RSN capabilities

OPSSG

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Additional thoughts on the planned move to an all Type 218SG class (or Invincible class)

The launch of Invincible is testament to the warm and growing defence ties between Singapore and Germany. Bilateral defence relations have strengthened with the signing of the enhanced Defence Cooperation Agreement (eDCA) in 2018. The eDCA paves the way forward for cooperation in areas of mutual interest, such as in submarine training, defence technology and cyber defence. Both countries also cooperate and interact widely through high-level visits and dialogues, military exchanges, cross-attendance of professional courses and technology collaboration.
Wonder if RSN would be also interested in acquiring the remaining two Sodermanland class when they retire from the RSwN.
It's all German from now on. ST Marine has wound up it's Swedish JV, Fortis Marine Solutions Pte. Ltd.
Singapore’s four new submarines will replace the navy’s current Archer-class and Challenger-class submarines. Beyond its longer length and diameter, compared to its predecessor classes of submarines operated by the Singapore Navy, enabling the Invincible class to house a large flank array sonar, special attention has also been paid to the Combat System with ST Electronics, co-developing it with Atlas Elektronik GmbH.
Challenger-class submarines are an old design; suffered a number of deficiencies due to its small size at 1,400 tons (50m x 6.1m) and limited submerged endurance (without AIP); and was very expensive to maintain. The older submarines took longer to recharge its' batteries than the Invincible class at 2,200 tonnes (at 70m x 6.3m and equipped with 2 x MTU Series 12V 4000 engines); with crew ergonomics and combat systems design less than ideal for Singapore's concept of submarine operations.

One, larger displacements for submarines like the Type 218SG have led to higher power demands. By improving energy plant output by using the MTU Series 12V 4000 engines, the Type 218SG is able to use upgraded sensors, and boost its C2 by increasing its communications bandwidth and integrating more systems into the CMS. As such, the MTU Series 12V 4000 diesel engine driven charging unit technology needs to adapt to the new requirements: firstly, more electrical power and secondly, provide rated power to fully utilize the Li-Ion advantages (when they mature and are available for sale).​
Two, the Fuel Cell system (FC System) is developed by HDW in Germany. The system uses 4th Generation Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells are electrochemical energy converters in which hydrogen ions and oxygen ions are combined to produce electrical charge. Similar to the Stirling engine, the FC system generates electricity at a slow and steady rate, suitable for low-speed submarine operations. For high-surge operations, the submarine relies on its regular battery system, which in turn is recharged by the FC system.​

Three, the German builders (also implemented in the U212A class diesel-electric submarines) overcame the lack of space in the submarines by modifying part of the sail fin to become an internal lock. Besides supporting the covert delivery and extraction process, the submarine has to allocate supporting resources to the SOF team, such as accommodation, food, stowage space for equipment, as well as mission planning and control areas. At the same time, the submarine has to maintain sufficient space for its own equipping needs to maintain its core fighting capability. It is difficult to optimise the small conventional submarines to support SOF operations while maintaining their core war fighting capability without a substantial increase in the submarines’ size. The torpedo room is designed such that the designated torpedo racks can be removed to allow the fitting of additional bunks for the SOF.
The Invincible class and its large flank array sonar needs sufficient electrical power for enhanced performance of its flank and towed array sonars. The Invincible class has classification sonar sensors in the low and ultra low frequency range, giving it an edge in its ability to compile a high resolution tactical picture when compared to our Archer-class and Challenger-class submarines.
The Invincible class will have integrated logistics support from the Germans, other suppliers and ST Marine. Because of importance of safety, a complete refit of each Swedish submarine (for even the newer Archer Class was required after six years service). This required stripping the hull of equipment and refurbishing each individual component before reassembly, which consumed millions labour hours in ST Marine's yard. The Singapore Navy understood that these refurbished submarines, were documented lightly (rather than extensively) and it was not uncommon for faulty components to be examined before appropriate repairs could be determined with parts ordered from Sweden, elsewhere or to be fabricated.
Modern combat systems and more capable sensors, with linkages to the RSN, will enable the new submarines to have improved wide-area awareness. Together with advanced automation and indigenously-developed sense-making systems in combat and platform suites, the new submarines will have enhanced situational awareness and accelerated decision-making support systems, allowing submariners to rapidly orientate themselves, decide on the best course of action, and act. The sense-making systems include data analytics and decision support engines developed by DSTA.
The Singapore DSTA’s Integrated Programme Management Team (IPMT) based in Germany adopted a system safety framework – one that incorporates the best elements of the Naval Sea System Command SUBSAFE programme and the United States Department of Defense System Safety approach (MIL-STD-882E) – to provide maximum assurance of the submarines’ safety. The IPMT comprised members from DSTA and the RSN. DSTA IPMT focuses on technical safety while the RSN crew focuses on operation safety. The TKMS engineers are responsible for the safe design and the implementation of the safety measures. The tripartite partnership allows a robust discussion on design safety, and checks and balances on the implementation of the safety measures. DSTA will ensure that maintainability for this class of submarines is taken to the next level by the contractors, including developing the required specialised industrial capacity for first level support for the sonar arrays and the combat management systems that we had input-in during its design.
 
