The best weapon for after the apocalypse

Locarnus

New Member
what about a bow for the range weapon?
self made ammo would be useful
and the low noise too, compared to firearms

and with a compound bow, u have quite some firepower/range

or that: :hul
 

regstrup

Member
But they had a finite war. You have an infinite survival.
Isen't war and survival two sides of the same ting ;)

But still I won't change anything on my list. In this sort of scenario I think, that it wont be the one, with the most firepower, who will survive, but the on with the most stable tecnoligy.
 

Marc 1

Defense Professional
Verified Defense Pro
What's all this talk about "sporks"? Bloody fairy devices...

The device I'm thinking about is invaluable as a screwdriver, bottle opener, can opener, spoon - and I'm sure it has additional uses too as an entrenching tool, battle weapon, slide rule, used in basic computing and is even usable as currency.

The Ultimate survival tool: [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_Ration_Eating_Device"]Field Ration Eating Device - Wikipedia, the free [email protected]@[email protected]@/wiki/File:FRED-US_Dollar.jpg" class="image"><img alt="" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/64/FRED-US_Dollar.jpg/220px-FRED-US_Dollar.jpg"@@[email protected]@en/thumb/6/64/FRED-US_Dollar.jpg/220px-FRED-US_Dollar.jpg[/ame]

The FRED!:D
 

outrider

New Member
Ok here is a little game: Some apocalypse happended, civilization is crushed, everyone is on its own, bla bla bla, yadda yadda yadda.

So, you get to choose between every gun in the world to be your weapon during the march through the wastelands. If you choose something out of the "machine-gun"-category you get three spare magazines, with an (assault)rifle or shotgun five magazines, clips, or boxes of shotgun shells (30 shells), and both seven with an (automatic)pistol or submachine-gun.

Which weapon would you choose? You have to think about it; Which is the sturdiest, which the most practical? Which offers the greatest firepower to set yourself apart from the other strugglers?

You may run over some weapons-oil during your voyage, but dont excpect any spare-parts or expert repairkits. You might get some ammunition though, but only widely used civilian calibers like 9mm, .223, etc.


For such a scenario I don't think superior fire power to be the primary concern but rather versatility.

I think the best weapon in such a situation would be a head full of knowledge.
 

AMERICANMAN

Banned Member
For such a scenario I don't think superior fire power to be the primary concern but rather versatility.

I think the best weapon in such a situation would be a head full of knowledge.
My weapon of choice has allways been a 12 gauge pump shotgun, wiht a rattlesnake load , alternate buckshot and pumpkin balls.
 

dmied1

New Member
Saiga

i would take a saiga 12. based off the avtomat kalashnikov and sharing majority of parts commonality. A damn accurate, reliable, fast shooting, fast reloading shotgun. this things accurate with buckshot at 20 metres, never mind sluggers. if it ever breaks, and thats if, then the nearest ak dropped by your enemies should carry the part you need. an excellent weapon, well suited to any need, fully compatible with cobra sights and even pso-1's
 

survivalkid

New Member
Sling

I believe after an apocalyptic event the most valuable weapon is one that ammunition is all around like a bow or in my case a sling

Advantages:
never ending supply of ammunition
range
DisAdvantages:
accuracy takes time to practice
 

My2Cents

Active Member
For a non-projectile weapon the broad axe is the best choice, principally because it is the most useful tool as well. Note, this is not the Dane axe, which is designed a weapon.

If you could have only one tool and had to go into the wilderness, this is it.
 

PCShogun

New Member
I like my old Mosin Nagant bolt actions. 15 million plus were made. The ammo is still made. Its so simple its nearly impossible to break, has a long range, penetrates through most mobile and vinyl sided homes, and the 18" bayonet works regardless of ammo. It also doubles as a tent stake, hotdog roaster, back scratcher, and roasting spit. The stock itself can be used for firewood to last for two days.
 

