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Perhaps he had a fuel or similar problem that caused the loss of both engines and thought he would be able to stretch the glide and make it to dry land, but didn't make it
 

swerve

Super Moderator
Possibly but why would you and if you still had power why would you ditch? But it also could be the age old problem of having a engine fail and fettering the wrong prop. this has been the cause of more than one accident in the past when the cockpit work load suddenly increases, another option could be that during single engine approach training the other engine failed.
Like the Canadian A330 crew who pumped fuel into a wing tank through a leaking fuel line . . . . but they managed to glide to the Azores & land safely.
 

spoz

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
Do you mean the Gimli Glider; or was there another occasion? In the Gimli case it was a 767; and an error in converting imperial to metric that was the problem if I remember correctly.
 

OldTex

Active Member
Do you mean the Gimli Glider; or was there another occasion? In the Gimli case it was a 767; and an error in converting imperial to metric that was the problem if I remember correctly.
Swerve is referring to the Air Transat flight 236 in 2001. Story here. The aircraft involved was an Airbus A330.
 

swerve

Super Moderator
Yes, the other case that showed what good gliders airliners are.

The Air Transat case began with a fuel line leak caused by poor maintenance (I think management insisted on using a non-standard spare part which was in stock to get the plane into the air quickly & cheaply, over the protests of the maintenance crew, rather than buy & wait for delivery of the correct part). The crew didn't understand what was going wrong & responded wrongly. Good flying once the engines stopped, though. Everyone safe, & the plane repaired & returned to service, IIRC.
 

Ananda

The Bunker Group
Xavier report on Sea and Airspace for Day 1.


Xavier focus on Constelation Frigate development. There's model on latest design rendering. Still 32 Mark 41 VLS and 16 SSM. The Marieta yard spokeman talk about the progress on new yard facilities, which he claim more automated and efficients.

Also LM showcase their expeditionary launching system. Seems base on mobile Mk41.
 

StingrayOZ

Super Moderator
Staff member
Something on the US decommissioning 24 ships..
But the fiscal 2023 White House budget request released on March 28 calls for the retirement of 24 ships and the construction of just nine, leaving the Navy further from its fleet-building goal than when it started.
This, along with an anemic building program, will shrink the navy to 280 ships, at the same time they are calling to build a 500-ship Navy.
LCS is gone, but did it really contribute much anyway. Loosing the cruisers, the older Burkes, and the Marines will be in crisis with their amphibious fleet as well as issues with subs.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Xavier report on Sea and Airspace for Day 1.

Also LM showcase their expeditionary launching system. Seems base on mobile Mk41.
Yes that containerised Mk-41 VLS really intrigued me. Fits inside 40ft boxes from the looks of it and could easily be hidden in plain sight. Just another container plying the world's trade routes.
 

Ananda

The Bunker Group

Video from Naval News from Sea Air Space 2022 in DC. This video shown development projects, and bit more focus on Huttington Ingals (HII) projects.
 

StingrayOZ

Super Moderator
Staff member
All the cruisers are to go, story on USNI News.

All 22 remaining cruisers are set to leave the fleet by 2027.
...
The Navy’s current plan is to replace the cruisers with the upcoming Flight III Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. The first Flight III, Jack Lucas (DDG-125), is set to commission next year. The destroyers will enter service at a rate far slower than the cruisers are leaving.
...
In the mid-2010s, the service went ahead and took seven of the ships out of service, saying they would later be modernized to reenter the fleet as older cruisers reached the end of their service lives. The ships were not officially decommissioned, but instead entered a limbo state where crew numbers shrank to near-caretaker size. Stores, fuel and much of the ships’ equipment were removed, and at different stages the ships were “inducted” into a cruiser modernization program. Some shipyard work was done on the ships, but only in phases.

None of the ships inducted into the cruiser modernization program have returned to service. Two, Hue City and Anzio, are already slated for decommissioning this year and are in such poor condition the Navy determined they’re no longer worth repairing.
While the burke flight III are set to sort of replace them, they won't come on quickly enough. Its not just the missile load out they will be missing either with space for command capabilities short in the fleet post 2027 as the new radar consumes the smaller command space available on burkes. Also its not like the cruisers will be fully operational up until 2027, they have been progressively assigned home water duties, effectively they are out of the fight already, as upgrade work has uncovered a myriad of problems across the entire fleet.

Work on their replacements has barely begun. There are also various issues with the upgrades to existing Burkes, with that not going to plan either. The HED on Truxtun for example. One also wonders how long the older burkes will stay in fleet for, with USS Barry undergoing its last major upgrade 8 years ago and now 30 years old. Also the life extension program was also cancelled so 35 years old destroyers will be leaving at the same time as the cruisers. That is another 28 ships that will disappear in the next 10 years. Many of these ships have had busy and hard lives and 35 years may be an asperation. In addition the USN intends to extensively upgrade the existing ships which will see them leave the water for extended periods.


I think the US and its allies will really feel the loosing of these 22 ships. Part of US leadership is the cruisers, which can embark command, and lead a multinational taskforce. Any existing ships will be more than fully busy with just US required taskings including escorting carriers. Decommissioning more than 50 of the most important ships in the next 10 years will have massive ramifications for the remaining fleet and exercises and patrols.

Countries like South Korea, Japan, Australia will have to provide their own leadership capability for taskgroups and fleets. Other allied nations Will have even greater difficulty.
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
A rather sad situation for young junior USN sailors with only shipboard accommodations available. Perhaps as the ship is off line being upgraded an onboard temporary pub entertainment area would help? Likely an impossible ask!