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OPSSG

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On 27 August 2019, RSS Fearless, RSS Brave and RSS Dauntless were decommissioned at Tuas Naval Base in a ceremony. The retirement of the three 500 ton patrol vessels is part of a process that will see RSN switch to 8 littoral mission vessels (LMVs), all of which are in the water as of January 2019. Singapore started the LMV program in 2013 with the aim of replacing 11 Fearless-class vessels. Featuring a steel hull and a carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) superstructure to reduce topside weight, the 1,200 ton LMVs are expected to be fully operational by 2020. Each CFRP module was built by Saab Kockums and inspected by FMV in Sweden prior to delivery in Singapore (see: FMV - "Det är en ny roll för oss").

This leaves only RSS Gallant and RSS Freedom in service; and the 2 vessels will remain in service for an undeclared transitional role. For details see: Singapore decommissions three Fearless-class patrol vessels

Further, RSS Independence is modified with hull-strengthening strakes, to contribute to this LMV's robustness during incidents at sea which may involve ramming. More weapons and sensors are in the pipeline for installation on the LMVs, to increase the versatility of these vessels. These include, a 12-cell VL MICA system for each ship to be acquired and delivered at a later date.

Note on MICA NG: In July 2018, France announced the MICA New Generation programme, with two versions (IR or RF seeker), to be delivered between 2026 to 2031. This will allow France to replace current MICA missiles, which will be gradually phased out by 2030. The French Government considers the export capability of the new missiles, not only in the air-to-air but also in the ground-to-air version. The MICA NG is the first programme that will be launched within the 2019-25 military program law. In November 2018, MBDA signed a contract for the MICA NG missile for France with delivery starting in 2026. The contract also provides for royalties, as well as a mechanism for reducing the price of missiles acquired by France according to the number of missiles produced for export.
 
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OPSSG

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What will happen to the decommissioned ships? Will any of them be preserved?
Some of the Melara 76mm A-guns from the 11 Fearless class have been removed and re-used for the 8 Littoral Misson Vessel, but otherwise these vessels are preserved, as war reserves for at least for the next 5-6 years (see: Fearless-class sans 76mm).

IMO, the biggest problem Singapore has is the lack of manpower to keep it’s navy ships fully manned — which means more and more automation is needed in each vessel class replacement.
 
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John Fedup

The Bunker Group
Some of the Melara 76mm A-guns from the 11 Fearless class have been removed and re-used for the 8 Littoral Misson Vessel, but otherwise these vessels are preserved, as war reserves for at least for the next 5-6 years (see: Fearless-class sans 76mm).

IMO, the biggest problem Singapore has is the lack of manpower to keep it’s navy ships fully manned — which means more and more automation is needed in each vessel class replacement.

