South Korean Navy

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
Once in service, the 120 m long 5600 ton Ganghwado, which has an overall beam of 19 m, will supplement the 103 m-long, 3200-ton Cheonghaejin auxiliary submarine rescue ship, which was commissioned into the RoKN in November 1996 and is able to operate in waves of 2 m or smaller.
So the South-Korean Navy will soon have two submarine rescue ships.



 

Redlands18

Well-Known Member
Good article including a Video from Navalnews on the ROKNs Light Carrier Project. Very interesting design from HHI which has partnered with Babcock. DSME signed a similar alliance with Fincantieri at MADEX 2021.
Will be an interesting competition, they are both between 35,000-45,000t able to operate around 30 manned Aircraft and the HHI design includes a separate Flight deck for UAVs
 

Ananda

The Bunker Group

ROKN release CG video on their future CG operation. The design for their future Light Carrier from my understanding not yet finish. This seems this CG just shown more on the concept om how it will be used in the future.

This video more on public display from ROKN Naval week.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
South Korea was set Tuesday to hold a ceremony launching a new frigate named after the PCC-772 Cheonan, a Pohang Class corvette torpedoed by North Korea in 2010.

The ceremony for the 122 meter long Deagu Class/Incheon Batch II/FFX-II frigate FFG-826 Cheonan, was scheduled to take place at the shipyard of Hyundai Heavy Industries Co. in Ulsan, some 410 kilometers southeast of Seoul.

 

Ananda

The Bunker Group

South Korea effort on building their own AIP. While in Indonesia (as ROK first Submarine export customer), Euro Sales guys continue their public effort to downgrade ROK design submarines.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
|“Light aircraft carriers are unnecessary in our security environment. The light carrier gives us no substantive advantage in terms of military strategy and operations; the carrier will be nothing more than a ‘money-eating hippopotamus’.”|

But still, the new defence budget for 2022 is approved by the National Assembly, including the budget for the new aircraft carrier program.

 

Meriv90

Active Member

The ROK Navy found defects in the cables of the inverter module, one of the central components in the propulsion system, aboard ROKS Son Won-il, ROKS Yoon Bong-gil, and ROKS Yoo Gwan-soon. These are the first, fifth, and sixth boats of the class. Each submarine will have to go through a complex overhaul to receive repairs. This will immobilize each vessel at least four months.

To make matters worse, the inverter modules, produced by Siemens, cannot be fixed in Korean shipyards due to legal barriers concerning technology transfers and intellectual property. Therefore, the parts will need to be shipped to Germany for repairs, with the round way trip expected to last 2 months, leading to each submarine being out of action for at least 6 months.
@Meriv90 You been them them Italian grapes again? Didn't your mama tell you that it was bad for you and make you forgetful? Or is that marriage, I can never remember which. Anyway you forgot to comment after the copy and paste. Do it again and the moderators might have to put you on a diet of English food and wine.

Ngatimozart.
 
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Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
Initial AESA radar development by Hanwha Systems was for South Korea’s KF-X/KF-21 domestic stealth fighter projects. The KF-X project is an ambitious, huge, complicated and expensive project, but the knowledge and expertise learned in this project also contributes to other defence programs.

 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Looks like the future of the ROKN CVX maybe in doubt. The incoming Minister of Defence has expressed reservations about the program saying:

“There are diverse opinions on the CVX program. I think we need to carefully evaluate our priorities by taking into account several factors including strategic and tactical operational doctrines, military requirements, national interest, and cost efficiency,” .

The program has been controversial within SK and the incoming governing party has been highly critical of it. This will be an interesting development to follow.

South Korea's next Defense Minister Expresses Reservations on CVX program - Naval News
 

Ananda

The Bunker Group
20220704144502.jpg

Some Korean defense analyst seems trying to argue instead going with F-35B, better to build the capacity of CVX with KF-21 navalised version. This's coming from article in Bemil Chosun.