 

76mmGuns

Active Member
The Zumwalt can now fire ESSM's and SM-2's- final testing done. Still no proper offensive weapons beyond 2 x 30mm guns though.

(yes, I know they can use the missiles for offense if need be, but it's not their primary function)

 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
The Zumwalt can now fire ESSM's and SM-2's- final testing done. Still no proper offensive weapons beyond 2 x 30mm guns though.

(yes, I know they can use the missiles for offense if need be, but it's not their primary function)

Once the two 155 AGS are removed I see a hypersonic missile future for this class.
 

Lolcake

Member
US legaslative bill to open up US sub training to Australian Sailors. Welcome news.

 

AndyinOz

Member
US legaslative bill to open up US sub training to Australian Sailors. Welcome news.

Seems that the preparations for the transition of the RAN to nuclear powered attack boats is gathering a little pace. Authorization for or so 2 officers exchange a year seems to suggest they are preparing for a 13 - 15 year or so pipeline for command staff (not including time already spent in the RAN at commencement) if my simple interested civilian calculations are correct. Everyone talks about which boat will be chosen and how it can and how fast it will be built. The human factor is just as vital of course.
"Dubbed the “The Australia-U.S. Submarine Officer Pipeline Act,” the legislation would allow Australia to send at least two of its submarine warfare officers to train with American sailors each year. The Royal Australian Navy officers would first attend the Navy Nuclear Propulsion School, then take the Submarine Officer Basic Course, and finally deploy aboard a U.S. submarine after finishing the basic course, according to text of the bill."
 

Redlands18

Well-Known Member
seems to suggest they are preparing for a 13 - 15 year or so pipeline for command staff (not including time already spent in the RAN at commencement) if my simple interested civilian calculations are correct. Everyone talks about which boat will be chosen and how it can and how fast it will be built. The human factor is just as vital of course.
Some friendly advice there is currently a red ink warning against speculation on Australian Submarines, I would heed it if I was you.
 

AndyinOz

Member
Some friendly advice there is currently a red ink warning against speculation on Australian Submarines, I would heed it if I was you.
Yes you are quite right, definitely would like to avoid the dreaded red ink especially not being someone really in the know. I possibly went a bit far with that comment with the limited research I did after reading that article.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Rheinmettall has been awarded a contract to develop a 30mm x 173 airburst solution for the USN. Rheinmetall to develop 30mm x 173 Airburst Solution for the U.S. Navy - Naval News This is interesting and will hopefully give the USN and others good options for their 30mm guns.

RIMPAC 28 has officially started with 26 partner nations participating, plus Russian and Chinese surveillance ships loitering with intent outside the exercise boundary areas. RIMPAC 2022 Officially Kicks off - Naval News

ADDITION: USNI article on RIMPAC RIMPAC 2022 Kicks Off in Hawaii With 21 Partner Nation Ships - USNI News
Countries participating include Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Denmark, Ecuador, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, the Republic of Korea, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tonga, the United Kingdom and the United States. Countries not represented by ships at the exercise will be represented by ground elements, along with participation either in the various combined command and staff groups or as observers.

SHIPS:
Australia
  • Landing helicopter dock HMAS Canberra (L02)
  • Frigate HMAS Warramunga (FFH152)
  • Replenishment ship HMAS Supply (A195)
Canada
  • Frigates HMCS Vancouver (FFH331) and HMCS Winnipeg (FFH338)
Chile
  • Frigate Almirante Lynch (FF07)
France
  • Frigate FS Prairial (F731)
India
  • Frigate INS Satpura (F48)
Indonesia
  • Frigate KRI I Gusti Ngurah Rai (332)
Japan
  • Helicopter Destroyer JS Izumo (DDH-183)
  • Destroyer JS Takanami ((DD-110)
Malaysia
  • Corvette KD Lekir (FSG26)
Mexico
  • Frigate ARM Juárez (POLA-101)
  • Landing ship tank ARM Usumacinta (A412)
New Zealand
  • Replenishment ship HMNZS Aotearoa (A11)
Peru
  • Corvette BAP Guise (CC-28) – corvette
The Philippines
  • Frigate BRP Antonio Luna (FF-151)
Republic of Korea
  • Landing helicopter platform ROKS Marado (LPH-6112)
  • Destroyers ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG-991) and ROKS Munmu the Great (DDH-976)
  • Attack submarine ROKS Shin Dol-seok (SS-082)
Singapore
  • Frigate RSS Intrepid (69)
GROUND FORCES:
  • A Joint Landing Force from Australia, which will have a platoon from His Majesty’s Armed Forces of Tonga, an Indonesian Marine Corps platoon, a Mexican Marines company, and a New Zealand Army Joint Fires Team that will include Joint Terminal Attack Controllers.
  • The ROK will field a substantial ground element with a ROK Marine Corps company, four Naval Special Warfare Flotilla teams and a Naval mobile construction squadron.
  • A Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF) element of 40 personnel will also participate in RIMPAC, though Japan has yet to specify what the JGSDF element will be doing in the exercise.
AVIATION:
Four countries – Australia, India, Japan and the ROK – have confirmed that their fixed wing aircraft will join, with two Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) P-8 Poseidon Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA), an Indian Navy P-8I MPA, a Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) P-1 MPA and a Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) P-3 Orion MPA.
 
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