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UK Defence Force General discussion

Discussion in 'Geostrategic Issues' started by t68, Jan 10, 2019.

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  1. t68

    t68 Well-Known Member

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  2. t68

    t68 Well-Known Member

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  3. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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    I always thought defence was the the best tool to negotiate a decent trade relationship with the EU after Brexit. Apparently May was incapable of figuring this out and caved in to the EU. Simple approach, no trade deal, no defence relationship and maybe no continued NATO membership. With questionable NATO support from the US, the EU might have to look after themselves. At that point, a favourable deal for the UK looks like a better option for the EU
     
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  4. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Sir Humphrey explains it quite eloquently.

     
  5. Ocean1Curse

    Ocean1Curse Member

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    As an outsider looking in the U.K. is scheduled to leave the EU on the 29 of March 2019. That just leaves a hard BREXIT. What's in the U.K. favour is they've still got the £pound so a recession on the €uro won't hit the U.K. as hard as it will hit Europe.

    This idea of a hard BREXIT is a wives tale IMO. Britain has already turned its manufacturing into an industrial wast land, that's fundamentally what kicked off the leave campaign in the first place so they've already done there hard BREXIT.

    At least when there's a hard BREXIT the £pound will fall again and that will give UK manufacturing and business the badly needed boost it needs which relative to EU problems is a minor issue.
     
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  6. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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  7. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Maybe time has come for such realpolitik as May's BREXIT deal got thrashed in Parliament: PM’s Brexit deal rejected by huge margin It was a real cricket score - an innings defeat and some. Trouble is whether or not the Europeans would react as the US & UK would expect is a completely different story. They may in fact give the US & UK the one fingered salute, go ahead with their European Force concept and with NATO out of the way, structure it as they see fit without interference from perfidious Albion and meddling from across the Atlantic. They have the French nuclear deterrent and if push comes to shove, Germany and a couple of other Euro-nations would be quite capable of going nuclear. Ironically the actual "loser" would be the UK with the US retreating from European affairs. But would the UK be the loser? From the European POV definitely yes, but I think not because they would be free of the clutches of Brussels based bureaucrats, retain sovereignty over their forces and defence policy etc., retain the freedom to act in their own interests, and most importantly of all, their military customs, history and culture are not subsumed amongst a plethora of multiple competing military histories and cultures.
     
  8. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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  9. StingrayOZ

    StingrayOZ Well-Known Member

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    I disagree. France has always had its nuclear deterrent outside of NATO, and I don't see them playing nicer in a Euro force in that regard. France is France, coalition wise, they are in a different dimension.

    Germany I don't think can go nuclear. Well of course they have the technical capability and the industrial capability, but they don't have the moral and ethical confidence to wield that kind of power. It would be more likely the Dutch or someone else would have to bear that burden.

    For Britain it is probably a chance to look at a closer military alliance with a new set of friends. Britain is a significant power in its own right, so I don't think from the military perspective there is an issue for the UK.

    Economically, Brexit is likely to hurt the economy, deal or no deal exit. That is likely going to impact the budgets at least in the short term. I worry about big military acquisitions in the near future.
     
  10. KiwiRob

    KiwiRob Active Member

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    What an absolute crock of poo article. Britain's motor manufacturers are already leaving, buying an Andriod phone in a UK airport isn't going to make android apps fee free because the user will have an account for their phone in an EU country, UBER and LUFT still have to purchase vehicles to perform their job, to move away from private owners owning vehicles there will need to be millions of private hire cars to take their place. Online shopping kills local shopping and replaces many high street jobs with far fewer distribution hub and delivery driver jobs, which is worse for the economy. An the final kicker EU nationals aren't rushing to get into the EU they are leaving in there thousands everyday.
     
  11. ASSAIL

    ASSAIL Defense Professional Verified Defense Pro

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    PM May sacked her Defence Secretary today over his criticism of the Huawei involvement in the UKs 5G network.
    I haven’t heard any further commentary here.
    Have the Brits taken this with a bit of a yawn or is there likely to be repercussion

    Mods I put this here because I couldn’t find a general Brit Defence thread and it’s more about the UK forces than Huawei.
    Sorry folks, I didn’t look hard enough, it’s late, Mods could you pls move to UK Defence thread
     
  12. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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    I posted a link in the Huawei thread which I think is where it belongs but the Mods can decide.
     
  13. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    The pommy Conservative Party have promised "extensive review integrating defence, security and foreign policy" if elected. Apparently the Labour Party have promised a defence review as well. We know where the Labour Party one would lead, especially a Corbyn lead one. However, a Johnson lead govt is another story. Would Boris adhere to the recent Conservative mantra of austerity or would he be bold, change and spend on defence? The election is 8 days away, so we don't have long to wait for a result.

    UK Conservatives propose far-reaching defense review if elected
     
  14. Hone C

    Hone C Member

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    Boris' manifesto promise is to "continue to excede the NATO target of 2% of GDP" on defence and to increase the defence budget by "at least .5% above inflation each year."
    Aside from the fact that the 2% of GDP figure is only achieved through some creative accounting, funding does look set to increase under a Conservative government. Its certainly not comparible to the huge sums being promised to the NHS however; as in most Western democracies there is simply not enough appetite from the electorate for large increases to defence spending. The impact to the UK's finances post Brexit is another factor, especially in the short-medium term.
    As you say Ngati, only another week before we find out one way or another.
     
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