Royal New Zealand Navy Discussions and Updates

alexsa

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Folks we need to be careful about spit balling ideas. The SPIMM is a module that would need to be secured on deck and does not have any sensors included as far as I can tell from the data sheet. So it will still need targeting information to be provided to the two operators in the module. It is not small and only provides storage for 6 missiles including those in the launcher. So we are back to space and weight.

I can possibly see the point if NZ had a stock pile of Mistrals (in date and usable). However, if the missile is effectively out of date then I suggest the likely solution should be something the RNZN currently stock.
 

JohnJT

Member
Folks we need to be careful about spit balling ideas. The SPIMM is a module that would need to be secured on deck and does not have any sensors included as far as I can tell from the data sheet.
You must have missed this:
The SPIMM module consists of a SIMBAD-RC automated naval turret equipped with two ready-to-fire Mistral missiles and a 360° infrared panoramic system to detect and track air and surface threats.

Here are the space and weight details:
This ISO standard “allin-one” module, 10 feet long and weighing some 7 tons, can be easily positioned on the deck of a ship using a crane, and requires just a standard electrical connection.
 
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alexsa

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Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
You must have missed this:


Here are the space and weight details:
No I did not but I was not clear either ... sorry my bad. A couple of things:
1. IR sensors as a sole detection method offers much less in detection capability than the Mk 15 CIWS you are looking to replace. The combination of scan and track radar, internal fire control arrangements (it does not require two operators in the cab) and optics are better that an IR sensor alone. If the vessel has a capable air search radar you would want to be using that as well given this will generally be located high in the ship and above the module and IR sensor.
2. Seven tonnes is not a massive weight and most cargo vessel could accommodate this pretty easily .... in locations where the deck loading can take it. Accommodation decks are generally not designed for high point loads (this thing has container fittings for securing so the load is distributed on four points each about 10 inches by 10 inches). So real estate is going to be your problem as I suspect this will end up in one of your container spaces on deck (which means) it may be close to the main deck rather than on the higher decks. If you want to put it higher you are going to have to modify the structure (even if that is only the fit securing sockets).
3. I cannot see such a system being fitted to the RNZN FFH's given they have seaceptor and the Mk15. As a result you will be buying different system for your auxillaries and using a different missile or gun system. The bean counters hate multiple systems with associated support costs.

The ethos behind this offering really is a last ditch system that I can see being used for ships taken up from trade (STUFT) for a particular operation.
 

At lakes

Active Member
I didn't know whether to put this one on the RNZN thread or the RAN thread. Defence Connect showing there very high standard of research again, the butt of one of the Air Warfare Destroyers and another vessel that certainly does not belong to the ADF

You would have thought they could have managed a better photo of an RAN vessel.





ADF arrives in Hawaii ahead of RIMPAC
 

ngatimozart

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How to wind sailors up? Do a sail past the local flesh pots and pubs knowing that none of those onboard can go ashore to sample the delights of said flesh pots and pubs. It's a cruel and unusual punishment.
 

Nighthawk.NZ

Active Member

HMA Ships Hobart and Stuart conducted Officer of the Watch Manoeuvres with HMNZS Manawanui from the Royal New Zealand Navy off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii before sailing to take part in RIMPAC 2020.

Credit: Australian Department of Defence/LSIS Christopher Szumlanski.

 

ngatimozart

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Staff member
Verified Defense Pro

HMA Ships Hobart and Stuart conducted Officer of the Watch Manoeuvres with HMNZS Manawanui from the Royal New Zealand Navy off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii before sailing to take part in RIMPAC 2020.

Credit: Australian Department of Defence/LSIS Christopher Szumlanski.

Must be getting near scran time.
 

Redlands18

Well-Known Member
I didn't know whether to put this one on the RNZN thread or the RAN thread. Defence Connect showing there very high standard of research again, the butt of one of the Air Warfare Destroyers and another vessel that certainly does not belong to the ADF

You would have thought they could have managed a better photo of an RAN vessel.





ADF arrives in Hawaii ahead of RIMPAC
Still better looking then the Kiwi Ship, gawd that thing is uglyo_O
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Ok I’ll be the silly b****er to ask,
what the Bl**dy Hell is Scran
Scran is food, tucker and as a general rule if it's officer of the watch manoeuvres then its scran time because its a sure bet that the officer of the watch will be ordered to put 30 degrees of wheel on followed by the opposite wheel. So your scran goes skating across your mess table.
 
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