The manpower problem is a common to many modern navies. Automation addresses this but then more technically qualified crew personal are required and these people are sought after by the civilian sector. The concern about having enough crew for damage control is another issue. It is little wonder why unmanned naval vessels (surface and subsurface) are of increasing interest worldwide.
 

OPSSG

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The manpower problem is a common to many modern navies. Automation addresses this but then more technically qualified crew personal are required and these people are sought after by the civilian sector. The concern about having enough crew for damage control is another issue. It is little wonder why unmanned naval vessels (surface and subsurface) are of increasing interest worldwide.
It’s a never ending issue, despite the attempts to design, plan and train round the manpower shortage issue. While this means improving working conditions for navy crews, using an all NS crew for certain boats (or what other countries call naval reserves to crew) and use of conscripts for certain vocations (compliant VBSS, UAV crews and so on), it is even more serious given our small talent pool to draw from. In many ways, we can’t compete with navies that are growing regionally due to inherent limitations.

Singapore will invest in more capable ships but our depth of bench for experienced crew is limited — given poor retention rates.
 
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OPSSG

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The eighth and final Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV) on order for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has been moved to its home base, a representative from Singapore's Ministry of Defence told Jane's on 6 Nov 2019. The vessel, which will be in service as RSS Fearless once commissioned, arrived at its home port of Tuas Naval Base. This vessel is also equipped with hull-strengthening strakes, to contribute to this LMV's robustness during incidents at sea which may involve ramming.

On 7 Nov 2019, RSS Indomitable (a sister ship of RSS Fearless) along with vessels from the Singapore Civil Defence Force, Singapore Police Coast Guard rescued all 18 crew members of a Panama-flagged tanker, Hoyu, near Horsburgh Lighthouse, eastern Singapore Strait, after a fire. The Japanese owned Hoyu was en route from Singapore to the Philippines. Read more at Fire breaks out aboard tanker in Singapore waters off Pedra Branca: MPA
 
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OPSSG

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Does anyone know how much more life there is the Victory-class corvettes? I can't find any information on how long they were extended back in 2009. Now that the (younger) Fearless-class is being slowly replaced by the Independence-class, I'm wondering when the older corvettes will be getting a replacement.

Thanks
With regard to the Victory class replacement (namely, the MRCV), Rear-Admiral Lew Chuen Hong has said in Nov 2019: "We are now going through the detailed procedures to make sure that we plan and design her right, and we aim to have the first ship by the end of 2025, and to see her operational (by) 2027."

The end of life for Victory class should be in 2030 or thereabouts.
 
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OPSSG

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With regard to the Victory class replacement (namely, the MRCV), Rear-Admiral Lew Chuen Hong has said in Nov 2019: "We are now going through the detailed procedures to make sure that we plan and design her right, and we aim to have the first ship by the end of 2025, and to see her operational (by) 2027."

The end of life for Victory class should be in 2030 or thereabouts.
Mike Mills, Raytheon’s SPY-6 program director, told Seapower in a 14 Jan 2020 interview at the Surface Navy Association convention that Norway, Singapore and Japan have expressed interest in the radars. He said Raytheon hopes to land its first foreign military sale of the radars in 2020 or 2021. The SPY-6(V)1 Air and Missile Defense Radar is designed for the Navy’s Flight III Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers (DDGs) and features 37 radar modular assemblies (RMAs) in fixed arrays.

IMO, the SPY-6(V)1 Air and Missile Defense Radar is certainly a long-shot contender, viz a viz, Sea Fire 500 (which is compatible with the Aster missile family), for Singapore’s MRCV program (for 5,000 ton class vessels) that would commence building by 2025. Sea Fire is a multi function radar consisting in four non-rotating arrays and benefiting from the latest gallium nitride (GaN) high-power amplifier technology (similar to Raytheon SPY-6 family). Thales says its range and accuracy can support the full performance of current and future Aster missiles. Plus, the high refresh rate allows the Sea Fire to hold its ground against emerging threats such as highly maneuvering and hyper-velocity projectiles.
 
