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Japan Air Self-Defence Force

Discussion in 'Air Force & Aviation' started by t68, Jun 8, 2015.

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  1. King Wally

    King Wally Member

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    It seems to me the Japanese love doing things the hard way. Once you factor in all the costs associated with developing your own 5th gen design or restarting a F-22 mark II production line (even if possible) I would have to assume you are going to end up with a cost per aircraft figure that would make the F-35 look like a bargain buy.

    Didn't they follow a similar path years ago with their home grown F16/F2 variant... changing it to such an extent it would have been virtually the same cost to simply bulk buy high end F15's?
     
  2. Ananda

    Ananda Well-Known Member

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    Japan always want to improve their own domestic aviation industries capabilities. Present policy which already more open to export/global market, tend to potentially provide more economics of scale then they used to have (as previously they are only aimed to domestic market).

    F-2 provide opportunity for their electronics and sensors development. Now for F-3, IHI already developing engine prototype with 15 ton wet (afterburner) thrust. That's already comparable with what GE, PW, or Lyuka engine produces today. Granted the US and Russian already working and produced higher thrust engine..still this mean Japan catching up fast on the engine development.

    All they still lacking in experiences now in producing viable airframe design for military fighter. That's what seem they are aiming for F-3.
    They way it shown, this is more on Japanese program to have developed domestic aviations industries for future self reliances.
     
  3. Redlands18

    Redlands18 Member

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    The F-2 is got to be one of the strangest Military Procurement programs in History, spent a fortune to reinvent the Wheel when they had a perfectly good wheel to start with. One of the great what ifs is a more normalised modern Japanese Military that had been allowed to export Military equipment from much earlier.
     
  4. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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    Japan has always wanted to retain a basic infrastructure to produce some military kit. The refusal by the US to sell the F-22 was a wake-up call for Japan. The current US president is wake-call number two. I agree the cost of domestic production via license or actual R&D on a 5th Gen jet will be more expensive. Australia and Canada both justify domestic naval production in order to retain the necessary infrastructure for producing warships (along with jobs). If either country had Japan's technology resources in aviation, local production of jets would be likely too.
     
  5. swerve

    swerve Super Moderator

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    the F-2 was an investment in developing skills & technology, maintaining the ability to build fast jets, & a degree of independence in other weapons & systems.

    The radar of the F-2 is Japanese, & was the first operational AESA fighter radar in the world (though it had some serious flaws when first fielded - fixed long ago). The Japanese missiles developed to use with it didn't need US clearances to integrate with it, so no chance of the US saying "No - you have to buy American", as has sometimes happened when other countries wanted to use their own or other non-US weapons with US aircraft.

    And so on . .