USAF News and Discussion

OPSSG

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Staff member
I would add that the B-21 is anticipated to have a significantly smaller payload than the B-2, which has a significantly smaller payload than the B-1. So, it's pretty reasonable to expect a better than 1:1 number of airframes to be desired. Plus with ~100 B-21 replacing ~80 B-1/B-2 there will still be a savings in aircrew personnel required to man an increased number of aircraft.
Agreed, the B-21 carries only half the payload of a B-2.

The Raider's curvature profile within the fuselage, often referred to as the chine, appears sleeker than the B-2, potentially reducing the aircraft's radar cross-section. The latest updated rendering follows 3 released in 2020.

In its latest factsheet, the Air Force put the average B-21 cost at US$639 million -- or US$673 million today due to inflation. Richard Aboulafia, vice president and analyst at the Teal Group, said that those numbers are only one part of the total purchase price and do not include supporting equipment, among other items.
 
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ngatimozart

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Verified Defense Pro
Agreed, the B-21 carries only half the payload of a B-2.

The Raider's curvature profile within the fuselage, often referred to as the chine, appears sleeker than the B-2, potentially reducing the aircraft's radar cross-section. The latest updated rendering follows 3 released in 2020.

In its latest factsheet, the Air Force put the average B-21 cost at US$639 million -- or US$673 million today due to inflation. Richard Aboulafia, vice president and analyst at the Teal Group, said that those numbers are only one part of the total purchase price and do not include supporting equipment, among other items.
You can buy a frigate for that amount of money. Or a helluva lot of Ferraris. So basically it's around US$1 billion per aircraft, give or take, when you include all the other costs.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
You can buy a frigate for that amount of money. Or a helluva lot of Ferraris. So basically it's around US$1 billion per aircraft, give or take, when you include all the other costs.
So basically for more money you get less aircraft...


Something else.

They do not tell from which block these 2 F-16s will be, but i expect it will be one single seat and one twin seat.
 

ngatimozart

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So basically for more money you get less aircraft...


Something else.

They do not tell from which block these 2 F-16s will be, but i expect it will be one single seat and one twin seat.
I do like the digital twinning concept because it saves money and time. Hopefully Boeing did it with the F-15EX. Doing it with the F-16 makes a lot of sense. I would hazard a guess that the aircraft are a C and D variant possibility around the Block 30 or Block 50 mark. The USAF has long retired its A and B variants.
 

ngatimozart

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Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
The USAF AFRL has been working on a a project to counter drone swarms and has developed THOR which sends out an electronic pulse that fries the complete drone swarm electronics. It is working on a smaller version called MJOLNIR which is more mobile than THOR.

 

south

Active Member

An article explaining some of the complexity of operations over Iraq and Syria around the 2017/201& period, and how the fight was not just with IS, but was a great power conflict below the threshold of war.

While it is USAF centric, it should be viewed as the western Air Forces, rather than just USAF.
 

FormerDirtDart

Well-Known Member
As USAF related posting this here from the General Aviation thread
Essentially USTRANSCOM has issued a warning order to members of the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) for possible activation.
Most likely to transship evacuees from locations outside of Afghanistan. While military airlift would continue to do the evacuations from Kabul.
 

FormerDirtDart

Well-Known Member
AFSOC hopes to have a flying prototype within 17 months. Current plan appears to envision removable pontoons. The aggressive development plans is relying on using digital design, virtual reality modeling and computer-aided designs
AFSOC has been working with the Air Force Research Laboratory's Strategic Development Planning and Experimentation directorate, as well as defense contractors, on the amphibious modifications.

The prototypes for the modified plane are being tested virtually on the Digital Proving Ground, using digital design, virtual reality modeling and computer-aided designs, AFSOC said. The hope is this will allow the project to use digital simulation, testing and advanced manufacturing to quickly create and test physical prototypes.

"Being able to experiment with existing technology to evaluate design tradeoffs and test a new system before ever bending metal is a game-changer," said Maj. Kristen Cepak, AFSOC's technology transition branch chief, in the press release.
 

FormerDirtDart

Well-Known Member
AFSOC hopes to have a flying prototype within 17 months. Current plan appears to envision removable pontoons. The aggressive development plans is relying on using digital design, virtual reality modeling and computer-aided designs
919th Special Operations Wing has posted an article which essentially covers information already being reported on. But, they've included a series of concept/design images
Just a touch to wet your whistle. If you want to see more you're gonna need to give the USAF their page veiws too.
LOL
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