mars mission

crazydevil

New Member
what would be the minimum velocity increment required for a two impulse transfer from earth to mars about the sun??
 

StingrayOZ

Super Moderator
Staff member
what would be the minimum velocity increment required for a two impulse transfer from earth to mars about the sun??
Are you asking what would be the velocity for a simple earth - Mars journey? Unmanned, with no time pressure. You could do it over years, decades.

If you didn't have a two firing mission, then lowest energy would be the inter planetary transport network. I think the original NASA proposals had a possible Venus flyby so the direct route may not always be the best one to take.
 

crazydevil

New Member
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Are you asking what would be the velocity for a simple earth - Mars journey? Unmanned, with no time pressure. You could do it over years, decades.

If you didn't have a two firing mission, then lowest energy would be the inter planetary transport network. I think the original NASA proposals had a possible Venus flyby so the direct route may not always be the best one to take.
yes , im talking about simple earth mars journey with no time pressure based on hoffmans transfer.Neglection the escape velocity of earth, we can assume the unmanned aircraft rotating in earths orbit around the sun.From there , with two velocity increments , it can be transferred to the orbit around mars.If so what would be those velocity increments.(im just doing some theoretical work on the same and would love to have your inputs )
 

StingrayOZ

Super Moderator
Staff member
Its been ages since I studied orbital mechanics, I have a feeling its between 3-5.7km/s if you want a single shot from earth orbit. I see a bit of casual googling turns up loads of crap, I can see why your asking. I'll do a journal search at work and have a go at doing a napkin calculation.
 
yes , im talking about simple earth mars journey with no time pressure based on hoffmans transfer.Neglection the escape velocity of earth, we can assume the unmanned aircraft rotating in earths orbit around the sun.From there , with two velocity increments , it can be transferred to the orbit around mars.If so what would be those velocity increments.(im just doing some theoretical work on the same and would love to have your inputs )
Don't be lazy, just wiki "hoffman's transfer" and plug in the numbers, the formula is already there.
 

StingrayOZ

Super Moderator
Staff member
Hmm is this a home work question? Lack of context and how it structured implies yes.

If you are after the velocity required with instant velocity (ie unrealistic) then it is a simple application of the Hohman (as the new texts call it) orbit formula which is really just the conservation of energy.

Remember your changing orbits around the sun.

It however isn't the ideal equation to calculate interplanetary travel because it doesn't take in effect all of the factors that realistically happen.
 

crazydevil

New Member
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Hmm is this a home work question? Lack of context and how it structured implies yes.

If you are after the velocity required with instant velocity (ie unrealistic) then it is a simple application of the Hohman (as the new texts call it) orbit formula which is really just the conservation of energy.

Remember your changing orbits around the sun.

It however isn't the ideal equation to calculate interplanetary travel because it doesn't take in effect all of the factors that realistically happen.
.Ive been reading a little bit about interplanetary orbital transfers in MIT opencourse materials and juz want wanted to calculate theoretically the velocity increments needed for the transfer.I did some vague calculations and got first velcoity increment from orbit of earth around the sun to elliptcal orbit around the sun as 2.9km/s and then to an orbit of mars around the sun as 2.6km/sec(talking into consideration only the conservation of energy).But couldnt find any source to verify my answers.Further i want to add practcality into this theoretical speed to arrive at final speed required and would be great if you guyz could help me out:)
 

Sandhi Yudha

Active Member
In just three days two space probes were inserted in orbit into Mars, the American Maven (22 September) and two days later the Indian Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), also called Mangalyaan (24 September).

Maven's mission goals include determining how the Martian atmosphere and water, presumed to have once been substantial, were lost over time.

MOM has two objectives, first as a technology demonstrator, because its India's first space probe to Mars, and the secondary objective is to explore Mars' surface features, morphology, mineralogy and Martian atmosphere using indigenous scientific instruments. A great job done by the Indians, specially if you look to the quite young history of Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO).

NASA's Newest Mars Mission Spacecraft Enters Orbit around Red Planet -- ScienceDaily
India's First Mars Probe Makes Historic Red Planet Arrival

Hopefully these probes can finish their missions and provide us a lot of new information and knowledge.
 

Ananda

Well-Known Member
Yes, just visit some other forums where many comments either thrashing Indian achievements or just questioning why a 'poor' third world nation (neglecting India economy size), put so much money on this space program , not on social and poverty eradication.

This is great achievements for India, why some people simply can not accept that, is beyond me. They manage to send Mars orbiter for the first time and first try, with much cheaper budget than everybody else Mars budget. If that not great achievements for some people, then I don't know what to say.
 

Blackshoe

Defense Professional
Verified Defense Pro
Good! Now the ISRO can beg their officials for funds for more missions to Mars (ignoring potentially more productive mission areas) every two years (coincidentally, just within those officials' re-election pattern) just like NASA does./cynicism

Though, honestly, good on the ISRO and kudos for their accomplishment.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Active Member
The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and Schiaparelli lander were launched on 14 March 2016. In october 2016 the TGO entered Martian orbit, sadly the Schiaparelli lander crashed on Mars after collecting 600Mb of data.

The second part of the ExoMars programme was planned to be launched in July 2020, but the bad news is that the launch is postponed until 2022.
 
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