Mars Missions

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
Too bad Venus and Mars couldn’t be orbitally switched. A similar gravity and with some creative microbiology to utilize the CO2 along with SO2 removal, perhaps more potential as a human habitat in 100-200 years (assuming we survive that long:eek:).
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
Too bad Venus and Mars couldn’t be orbitally switched. A similar gravity and with some creative microbiology to utilize the CO2 along with SO2 removal, perhaps more potential as a human habitat in 100-200 years (assuming we survive that long:eek:).
Well, even if that was possible (switching orbit and the removal of H2SO4) , the atmosphere of Venus is around 91× denser than Earth's atmosphere, with other words, the air pressure is around 92 bar. Besides that Venus lacks a planetary magnetic field, has a very thin ozon-layer and worst of all: it rotates the wrong direction!

So from all the planets in our solarsystem, Mars is still the most survivable. Mars lacks a magnetosphere, so solarwinds can cause a problem.
But with a normal Moon-spacesuite, humans should be able to survive on Mars.
 
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