Space Shuttle Replacement?

StobieWan

Super Moderator
Staff member
Well, *most* of it worked as a test - looks like a bad data link and some setup information that was slightly incorrect, leading to the capsule attempting to correct a positional error that could have been corrected if it'd been crewed. It went up, nearly made RV, and got back down again very accurately (on a runway threshold in fact!)

If it'd not been for recent reversals for Boeing, they'd have skated with that one quite nicely I think.
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
Agreed, but the reversals just seem to keep on coming so even minor screw-ups by Boeing will now be magnified by the media and public. They kind of deserve it IMHO.
 

Ananda

The Bunker Group
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  • #45

Found this Video of Chrysler Space Shuttle concept. It's like Flying mushroom or Flying Piramide..depend on how you look it.

Interesting concept.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
The test flight of Starship SN10 went actually smoothly.
But there seems to be a methane leak and the Starship also landed in a leaned position....and 8 minutes after landing....

It is unclear yet if there was a problem with one of the landing legs.




Explosion around 10:39:05
 
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Ananda

The Bunker Group
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  • #49
Well @John Fedup it didn't failed. It's done most of the plan flight and the decent path is also good. Something wrong on the landing, seems some landing procedures did not execute as plan.

Still it's big achievement. Anyway if this's going to be used for man flight, it'll need some work to be done on the landing execution. Also how to fail safe the leak, as the leak seems that create the explosion.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
Well @John Fedup it didn't failed. It's done most of the plan flight and the decent path is also good. Something wrong on the landing, seems some landing procedures did not execute as plan.

Still it's big achievement. Anyway if this's going to be used for man flight, it'll need some work to be done on the landing execution. Also how to fail safe the leak, as the leak seems that create the explosion.
Technically the testflight was successful, but it is a little bit painful if a crewed Starship decides to perform a Spontaneous Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly after landing, specially if it is surrounded by staff and international press.

This flight is planned for 2023.

But i think it is more likely that the mission will have some delay.
 

Black Jack Shellac

Active Member
The test flight of Starship SN10 went actually smoothly.
But there seems to be a methane leak and the Starship also landed in a leaned position....and 8 minutes after landing....

It is unclear yet if there was a problem with one of the landing legs.
I believe the landing legs are disposable. They have not designed the permanent ones yet and so the ones they have are designed to crush to absorb the shock of landing.
 

Feanor

Super Moderator
Staff member
Technically the testflight was successful, but it is a little bit painful if a crewed Starship decides to perform a Spontaneous Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly after landing, specially if it is surrounded by staff and international press.
This just means you have to disembark and leave the landing site quickly, after the flight. :D

This flight is planned for 2023.

But i think it is more likely that the mission will have some delay.
I'm curious to see what happens. There is a whole slew of future moon missions in various formats planned, including Turkish, Russian, Chinese, American, European... at least two of them seem to involve some sort of permanent lunar presence; American and Russian or Russo-Chinese depending on who you ask. I can't help but wonder if private missions will fall in line with national space programs, or if we will end up with a hodge-podge of private and government activity.
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
This just means you have to disembark and leave the landing site quickly, after the flight. :D



I'm curious to see what happens. There is a whole slew of future moon missions in various formats planned, including Turkish, Russian, Chinese, American, European... at least two of them seem to involve some sort of permanent lunar presence; American and Russian or Russo-Chinese depending on who you ask. I can't help but wonder if private missions will fall in line with national space programs, or if we will end up with a hodge-podge of private and government activity.
Perhaps future episodes of “For All Mankind” will answer the question.;) Lunar activity over the next 4-6 years will be very interesting to watch. I think significant stuff has to happen on the moon for a future Mars mission (for instance, electrolysis of ice for oxygen and hydrogen for fuel and life support).
 

Ananda

The Bunker Group
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  • #54

Video in Virgin Galactic first full flight to edge of space. Not this's going to be used as space shuttle replacement. However put it in this thread as this is part of commercial development toward regular maned flight within lower atmosphere.

Once commercial business shown it's relatively affordable within business boundaries, then space flight can really take off commercially.
 

FormerDirtDart

Well-Known Member

Video in Virgin Galactic first full flight to edge of space. Not this's going to be used as space shuttle replacement. However put it in this thread as this is part of commercial development toward regular maned flight within lower atmosphere.

Once commercial business shown it's relatively affordable within business boundaries, then space flight can really take off commercially.
This was the VSS Unity's first spaceflight "from New Mexico"
The ship has previously reached space on 13 Dec 2018 and 22 Feb 2019. Those flights originated from California, and the Feb 2019 flight reached the highest altitude of the three.
 

Terran

Active Member
In practical aspects the Virgin Galactic’s program is just a joy ride. The only potential actual value might be as a training tool for Astronauts. It and New Shepherd basically could be used to “Cherry bust” trainee astronauts by giving them a real low cost mission experience of a actual flight.
From a tourist standpoint it’s a fast thrill ride. The most expensive roller coaster ride on the planet. From a financial standpoint it’s not great. Branson has been selling it for years yet after the VSS Enterprise incident the company is on the rocks. It hasn’t launched promised rides its years behind schedule. It’s bordering on snake oil. With Blue Origin working up fast and the current state of Virgin Galactic, one wonders just how much of a future this actually has.
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
The crew on the ISS must be shaking their heads. After the last thruster error on a Russian vehicle that spun the station, don’t think the enthusiasm for Boeing’s latest wonder tech is very high.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
So thanks to the technical problems during Nauka's voyage to the ISS, Boeing has found technical malfunctions after the planned launch date on its Starliner. They are already trying for a couple of days to solve the problems, but it seems because of this there will be an extended delay for a couple of months.


Here a more detailed report about the Starliner.
 
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