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StingrayOZ

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That is interesting. We have speculated before if Singapore might be interested in going Aegis. The adoption of a SPY-6 type radar would be a big move in that direction. But showing interest may just be a benchmarking concern at this stage. There seems to be a bit more openness now in terms of integration. Certainly I think it would be useful for Singapore to look at the capabilities on offer from multiple systems.
 

OPSSG

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That is interesting. We have speculated before if Singapore might be interested in going Aegis. The adoption of a SPY-6 type radar would be a big move in that direction. But showing interest may just be a benchmarking concern at this stage. There seems to be a bit more openness now in terms of integration. Certainly I think it would be useful for Singapore to look at the capabilities on offer from multiple systems.
Singapore’s DSTA would certainly have the MRCV designed with a SPY-6 series power and cooling requirements in mind. Aegis is a strong contender but the French would pull out all the stops to keep the Singapore Navy as a customer. Sea Fire is an attractive radar system not just for the MRCV but also as an upgrade path to the Herakles for the Formidable Class.
 
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Calculus

Active Member
Mike Mills, Raytheon’s SPY-6 program director, told Seapower in a 14 Jan 2020 interview at the Surface Navy Association convention that Norway, Singapore and Japan have expressed interest in the radars. He said Raytheon hopes to land its first foreign military sale of the radars in 2020 or 2021. The SPY-6(V)1 Air and Missile Defense Radar is designed for the Navy’s Flight III Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers (DDGs) and features 37 radar modular assemblies (RMAs) in fixed arrays.

IMO, the SPY-6(V)1 Air and Missile Defense Radar is certainly a long-shot contender, viz a viz, Sea Fire 500 (which is compatible with the Aster missile family), for Singapore’s MRCV program (for 5,000 ton class vessels) that would commence building by 2025. Sea Fire is a multi function radar consisting in four non-rotating arrays and benefiting from the latest gallium nitride (GaN) high-power amplifier technology (similar to Raytheon SPY-6 family). Thales says its range and accuracy can support the full performance of current and future Aster missiles. Plus, the high refresh rate allows the Sea Fire to hold its ground against emerging threats such as highly maneuvering and hyper-velocity projectiles.
Perhaps the SPY-6 variant referred to by Raytheon for Singapore is EASR (SPY-6(V)2 and SPY-6(V)3)...

Five fast facts about SPY-6 - What you need to know about the Navy's newest radar | Raytheon
 

OPSSG

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Perhaps the SPY-6 variant referred to by Raytheon for Singapore is EASR (SPY-6(V)2 and SPY-6(V)3)...

Five fast facts about SPY-6 - What you need to know about the Navy's newest radar | Raytheon
According to the latest Artist's rendition released by Mindef, the MRCV will have a 4 fixed faced radar.
  • Just realised that with 37 radar modular assemblies, SPY-6(V)1 is too big for even Flight IIA Burke destroyers (to be equipped with the 24-module variant of the SPY-6(V)4 radar that has four fixed faces) — the MRCVs are unlikely to have the space, power and cooling required to support SPY-6(V)1 (and found on Flight III Burke destroyers).
  • Two variants of the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar (from the AN/SPY-6 family), are being built:
(i) a single-face rotating array designated AN/SPY-6(V)2 for amphibious assault ships and Nimitz class carriers; and

