UAS developments and/or issues

Blue Jay

Member
The cargo UAS op-ed drives home some discussions I've had about automation and its implications for civilian jobs. How long till they are used for personnel transport?

It also occurs to me that the whole idea about flying cars might not grow out of ground vehicles, or helicopters, but from UAS systems. Current concepts being explored for self-driving cars could be implemented for personal UAS transports to solve many of the safety and traffic problems identified with a predominantly flying infrastructure. UAS also seems to be the solution to the prohibitive cost of flying vehicles. Meanwhile automation would eliminate the need for technically challenging and potentially expensive training.
 

colay1

Member
Grunts in the field are being provided with a new toy to reduce the risk of nasty surprises in the course of conducting operations. The tech is small, light and simple enough to operate that 24-hour coverage may some day become SOP.

https://defensesystems.com/articles/2017/05/10/smalldrone.aspx

Soldiers will soon have rugged small personal drones


BY KATHERINE OWENS
MAY 10, 2017

AeroVironment’s newly released unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system, equipped the latest infrared imaging and processing technology, consists of a rugged control tablet and two drones small enough to sit in a soldier’s palm.

This latest nano unmanned vehicle (NAV), called the Snipe, is a 140-gram autonomous quadcopter that can reach speeds of up to 22mph for a distance of almost a mile, and endure winds up to 20 mph, according to AeroVironment statements...

Large operations can obtain situational intelligence from helicopters, satellites and larger drones, like the Raven, explained Col. Phil Cheatham, deputy branch chief of the Electronics and Special Developments Branch at the Maneuver Center of Excellence.

However, soldiers operating at the smaller squad level aren’t getting information on what’s around the corner, over the hill, or past the trees, which is particularly problematic when the enemy knows the terrain, he said.

“What snipe does it allows those units to go beyond line of sight to see potential threats and decide how they should prosecute their mission and when they should prosecute their mission,” said John Ross, original Snipe Program Manager at AeroVironment. “The Snipe provides…tactical advantage. It allows a small unit to see first, know first, and act first.”
 

Volkodav

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
I wonder if the proliferation of small drones will see an increase in shotguns issued in the field and skeet shooting introduced into training.
 

gf0012-aust

Grumpy Old Man
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
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I wonder if the proliferation of small drones will see an increase in shotguns issued in the field and skeet shooting introduced into training.
the israelis have been dealing with them with shotguns when at close range
 

colay1

Member
From the small to the large, the US is exploring a UAV-based laser system to swat down ballistic missiles in their vulnerable boost phase. Another layer to the BMD onion intended to give pause to a foe considering mischief.

https://defensesystems.com/articles/2017/06/19/mda-pentagon-lasers.aspx

New drone laser weapon could stop enemy missiles in boost phase

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) is seeking a new high altitude long endurance (HALE) unmanned aerial vehicle with the unique capacity to carry a high energy laser system that can stop enemy missiles when they have barely left the launch pad, according to a new MDA request for information...

According to the request for information, the MDA is looking for unmanned vehicle that can reach and maintain an altitude of 63,000 or more ft. and fly for more than 36 hours. Most importantly, the new HALE must have the ability to carry a payload of at least 5,000 lbs. and up to 12,500 lbs. It must also be able to provide a steady 140 to 280 kW of power to the payload laser system it is carrying.
 

colay1

Member
Another UAS-based approach to BMD that aims to counter the threat during the Boost Phase Intercept window when the missile is most vulnerable. But this will employ kinetic interceptors instead of lasers.

An MIT study describes a scenario where a pair of MQ-9 Reapers use their IR sensors to detect and target BM immediately after launch.The aircraft would be on persistent patrol in international airspace along the hostile country's border and be able to take them out with a notional long-range interceptor ie. NCADE-like missile on steroids.

https://www.usni.org/magazines/proc...oost-phase-could-counter-north-korea-part-two
 

south

Active Member
Another UAS-based approach to BMD that aims to counter the threat during the Boost Phase Intercept window when the missile is most vulnerable. But this will employ kinetic interceptors instead of lasers.

An MIT study describes a scenario where a pair of MQ-9 Reapers use their IR sensors to detect and target BM immediately after launch.The aircraft would be on persistent patrol in international airspace along the hostile country's border and be able to take them out with a notional long-range interceptor ie. NCADE-like missile on steroids.

https://www.usni.org/magazines/proc...oost-phase-could-counter-north-korea-part-two
Sounds good, however if the bad guys are shooting BM’s hardly seems much putting them in international airspace - not like that’s going to stop them getting shot down because they are 12NM off the coast!
 

kinetic

New Member
This article discusses recent advances in anti-UAV efforts. Apparently EW technology is emerging as a decent solution but other counter UAV weapons will be in the mix as well.

https://www.realcleardefense.com/ar...t_lethal_counter_drone_technology_114755.html
The article is perfect example to why the US Military is considered to be a bunch of technological fetishists :)

Long story short, if they think they are ready to take on an amassed attack of a crapload of cheap drones with EW, they should put that EW system in the middle of a weapons range, attack it with a couple dozen of good old Tomahawks(serving as target drones in this case) and see what happens. Spoiler: nothing good, because the problem at large cannot be solved through simple procurement. This is not possible in principle.
 

Boagrius

Well-Known Member
The article is perfect example to why the US Military is considered to be a bunch of technological fetishists :)

Long story short, if they think they are ready to take on an amassed attack of a crapload of cheap drones with EW, they should put that EW system in the middle of a weapons range, attack it with a couple dozen of good old Tomahawks(serving as target drones in this case) and see what happens. Spoiler: nothing good, because the problem at large cannot be solved through simple procurement. This is not possible in principle.
Huh? I don't think the article was saying that at all - simply highlighting the utility of EW as part of the broader picture... one that includes things like M-SHORAD, MML, IBCS and directed energy weapons (for example).
 
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