What equipment is still in operationa/training l use from WWII

Feanor

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Vietnam still has a bunch of WWII anti-tank gun in service, specifically the ZiS-2 57mm and ZiS-3 76mm. They're in service with their marines.


Also some Soviet 37mm AAA guns on the Spartley islands.


T-34-85s in exercises, also in the Spartley islands.


Also they still have Su-100 SPGs (or would they be classified as TDs?). And they're not just in storage, the second link has footage of live fire exercises.


85mm D-44s also still in active service.


PPSh being used to simulate what appears to be artillery fire at table-top training exercises.

 
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Feanor

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Vietnam continues to deliver, Soviet pre-war AAA. I can't help but wonder just how much gear they have in storage. It's reminiscent of Soviet/Russian depots.

 

Feanor

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BS-3 anti-tank guns and M-30 howitzers in service in Mongolia, at a live fire exercise. The BS-3 dates to 1944, the M-30 to 1938.

 

ngatimozart

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Vietnam continues to deliver, Soviet pre-war AAA. I can't help but wonder just how much gear they have in storage. It's reminiscent of Soviet/Russian depots.

They might be old, but they're still capable of ruining an unlucky flyboy's day.
 

Feanor

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They might be old, but they're still capable of ruining an unlucky flyboy's day.
In principle yes. However there's a reason these systems have been retired. Their chances of hitting something are extremely low. Keeping them in storage and manning them costs something. It's not free. I can't help but wonder what the point is? Their odds of hitting a modern fast jet are basically 0. They could ambush helos, I guess. But with modern electro-optics their chances for success aren't great. If they use radios for comms, they get geo-located by ELINT/SIGINT posts. If they don't, they have literally no warning of incoming aircraft. They also have to be supplied with food and water, which means tying up logistical capacity. Overall I guess they're better then nothing if nothing is the alternative. But it's hard to see why nothing is alternative. Vietnam has money. They could invest in relatively inexpensive and far more modern systems.
 

Gryphinator

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Getting some good stuff on here, just goes to show how good some design have lasted

But I imagine the small and medium caliber weapons won’t be actual WWII weapons still in service


But it does make how many L1A1 are stored away for the ADF as I remember mick smith gun store in Sydney selling brand new in its original grease packing paper in the 1980’s

I was tempted to buy a MK4 snipers rifle, I still could not believe who many new SMLE he had for sale. But I suppose with the gun laws the way they are the won’t come on the market anyway
I went to Macrossan in the 90's and was told they had L1A1's still in packing grease in another warehouse. Would love to see the inventory list of what's there now-and Wallangarra etc...

Mod Edit: Correct formatting.

Ngatimozart.
 
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Redlands18

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I went to Macrossan in the 90's and was told they had L1A1's still in packing grease in another warehouse. Would love to see the inventory list of what's there now-and Wallangarra etc...

Mod Edit: Correct formatting.

Ngatimozart.
Well the L1A1 or better known in the Australian Army as the SLR is still in service as the Drill Rifle used by the Federation Guard, which i thought was a great idea, just looks far better then using the Steyr in that role.
 

t68

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Well the L1A1 or better known in the Australian Army as the SLR is still in service as the Drill Rifle used by the Federation Guard, which i thought was a great idea, just looks far better then using the Steyr in that role.

Agree, I have done Catafalque Party using both weapons would have to say using the SLR is by far the more impressive of the two. Untill the VIP’s speech waffles on far to long and you foot goes numb with the barrel resting on it too long, only happened the once but by crikey it was hard to to the steps again when you can’t feel your foot.

But can’t help thinking what the procedure was using the SMLE as I’ve never seen it done.

Can’t seem to find any footage, cant looking on the AWM site just pictures of reversed arms using SLR. Nagati might know he’s been around the block a few times


PS

Found it on cadets drill manual

 
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Redlands18

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Agree, I have done Catafalque Party using both weapons would have to say using the SLR is by far the more impressive of the two. Untill the VIP’s speech waffles on far to long and you foot goes numb with the barrel resting on it too long, only happened the once but by crikey it was hard to to the steps again when you can’t feel your foot.

But can’t help thinking what the procedure was using the SMLE as I’ve never seen it done.

Can’t seem to find any footage, cant looking on the AWM site just pictures of reversed arms using SLR. Nagati might know he’s been around the block a few times
I will admit, i done Drill with both the SLR and Steyr and from that point of view preferred the Steyr but like the US Military special Drill Squads who use the M-1 Garand, the older style Rifle adds something to the spectacle that the Steyr or M-16 lacks.
 

Gryphinator

New Member
I will admit, i done Drill with both the SLR and Steyr and from that point of view preferred the Steyr but like the US Military special Drill Squads who use the M-1 Garand, the older style Rifle adds something to the spectacle that the Steyr or M-16 lacks.
Only ever used the SLR as a cadet. When I went ARA it was Steyr only- I'll go for that on weight alone for drill (lazy/old now)
 

ngatimozart

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I did all my drill on the SLR and IMHO, it looks far snappier than Steyr drill. Then again my opinion is somewhat biased.

I note that the new NZDF drill with their new rifles looks like a mixture of Steyr and SLR drill. They don't rest the rifle on the ground at the AT EASE command because the new rifles are to short.
 

At lakes

Active Member
I did my initial cadet training on a lump called the .303 then the SLR on enlistment, and by the time I signed my form 717 the Steyr was still a dream in the planners mind
 

Feanor

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PM-43 (from 1943) mortars in service in Mongolia in the top photo (it and the rest of the set are Russo-Mongolian training exercises Selenge-2020). Note the wheeled carriages standing separately behind them.

 
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