great job, he is a former RNZAF A4 pilot
The other thing was the first aerobatic display by the F35 which flew down from 2 OCU for the display. Great show but that thing is LOUD, lucky I had ear plugs The Saturday crowd missed out due to weather at Williamstown
 

DDG38

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
End of an era, farewell to the Hornet.
"The Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18A/B Classic Hornet fleet was formally farewelled by the Minister for Defence, the Hon Peter Dutton MP, Chief of the Air Force, Air Marshal Mel Hupfeld, AO, DSC, Air Force aviators, and industry partners at a ceremony today at RAAF Base Williamtown, New South Wales. Since their arrival in 1985, the Classic Hornets have made an extraordinary contribution to Australia’s air power, including operation theatres of engagement such as Operations Slipper, Falconer and Okra. After more than 30 years of dedicated service, and nearly 408,000 total flying hours, the F/A-18A/B Hornet fleet will transition to the advanced lethality, survivability, and supportability delivered by the fifth-generation F-35A Lightning II fighter." Image Source : ADF Image Library
20211129raaf8185676_0296edit.jpg
 
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