The Royal Navy Discussions and Updates

StobieWan

Super Moderator
Staff member
This is why I've always burst out laughing when someone suggests the possibility of hacking the keychain for Trident - you'd need Penn and Teller to swap a letter into a safe. Cue the music...
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
The RN Type 32 early concept phase has started. It appears that it may be a GP frigate.

1665803207649.png

"As part of its operational concept, the Type 32 will bring increased capability and presence at sea, in particular to support RN Littoral Response Groups (LRGs) and other overseas operational commitments. The Type 32 is also central in RN medium-term plans to grow its surface fleet.
The Type 32 programme was announced on 19 November 2020, when the UK revealed that a programme to build the next generation of RN warships would include the Type 32 as a third new frigate type (the other two being the in-build Type 26 City-class and Type 31 Inspiration-class frigates, which are replacing the 13 in-service Type 23 frigates)."​

The intention is for the Type 32 to go out to commercial competition once the RN has the operational concept and its requirements provisionally finalised. I say provisionally because the RN has the habit of changing its requirements mid build. There are also the usual minefields of SDRs, Pollies, elections, and MOD bureaucrats to navigate before the first vessel will kiss the water.

 

spoz

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
Looks like she’s going to have to be jacked up a bit to fit the sonar dome before launch…..
 

Systems Adict

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
Looks like she’s going to have to be jacked up a bit to fit the sonar dome before launch…..

Sorry Spoz, no need for jacking up, the bow sonar dome will get fitted later on, after float off, once the ship is in dry dock. A standard procedure that I've seen on all the naval vessels I've worked on over the last 30 years.
 

spoz

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
Sorry Spoz, no need for jacking up, the bow sonar dome will get fitted later on, after float off, once the ship is in dry dock. A standard procedure that I've seen on all the naval vessels I've worked on over the last 30 years.
What a very strange way to do business. I’ve worked on 5 destroyer/frigate programs and we have always fitted the dome before launch. Ah well, each to their own I suppose. I haven’t yet seen the design of the cradle for the Hunters so it will be interesting to see what they do, noting that they will be launched from the same ship lift as would have to take them out again, the nearest dry dock being 1,000 miles away.
 

John Newman

The Bunker Group
What a very strange way to do business. I’ve worked on 5 destroyer/frigate programs and we have always fitted the dome before launch. Ah well, each to their own I suppose. I haven’t yet seen the design of the cradle for the Hunters so it will be interesting to see what they do, noting that they will be launched from the same ship lift as would have to take them out again, the nearest dry dock being 1,000 miles away.
Spoz,

I know this is only an ‘animation’, but it is produced by BAE Systems Australia, it’s reasonably current, about five months old:


It shows the production process for the Hunter class, it also clearly shows the radar dome fitted to the hull prior to launch.
 

OldTex

Active Member
In another much anticipated announcement, The Royal Navy will get 3 FSS ships built in Belfast to a BMT design. The team also includes Navantia, which is expected to upgrade the Harland & Wolff shipyard to modern standards. Construction of the FSS vessels is supposed to commence in 2025 with final delivery occurring in 2032. How hard and fast these dates are only time will tell.

Some interesting background to the Team Resolute offering for the FSS can be found on the Navy Lookout site, including these articles:

Spanish-led-partnership-reveal-details-of-their-fleet-solid-support-ship-proposal and

British-spanish-team-bid-to-build-the-fleet-solid-support-ship
 
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Systems Adict

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
What a very strange way to do business. I’ve worked on 5 destroyer/frigate programs and we have always fitted the dome before launch. Ah well, each to their own I suppose. I haven’t yet seen the design of the cradle for the Hunters so it will be interesting to see what they do, noting that they will be launched from the same ship lift as would have to take them out again, the nearest dry dock being 1,000 miles away.
The issue with the sonar dome in the UK is that we have predominately 'launched' ships down slipways, with the weight of the ship resting on the keel / ground. Our facilities & infrastructure are geared up to fit the dome AFTER launching, as the sonar dome normally protrudes 10 to 20 feet below the keel.

In Australia, the ships have been predominately 'Floated off' from the synchrolift & with limited dry docking facilities close by, it makes sense that the sonar & dome are fitted pre 'launch'.
 

Volkodav

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
I curious about the announcement on the next five Type 26. I know there's politics and appearances involved but it seems to read like they were in doubt and there may only have been three all up.

When I first read it I thought they were saying they had increased the program back to 13 ships, before I realised it was just the announcement of the final five to reach eight.

It sounds as if they were seriously considering only three with the remaining numbers made up by postulated Type 32. i.e. a fleet of 6 Darlings, 3 Type 26, 5 Type 31 and 5 Type 32. Now it at least sounds like with 8 Type 26 ordered, that the Type 32 with claw back numbers slightly, assuming they proceed at all.
 

Stampede

Well-Known Member
I curious about the announcement on the next five Type 26. I know there's politics and appearances involved but it seems to read like they were in doubt and there may only have been three all up.

When I first read it I thought they were saying they had increased the program back to 13 ships, before I realised it was just the announcement of the final five to reach eight.

It sounds as if they were seriously considering only three with the remaining numbers made up by postulated Type 32. i.e. a fleet of 6 Darlings, 3 Type 26, 5 Type 31 and 5 Type 32. Now it at least sounds like with 8 Type 26 ordered, that the Type 32 with claw back numbers slightly, assuming they proceed at all.
Two large fleet carriers will need escorts.
Whatever the mix, I trust the RNs destroyer / frigate numbers do not decrease any further going forward.
Confirmation for 8 type 26 is good news.
Cheers s
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Two large fleet carriers will need escorts.
Whatever the mix, I trust the RNs destroyer / frigate numbers do not decrease any further going forward.
Confirmation for 8 type 26 is good news.
Cheers s
It's Poms we are talking about so capabilities aren't confirmed until they are in the water, on the parade ground, or in the hangar.
 

Musashi_kenshin

Well-Known Member
Not really sure the future of the Type 26 was in doubt. It was an issue of timescales, not cancellation. Leaving the number of hulls at three would have smashed the future of the Royal Navy as well as reset the plan for a drumbeat of production to keep skills in place.

As for capabilities, these are pretty much locked in with the contract being signed. The only question is strike capability with FC-ASW still being developed.
 
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