(ii) a three fixed-face array designated AN/SPY-6(V)3 for Ford class aircraft carriers and the 20 future FFG(X) guided missile frigates — which I suspect is the correct radar array size to match the proposed MRCV (which is expected to be 130 metres in length and displace about 5,000 tons).​
That is interesting. We have speculated before if Singapore might be interested in going Aegis. The adoption of a SPY-6 type radar would be a big move in that direction. But showing interest may just be a benchmarking concern at this stage. There seems to be a bit more openness now in terms of integration. Certainly I think it would be useful for Singapore to look at the capabilities on offer from multiple systems.
In addition, US Navy’s Indo-Pacific Command will begin receiving the increased functionality of SPY-6 on the destroyers it already operates — giving the refitted destroyers a 30-fold increase in sensitivity, and permitting existing destroyers to detect and track items like stealthy drones and hypersonic glide weapons. The radars on multiple warships can also be networked to fashion a mega-array of sensors. The US Navy has a plan to begin equipping 15 “Flight IIA” Burke destroyers with the 24-module variant of the radar, with first delivery occurring in 2024; which gives this radar variant a production volume that the Sea Fire can’t hope to match.

But Thales and the French Government will have other tricks up their sleeves to entice DSTA and the Singapore Navy to select the Sea Fire 500 — which has started shore based testing. Sea Fire has started testing as a single array in early Sep 2019. A second array will be installed by Thales in 2020. The arrays are fitted on a full size mockup representative of the integrated mast (Panoramic Sensors and Intelligence Module) of the future French FDI frigate.
Raytheon is on contract with the US Navy to deliver 7 shipsets of SPY-6 radars. Now in production at Raytheon’s Andover, MA-based facility, AN/SPY-6(V)1 remains on schedule for delivery to the first DDG 51 Flight III, the future USS Jack H Lucas (DDG 125). The first delivery of AN/SPY-6(V)2 to LHA-8, the America Class Amphibious Assault Ship, is on plan for 2021. In Aug 2019, Raytheon and the U.S. Navy completed the first system-level tests of SPY-6(V)2, the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar, at the Surface Combat System Center at Wallops Island, VA.
 
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OPSSG

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The eighth and final Independence-class Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV) on order for the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) has been moved to its home base, a representative from Singapore's Ministry of Defence told Jane's on 6 Nov 2019. The vessel, which will be in service as RSS Fearless once commissioned, arrived at its home port of Tuas Naval Base. This vessel is also equipped with hull-strengthening strakes, to contribute to this LMV's robustness during incidents at sea which may involve ramming.

On 7 Nov 2019, RSS Indomitable (a sister ship of RSS Fearless) along with vessels from the Singapore Civil Defence Force, Singapore Police Coast Guard rescued all 18 crew members of a Panama-flagged tanker, Hoyu, near Horsburgh Lighthouse, eastern Singapore Strait, after a fire. The Japanese owned Hoyu was en route from Singapore to the Philippines. Read more at Fire breaks out aboard tanker in Singapore waters off Pedra Branca: MPA
1. All 8 Independence Class vessels have been commissioned on 31 Jan 2019, in just four and a half years since the launch of the first of the class. RSS Fortitude, RSS Dauntless and RSS Fearless are the final three LMVs that will replace the ageing Fearless-class Patrol Vessels, which have been in service for more than 20 years. Although the platform has been designed to embark a medium-lift helicopter on the flight deck, only lead ship Independence (15) and the last three ships in the class, Fortitude (20), Dauntless (21), and Fearless (22), will operate them. The remaining 4 vessels can only operate rotor-wing UAVs. See this Fact Sheet: Operationalisation of the Littoral Mission Vessel (LMV) Programme.


LMV Characteristics

Length : 80m
Beam : 12m
Draught : 3m
Displacement : 1250 tonnes
Speed : In excess of 27 knots
Endurance : 3500 nautical miles ( 14 days )
Complement : 23 ( including 5 Officers )
Engines : 4 x MTU 20V 4000 M93L diesel engines.
Configuration : Combined Diesel and Diesel ( CODAD )

Sensors : Thales NS100
Kelvin Hughes SharpEye Navigation Radar
Stelop Compass D Electro-Optic Director
Stelop 360 All-Round Surveillance System

Weapons : OTO Melara 76.2mm
Rafael 25mm Tyhoon RWS
2 x OTO Melara 12.7mm Hitrole RWS
12 x MDBA VL-Mica
2 x LRAD Long Range Acoustic Device
2 x Water Cannon System