Todjaeger

Potstirrer
Sea sprite, Tiger, MRH. Not a good procurement record. Seasprite 100% our fault. Can we put the others down to French engineers? Have you hear about heaven and hell?

in heaven the French are the cooks, the Italians the lovers, the English the police, the Germans the engineers and the Swiss run the place.

In hell the Swiss are the cooks, the English the lovers, the Germans the police, the French are the engineers and the Italians run the place.

The French do have a car ...the Renault that has a car jack as it’s emblem.Renault
I have heard a variant of that. Main differences being that in the version I had heard, Hell was staffed slightly differently.

In Hell, the English are the cooks, the French the mechanics, the Germans the police, the Swiss are the lovers, and the Italians run everything...
 

Bob53

Active Member
I have heard a variant of that. Main differences being that in the version I had heard, Hell was staffed slightly differently.

In Hell, the English are the cooks, the French the mechanics, the Germans the police, the Swiss are the lovers, and the Italians run everything...
You ever been to Switzerland and eaten the food? On the other hand …. Jamie, Nigella , Gordon…
 

IHFP

New Member
It is possible that the problem could "solve itself" as you suggest. It is also quite possible that the exact opposite could occur. If there are only a few people involved, then existing supplies of raw/recycled materials could sustain production for a considerable duration. The downside here is that if only a few people are involved in such manufacture, then there would consequently be a relatively low output in terms ammunition produced.

Now if the facilities were in place to allow large scale production of ammunition, the facilities would most likely rapidly consume most ready supplies of recycled materials and thus need inputs of new raw materials to sustain production, which then would trigger the need for additional resources and labour, etc.

One must remember that if there were to be some form of large scale event or series of events that might be considered the "apocalypes", this would cause a breakdown of the interconnected global economy and disrupt flow of raw materials and finished goods. Depending on the materials and goods, as well as the area(s) in question, the effects could have a rapid onset or might be more gradual. Just the scope of JIT (Just In Time) supply/demand delivery that is in effect within much of the more developed world, many areas would have a more rapid onset.

Here is an interesting (or perhaps alarming) American-centric statistic. On average, the food an average American consumes today travelled ~1,000 - 1,100 miles from where it was grown to reach the person who will consume it. Now consider the broad implications of that situation. On the one hand, by drawing on food grown from so "far" away, it means that there is a large area of potential agricultural activity so that positive/negative impacts in specific areas/regions would average out, i.e. if there is flooding in some areas of the Mississippi River basin which damages the corn crop, then rice and/or potatoes grown in other areas not subjected to flood could make up for the loss of corn in the food supply. Such a situation is subject though to the overall food supply and commerce/transportation systems functioning. When it works, it works great.

In the case of an apocalypse-type situation, a breakdown in the supply of a single commodity like petroleum (fuel) can cause large-scale disruption every other commodity, nevermind the impact of a breakdown in supplying necessities.

What would happen to the normal food supply most Americans are used to purchasing at their local grocery and/or supermarket in the event of a breakdown in the fuel supply would look something like this. If there was a complete disruption in fuel, then the normal food delivery cycle would immediately change. Instead of stores being re-supplied from regional warehouses on a daily (nightly) basis, deliveries would either cease immediately or be significantly curtailed in attempts to 'stretch' the fuel supply. At the same time though, the restocking shipments to the various warehouses would be similarly impacted. In rapid order, the food demands of urban/suburban areas would outstrip the available supply, as well as the sustainable level of resupply from outlying areas. This difference would impact the population of the affected area(s) via inducing migration to other areas, large scale decline in health/well-being and triggering fierce competition for the available foodstocks.

The example I gave of problems with maintaining a supply of brass 5.56 x 45 mm bullet casings would be affected too. In order for production to be maintained, the producer of the casings need to have/sustain a source of food, which means either they produce the cases, but only at a very low rate, with much/all of the rest of the time being concerned with providing food. As more production is desired, the more people get added in various areas and at differing levels. At a basic level, farmers are required to feed the population, but if complex machinery is utilized, then technicians and mechanics are required to support the machine and they would also need to have food sources, which means even greater numbers of farmers. As more people and/or complicated systems are added, the greater the demands for food and other materials get. Which means that more farmers are needed to meet the area demand for fuel.