The image seems building something closer to what French has in mind. Double catapults CATOBAR. This argument if I read basically base on developing KF-21 navalised version will be more beneficial then F-35B. Off course this in fact increase the dimensions on previous design that utilise 20 F-35B.

 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
View attachment 49483

Some Korean defense analyst seems trying to argue instead going with F-35B, better to build the capacity of CVX with KF-21 navalised version. This's coming from article in Bemil Chosun.

The image seems building something closer to what French has in mind. Double catapults CATOBAR. This argument if I read basically base on developing KF-21 navalised version will be more beneficial then F-35B. Off course this in fact increase the dimensions on previous design that utilise 20 F-35B.

Some merit in a CATOBAR alternative like Hawkeye, F-35C as addition to navalized KF-21s and acquisition of MQ-25s (last item probably unlikely). Is the carrier project something SK needs or is it a counter to Japanese naval aviation efforts?
 

swerve

Super Moderator
I think it's largely a national pride thing. If Japan can build aircraft carriers, so can we! The CONOPS seems rather vague. I can see a use, though: an airfield that's harder to hit by N. Korean missiles than those on land in S. Korea. Buying F-35B for land basing might provide a similar ability for less money, though.
 

Todjaeger

Potstirrer
I think it's largely a national pride thing. If Japan can build aircraft carriers, so can we! The CONOPS seems rather vague. I can see a use, though: an airfield that's harder to hit by N. Korean missiles than those on land in S. Korea. Buying F-35B for land basing might provide a similar ability for less money, though.
Longer term though, such an acquisition (providing that relevant CONOPS are also developed) could be wise for S. Korea. Right now the forces are all based around conflict with N. Korea, but there absolutely potential for S. Korea to come into conflict with other nations that are in eastern Asia. Such a conflict could involve access to rawmats and nat resources, but also SLOC to and from the region. AFAIK S. Korea, much like the PRC and Japan, do not possess much in the way of petroleum and are dependent on imports, much of which has to cross the SCS. Should any nation decide to declare the SCS as theirs, a S. Korean naval TF including a carrier would provide a broader range of options than just land-based maritime patrol/strike aircraft.
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
Longer term though, such an acquisition (providing that relevant CONOPS are also developed) could be wise for S. Korea. Right now the forces are all based around conflict with N. Korea, but there absolutely potential for S. Korea to come into conflict with other nations that are in eastern Asia. Such a conflict could involve access to rawmats and nat resources, but also SLOC to and from the region. AFAIK S. Korea, much like the PRC and Japan, do not possess much in the way of petroleum and are dependent on imports, much of which has to cross the SCS. Should any nation decide to declare the SCS as theirs, a S. Korean naval TF including a carrier would provide a broader range of options than just land-based maritime patrol/strike aircraft.
All true but let’s face it, PRC is the problem for SCS access. While carriers might provide important defence options, SKorea and Japan getting on the same page would be just, if not more, important. Perhaps today’s sad even in Japan could be the start for smoothing out relations.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
It wasn't clear in this article what kind of weapon this actually is.

But it seems to be a "Guided weapon that precisely strikes multiple LCACs(Landing Craft, Air Cushion) of
enemy landing on the coast at high speed".
According to LIG Nex1, the creator of “Poniard” Korean-Low cOst Guided Imaging Rocket (K-LOGIR).
 

FormerDirtDart

Well-Known Member
It wasn't clear in this article what kind of weapon this actually is.

But it seems to be a "Guided weapon that precisely strikes multiple LCACs(Landing Craft, Air Cushion) of
enemy landing on the coast at high speed".
According to LIG Nex1, the creator of “Poniard” Korean-Low cOst Guided Imaging Rocket (K-LOGIR).
It's a guided 70 mm (2.75 in) folding fin aerial rocket with an imagining infrared seeker. Similar to the laser guided to DAGR, APKWS and GATR, just not requiring the target to be "painted"
 
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