Others : Heli-deck for a helicopter (on Independence (15), Fortitude (20), Dauntless (21), and Fearless (22))
Launch & Recovery for 2 x 11m RHIBs or USVs
2. When Singapore had a dispute with a immediate neighbour over territorial waters starting in Oct 2018, the navy’s LMVs were there to stand guard and defend Singapore’s sovereign rights. Further the LMVs conducted or participated in:
  • Search And Rescue (SAR) operations for the missing crew of JBB De Rong 19, after it collided with a tanker in Singapore waters in September 2017;
  • SAR operations for two men who went missing after their sampan (a small boat) capsized near the waters off Pedra Branca in December 2017;
  • Exercise APEX, a multi-agency maritime security exercise, in October 2018; and
  • Maritime security operations for the DPRK-US Singapore Summit in June 2018.
3. In a Mindef released picture at the commissioning of the final 3 LMVs, it shows all 8 fitted with:

(i) hull strengthening strakes, Water Cannons, and LRAD Long Range Acoustic Devices, should the need for ramming or such other non-lethal response arise;​

(ii) the newly installed 12 cell VL MICA naval canister / launcher. The full tactical VL Mica ammunition integrates a single missile all-up-round with a single-use autonomous firing and storage canister. The latter, 3.8m in length and weighing 368kg empty, is a sealed and pressurised dual-chamber enclosure designed with an integral ‘chimney’ duct so as to vent motor efflux upwards on launch. Aside from the ammunition canisters themselves, the only other below-decks equipment is the sequencer cabinet (containing power supplies and processing electronics). This is an electronic interface unit that links the VL Mica missiles with the ship combat management system (CMS), receives inputs from the ship inertial system, and provides the link to the Ship Missile Data Link (SMDL). The SMDL comprises a below-decks transmitter with four small uplink antennas fitted around the masthead; and

(iii) when paired with the NS100 — Thales' new generation of 3D air and surface surveillance naval radar which combines state of the art S Band Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) antenna technology and dual axis multi-beam processing — the VL MICA should provide the LMVs with anti-air protection out to a maximum range of 20km (with a smaller no escape zone of about 7km). The use of vertical launch, and the absence of dedicated target trackers, provides for a 360º engagement capability against multiple simultaneous targets. The NS100 has an instrumented range of 200km. It is capable of 3D air surveillance and weapon support for active missiles, 2D surface surveillance, surface gun fire support, jammer surveillance and IFF interrogation support. It has a physical dimension of 3m by 3m. Its MTBCF (mean time before critical failure) is 3000 hours.​

4. For background, I note that:

(i) on 24th April 2006, MBDA successfully carried out a test firing of the VL MICA air defence missile system from a naval launcher at the French DGA's (Délégation Générale pour l'Armement) CELM (Centre d'Essai de Lancement des Missiles) test facility;

(ii) on 6 Nov 2018, DGA awarded MBDA the contract for the MICA NG (Missile d’Interception et de Combat Aérien Nouvelle Génération) programme to develop the next generation of the MICA missile, with deliveries to France scheduled to begin in 2026. More specifically, the MICA NG‘s IR seeker will use a matrix sensor and the RF seeker will use a AESA sensor. The reduced volume of electronics will allow it to carry more propellant, and allow for a new double-pulse rocket motor in the same form factor. The contract also provides for royalties, as well as a mechanism for reducing the price of missiles acquired by France according to the number of missiles produced for export; and

(iii) the VL Mica has been selected for the Royal Malaysian Navy’s six-ship Second-Generation Patrol and the Indonesian Navy’s two-ship SIGMA 10514 Perusak Kawal Rudal (PKR) frigates.​
 
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OPSSG

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Amid a surge of piracy-related incidents, the Singapore government has announced plans to restructure its Maritime Security Task Force (MSTF) to better deal with the menace. On 3 Feb 2020, Defence Minister Dr Ng Eng Hen said that the MSTF plans to restructure to deal with piracy at sea, including beefing up its assets. He said "that review is expected to be complete in the next few months," and also that extra measures are useful to prevent a further rise in the number of sea robbery and piracy in the Singapore Strait. "Most recently, at the 14th Malacca Straits Patrol (MSP) Joint Coordination Committee meeting, the navies of Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand revised the MSP standard operating procedures to enhance the region's ability to tackle sea robbery in the Straits of Malacca and Singapore," he said.