Sorry, am beat now. Will attempt to resume & finish later.

-Cheers
With the current geo-political and military situation being the way it is. I think perhaps we should see if we have exausted the tactical benifits of the TS (Titanium "Spork"). Sure its been around a decade since this threat was started but now is the time to reflect on how it can be used in an end of the world situation. I may have not been in the military or be able to contribute to about 99% of the other threads without setting off a moderator. But I have been camping and let me tell you this is not only an offensive tool but also its a great way to keep your fingers from getting sticky when your trying to get at the good bits at the bottom of your food pouch. Please moderators I don't wanna go out like this. I have learnt my lesson and understand that citing "wikipedia" is NOT acceptible. So here is a link for others if you want to learn about Spork - Wikipedia
 
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ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
With the current geo-political and military situation being the way it is. I think perhaps we should see if we have exausted the tactical benifits of the TS (Titanium "Spork"). Sure its been around a decade since this threat was started but now is the time to reflect on how it can be used in an end of the world situation. I may have not been in the military or be able to contribute to about 99% of the other threads without setting off a moderator. But I have been camping and let me tell you this is not only an offensive tool but also its a great way to keep your fingers from getting sticky when your trying to get at the good bits at the bottom of your food pouch. Please moderators I don't wanna go out like this. I have learnt my lesson and understand that citing "wikipedia" is NOT acceptible. So here is a link for others if you want to learn about Spork - Wikipedia
It's always useful as long as you keep it very sharp. But since there's no room for a flux capacitor it's not much use. :D
 

IHFP

New Member
It's always useful as long as you keep it very sharp. But since there's no room for a flux capacitor it's not much use. :D
Thats an interesting point you have there Ngatimozart. The titanium spork probably would be my first choise if I was in a toe to toe confrontation with a grizzly bear. The sharpend spork might be TOO dangerous for the untrained, civilian types. If you keep it in your back pocket it could wear through the fabric eventually *OUCH* heh.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Thats an interesting point you have there Ngatimozart. The titanium spork probably would be my first choise if I was in a toe to toe confrontation with a grizzly bear. The sharpend spork might be TOO dangerous for the untrained, civilian types. If you keep it in your back pocket it could wear through the fabric eventually *OUCH* heh.
I have never met a grizzly bear. Would like to though. A friend who was in Oregon once, told me that the locals thought us Kiwis really mad because we wanted to go out into the bush and find bears to see them. He said that thee locals reckoned no sane person went into the bush purposely looking for bears. But we don't have bears here so they are a novelty to us. We did have people on the West Coast of the US leaping out of helicopters onto deer and other wild herbivores such as moose, in order to capture and tag them for your Wildlife people. It's something that we pioneered here back in the 1970s when live deer capture started up for venison farming.
 

Antipode

Member
As a spork ignorant, european, solo traveller:

-Long arms: 12 gauge, pump action shotgun, any MILSPEC Mossberg ideally, for it’s sturdiness. You can find rounds from fancy homes to the smallest guard posts, and even sport gear venues that don’t sell fire guns. It is solid for clearing indoors as well, much better than a bolt action rifle.

00 9 pellets buckshot normally, birdshot and slugs to hunt. There are Dragonsbreath rounds and whatnot, but those three types are common enough.

A flashlight attached, and a pointy end if you take the Retrograde (wich is quite long already, though).

-Short arms: A .357 Magnum/.38 special, 4” revolver. Regardless of it’s strong points in a situation like that (simple, robust, always ready), if I’m gonna be hunted down by cannibals, let it go down in style.

A good quality crowbar, medium sized. Plonk.
 
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