South Korean Navy

RobWilliams

Super Moderator
Staff member
ASW cruiser I could understand, just me being picky about designations I guess, like while an ASW cruiser can carry aircraft it ain't an "aircraft carrier" if that makes sense.
 

t68

Well-Known Member
ASW cruiser I could understand, just me being picky about designations I guess, like while an ASW cruiser can carry aircraft it ain't an "aircraft carrier" if that makes sense.
I take it your suggesting a more aviation enhanced Sejong the Great destroyer with 3 or more helicopters?

The Japanese already tried that then built the Hygua class
 

StobieWan

Super Moderator
Staff member
The article also mentioned the possible purchase and refit of the USN's old S-3 Vikings.



If so this makes me smile, I have always liked that plane.
I'm sure we (the UK) looked at pulling some of those frames in for MPA use but by the time they'd been upgraded to modern avionics etc, you were looking at peeling the tail number off and painting it on a new jet in terms of cost.

Shame, I had a sneaking admiration for the thing as well.
 

gf0012-aust

Grumpy Old Man
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
I'm sure we (the UK) looked at pulling some of those frames in for MPA use but by the time they'd been upgraded to modern avionics etc, you were looking at peeling the tail number off and painting it on a new jet in terms of cost.

Shame, I had a sneaking admiration for the thing as well.
An S3 with current gen digital suites would be a formidable little plane. The idle chat amonst some I know in the fixed wing ASW community was that they were in a few areas technically superior to the Canadian Auroras
 

LondoBell

New Member
You make a very good point: Looking at the biggest potentia threat to South Korea (North Korea) one would think that a large ocean going navy is completely unnessary for purposes of national defense. The reason however is national pride. In order to be considered among the most powerful nations in the world one must have a powerful navy. This has always been the case. In the late 1800's It was presumed that although Germany had the best army in Europe they couldn't win a war with the Britain who not only had the largest and best navy but was considered the most powerful nation in the world. South Korea wants to be able to project power beyond the Korean peninsula and in order to that today a nation needs aircraft carriers. Today when ever there is an international security incident in which armies must be deployed oversees the first question is will America, Britian, and France send troops. The second question is will Italy and Spain send troops(From a purely strategic stampoint, Japan even though they lack an aircraft carrier would be included in this second group. However it is still somewhat taboo for Japan given its past to deploy combat troops.) This is because these are the only nations that could send troops far oversees and have the ability to support these troops. South Korea wants to be a major international player and an aircraft carrier combined with their new amphibious capability, the KDX destroyers and good logistical support would be the perfect way to place them in the same group as the other major powers and increase their international standing and national pride and prestige.:cool:
Japan did a reinterpretation of what they wrote after Japan so they are now less restricted in the way of overseas deployments.
 

dumpster4

New Member
North Korean mini-subs may get most of the attention, but South Korea builds a
few of them too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolgorae-class_submarine

http://defense-studies.blogspot.com/2011/12/south-korea-displays-new-mini-sub.html

According to:

http://www.janes.com/article/54825/...on-of-mini-submarine-for-undisclosed-customer


Hyundai is producing a mini-submarine for an undisclosed customer.

Is this the same Hyundai that produces cars?

Are there any clues as to who the customer is?

Are these purely SPECFOR operations platforms, or can they be used for
torpedo/missile attacks too?
 
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ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
South Korea navy very advanced. but it sounds inadequate.
You have posted six times on here in quick succession and none of those posts offer anything constructive to the discussion. You have also broken the posting rules multiple times which does not make your future on here look to be very long. Take this as some very strong advice, read and abide by the rules.
 

t68

Well-Known Member
Just a question, the second unit of the Dokdo-class, the Marado, is it already under construction or still on hold?
Not sure if she's under construction yet, but I was under the impression she was having design changes to accomadated fixed wing aircraft which I took as F35B, unless they have plans for OV-10 Bronco type aircraft which they don't have and from memory they have not said if they will get F35B either, unless I am mistaken.
 

SpazSinbad

Active Member
As one would expect given the recent developments in our area of interest with Japan buying some 42 total F-35Bs (in a much larger combined total with F-35As) to operate from modified IZUMO class 'multi-functional flat decks'. Australian reaction to Japan & F-35B ops seems to be absent so far. But anyway - roll the video....

Helo carrier Dokdo, F-35B prospects

 

hauritz

Well-Known Member
As one would expect given the recent developments in our area of interest with Japan buying some 42 total F-35Bs (in a much larger combined total with F-35As) to operate from modified IZUMO class 'multi-functional flat decks'. Australian reaction to Japan & F-35B ops seems to be absent so far. But anyway - roll the video....

Helo carrier Dokdo, F-35B prospects

We seem to almost have a Mexican standoff with South Korea, China and Japan. If anything the Koreans seem more concerned about the Japanese operating a carrier than they are with the Chinese.

The Dokdo does strike me as being too small to be an effective carrier. However I wouldn't underestimate their ability to build a much larger ship. They have one of the most efficient shipbuilding industries in the world.
 

StobieWan

Super Moderator
Staff member
We seem to almost have a Mexican standoff with South Korea, China and Japan. If anything the Koreans seem more concerned about the Japanese operating a carrier than they are with the Chinese.

The Dokdo does strike me as being too small to be an effective carrier. However I wouldn't underestimate their ability to build a much larger ship. They have one of the most efficient shipbuilding industries in the world.

It wouldn't be in any way a challenge to look at some UK plans to operate VLCC's in a converted Harrier carrier role and put them into action - ballast them with sea water and they'd be very damage resistant in a lot of situations and you could get a dozen or so aircraft on and off the deck fairly regularly. That's a "WWIII looms" scenario but it is possible.
 
When you look on Wikipedia at South Korean navy plans. One of the future requirements is 2 light aircraft carriers and that was before the Japanese decision.
 

spoz

The Bunker Group
The Koreans don’t like the Japanese. Making conversation I once asked a Korean three star what would happen if the two Koreas reintegrated under the Southern system. He said something along the lines of “we would then have the military capacity to take on Japan”. I don’t think he was joking.
 
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