In a separate written reply to Non-Constituency MP Dennis Tan, Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan explained that the Singapore Strait does not only include Singapore territorial waters, so the fight against piracy and armed robbery there requires "strong collaboration among all regional partners". In the last two months, there were 12 incidents in the Singapore Strait. "As none of these incidents occurred within Singapore territorial waters, no investigations were required of our agency. If an incident happens within Singapore territorial waters, the Singapore Police Coast Guard (PCG) will investigate where necessary," Mr Khaw added. Keeping in mind that the Singapore Strait is very crowded and has traffic separation. This video below explains the factors to consider for a bridge team.

This means the sea robbers or pirates are active in Indonesian territorial waters of the Singapore Strait — with the Indonesian navy unable or reluctant to act more effectively against these roving gangs of Indonesian sea robbers or pirates — despite the revised the MSP standard operating procedures. This is understandable given the limited resources of the Indonesian Navy compared to the vast Indonesian EEZ and territorial waters to patrol.

My guess is that the Singapore Navy has the option to increase patrols, by its fleet of:
  • eight 25m long Specialised Marine Craft (SMC);
  • eight 80m long littoral mission vessels (LMVs) and the addition of specific modules to 4 of these LMVs to better support MSTF taskings; and/or
  • the organic Scan Eagle UAVs on the Victory class corvettes and maritime Heron UAVs from the Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF),
on the Singapore Straits to provide better intelligence on the activities and methods of these gangs of Indonesian robbers or pirates. As Lieutenant Colonel (LTC) Tan Say Yong, Head SMC Group said: "Speed is critical for coastal interceptors; the craft must also be able to perform hard maneuvers." LTC Tan was involved in the design and construction of the SMC from the start of the project in 2003. The SMC is run by four sailors: a boat commander, coxswain, navigator and a weapons operator.

Dr Ng added that all robbers and pirates in the Singapore Strait so far are based and operate outside Singapore's territorial waters, and the Republic wants to share more information and intelligence with Malaysia and Indonesia. The Singapore Navy works with national agencies and international partners to ensure that all users can continue to access the sea unimpeded. At home, the SMCs and the LMVs deter and neutralise security threats, including maritime terrorism, together with other national agencies as part of the whole-of-government National Maritime Security System that is able to give Singapore better maritime domain awareness with the Fokker 50 Maritime Patrol Aircraft and Heron Maritime UAV.
 
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Ananda

Well-Known Member
This means the sea robbers or pirates are active in Indonesian territorial waters of the Singapore Strait — with the Indonesian navy unable or reluctant to act more effectively against these roving gangs of Indonesian sea robbers or pirates — despite the revised the MSP standard operating procedures. This is understandable given the limited resources of the Indonesian Navy compared to the vast Indonesian EEZ and territorial waters to patrol.
I believe the pirates gang uses Indonesian waters and islands chain in area near Batam and Bintan already happen since the time of British-Dutch rules. However if you see the recent spike of Pirates activities happen at the time Indonesian Navy and Coast Guard are preocupied in facing Ilegal Fishing in Natuna's water against Chinese 'Fishing Fleet' and Chinese Coast Guard.

Politically fishing protections and incursion of EEZ against Chinese Coast Guard and their 'fishing' fleet and on the occasion also from Vietnam are the political/public pressure that government face.

The Navy and Coast Guard/Bakamla and other martime agency face three political hot spot they have to prioritise, Natuna's Sea, Sulu Sea (bordering Philipines due some kindnapings done by Philipines based militants) and North Maluku sea line where some ilegal fishing happen.

