Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) update

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
Finishing these 6 frigates can be more cost effective than aborting this program after 4 vessels and then search for other designs, select one, start negotiations, sign a new contract, set up a production line and begin to construct a whole new design.

It will also take a lot of time, perhaps 5 years to start a new project. The Indonesian government discontinued the SIGMA 10514 program, and now years later, Indonesia has still only two modern frigates.

And how about the foreign and domestic suppliers of components/parts? Maybe BNS has to pay a lot of fines to compensate losses from supplying companies.
 

koxinga

Well-Known Member
Finishing these 6 frigates can be more cost effective than aborting this program after 4 vessels and then search for other designs, select one, start negotiations, sign a new contract, set up a production line and begin to construct a whole new design.

It will also take a lot of time, perhaps 5 years to start a new project. The Indonesian government discontinued the SIGMA 10514 program, and now years later, Indonesia has still only two modern frigates.

And how about the foreign and domestic suppliers of components/parts? Maybe BNS has to pay a lot of fines to compensate losses from supplying companies.
Whether it is cost effective or not is debatable. The problem is no one actually knows what the final bill for the 6 LCS will be or how an abort -> new contract will look like.

The duration it will take for the Indonesia government and my guess, for the Malaysian government are largely internal politics. If any of these countries choose an off-the-shelf design, no local construction deal with Naval Group or HHI, the timelines should be well within the control of the shipyards. But we all know that is not likely to happen.
 
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