Thus Singapore straits just down in priority at the moments. Also many politicians think that area like Singapore straits should not be handle by Navy, but by other Martime Agency like Maritime Police or the Coast Guard/Bakamla. This also push down Singapore Straits in my opinion on TNI-AL priority lists.
 

OPSSG

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Speaking in Parliament on Monday (2 Mar 2020) during the Committee of Supply Debates, Defence Minister Ng Eng Hen said that 4 Fearless class patrol vessels will be refurbished and pushed into service in support of the Maritime Security Task Force. For a start, four refurbished patrol vessels will be dedicated and deployed for "greater persistence" to protect Singapore's territorial waters Dr Ng said. See: S’pore to get new patrol ships following pirate attacks & intrusions into territorial waters

Thereafter 4 new purpose built patrol vessels will be built to secure our territorial waters. These new patrol vessels could be based on ST Marine’s Fearless 75 design. The 4 new vessels have similar design elements but will be different in fit-out from the Independence Class vessels (i.e. these should be considered a new class of ships from the Independence Class LMVs). Other than an indicative illustration, there are no further details on the design of the new class shared thus far.

Given the transnational nature of maritime threats, Singapore has reached out to Malaysia and Indonesia to propose that the Malacca Straits Patrol initiative be extended to other areas in addition to tackling piracy, Dr Ng said. Discussions are ongoing. The SAF is also restructuring its own military intelligence outfits so that counter-terrorism intelligence to detect, forewarn, and respond to terrorist plots are now part and parcel of its core missions to protect Singapore, he said.

Threats in the cyber domain was among three "clear and present" security threats that Dr Ng highlighted in his speech during the debate on his ministry's annual spending plans, along with maritime threats and terrorism.
 

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Gambit79

New Member
Hi ! But aren’t ST Marine focusing on the Vanguard series? OPV 80 perhaps from the Vanguard series? This announcement caught me by surprised as they have yet to release details of MRCV & JMMS
 

OPSSG

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Staff member
Prior to the LMVs (which will in future also replace the MCMVs), the Singapore Navy’s MSTF (previously called Coastal Command) had 4x Bedok Class MCMVs and 12 Fearless class vessels in its orbat (for a total fleet of 16 vessels). Therefore it does not surprise me that the navy would want 12 ships.
Hi ! But aren’t ST Marine focusing on the Vanguard series? OPV 80 perhaps from the Vanguard series? This announcement caught me by surprised as they have yet to release details of MRCV & JMMS
Currently, ST Marine’s Vanguard series are only design studies or paper designs (and you can choose to call it a Vanguard 80, except that we don’t know the actual length of this ship class, presently).

Oman actually bought 4 vessels of the Fearless 75 base design — this can be the basis for minor improvements after taking in Omani user feedback.

From the preliminary illustration released by Dr Ng, it seems the hull form is based on the LMV (but the top is different and has anti-ship missiles).
 
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Gambit79

New Member
Prior to the LMVs (which will in future also replace the MCMVs), the Singapore Navy’s MSTF (previously called Coastal Command) had 4x Bedok Class MCMVs and 12 Fearless class vessels in its orbat (for a total fleet of 16 vessels). Therefore it does not surprise me that the navy would want 12 ships.

Currently, ST Marine’s Vanguard series are only design studies or paper designs (and you can choose to call it a Vanguard 80, except that we don’t know the actual length of this ship class, presently).

Oman actually bought 4 vessels of the Fearless 75 base design — this can be the basis for minor improvements after taking in Omani user feedback.

From the preliminary illustration released by Dr Ng, it seems the hull form is based on the LMV (but the top is different and has anti-ship missiles).
Thanks for your input!
That makes logical sense of having 12 fleets but with anti ship missile?..more like an OPV.
I’m imagining the technological advancements for the plan MRCVs which likely to be more devastating than our already advanced Formidable frigates.
 
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