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Royal New Zealand Navy Discussions and Updates

Discussion in 'Navy & Maritime' started by Padman, May 16, 2006.

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  1. Novascotiaboy

    Novascotiaboy Active Member

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    As a typical Northerner I have never viewed the world map from that perspective with NZ top centre. Interesting to say the least.

    Looking at the inshore patrol needs would the CB90 be a viable option for naval reserve units around the country? Fast, all weather with an ability to mount weapons if required they could be used for a multitude of tasks and provide reserve personnel Sea time. Given their size they could be license built in country.
     
  2. Xthenaki

    Xthenaki Member

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    If the Navy were to throw the IPV plans to a Naval Architect to see if they could raise the fo'c'sle and create a larger bow flare an opportunity could be made to see if that option was feasible both with cost and improved sea handling ability. If trialed a one off would be a start.
     
  3. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    IPC's were / are 27 m Rob. I say are because they are still being used in civilian capacities; some as gin palaces.
    Cpl PM Muldoon's quip regarding Kiwis migrating to Australia comes to mind as well: "The IQ of both countries will go up then won't it." :D
    Yes she does look very impressive and I think that they have done a good job with her. They had an independent assessor go over her as well.
     
  4. ASSAIL

    ASSAIL Defense Professional Verified Defense Pro

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    Don’t forget a 10 mtr x 5 mtr rudder!
     
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  5. Xthenaki

    Xthenaki Member

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    The present draught is 2.9m. Able to Petrol in Sea state 5 (4metres) Survival is (up to seastate 8).
    If seastate 6 or just over to 5.5/6metre wave max were possible, operating parameters would change - looking at East coast NZ (Inc, Chatham Is.)/West coast N Is to Pacific Islands
     
  6. Gibbo

    Gibbo Active Member

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    Yes Manawanui will prove a good buy, I have no doubt. One thing I do wonder though - is the recompression chamber big enough? It'll treat 2 divers... the bell can take 3 so arguably you could be in a situation at least 3 need attention.
     
  7. MrConservative

    MrConservative Super Moderator Staff Member

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    IIRC it is as dive pairs or buddies as SOP. The additional space in the bell is likely there for equipment / emergency.
     
  8. Exkiwiforces

    Exkiwiforces New Member

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    There was a doco about a Deep Sea Dive that went wrong in the Nth Sea on Netflix and the during the dive it 3 in the dive bell with divers and a dive supervisor (not sure if that’s correct terminology) who double check the equipment, unbundle the umbilical cords and maintain coms to the Dive Shift Supervisor Top side. I would be a little concerned if the decompression chamber or whatever it’s called only fits two as I believe standard industry practice is: two divers, one dive supervisor and a medic per decompression chamber.
     
  9. MrConservative

    MrConservative Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Surgeon Commodore Tony Slark RNZN pretty much wrote the text book when it came to Hyperbaric medicine. I am pretty sure that HMNZS Matataua wont be taking short cuts here.
     
  10. Gibbo

    Gibbo Active Member

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    Sorry it does mention 2 divers & a medic on the video... I just wondered if 2 divers was enough. Clearly I'm a numby when it comes to recompression chambers... I wonder if those are beds or fold down seats in the inner chamber!?! Do divers normally sit or lie down during treatment? There's 2 fold-down seats in the outer chamber - where does the medic sit? I notice the inward opening door of the inner chamber will not open if the fold-down seat behind it is not lifted, wonder if that's likely to be an issue if occupants pass out & need to be accessed!?!
     
  11. RegR

    RegR Active Member

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    TBH the IPVs and OPVs are merely transports for boardings as it is the 2 x RHIBs that do the actual boarding, hence their ease of launch/recovery and almost identical drills and set up. The ships just extend transits into any given area (be it inshore or off) and provide a homebase to work from, live off for a week whilst transiting along the coastline and provide intercept, over watch and recovery options. As for size I have seen an IPV so close to shore you could clearly see the guys on the deck so obviously like any ship they know how far in (or out) they can go within their limits, point being they are obviously not adverse to bringing them "inshore" when/if needed for whatever reasons.
     
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  12. RegR

    RegR Active Member

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    Agreed, it looks to be a great step up in comfort features, functionality and sea keeping compared to old and that did a great job so it can only get better. I think this may now be a sought after posting in comparison. By all accounts the ship was assessed to be in fine condition and even deemed on par with a much younger ship in terms of overall condition.

    I actually quite like this ship and she is quite a larger beast going off the pics of her parked next to one of the OPVs. Long may she serve.
     
  13. Rob c

    Rob c Active Member

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    I should have made it clear that I was referring to the prior Lake class IPC which were 32.9m length and 6.1 beam with 25 knots speed, ( in very calm water ) in service from about 1974 to 1991. While the moa class came into service at the end of my service I was far more aware of the lake class and their crews and did a small amount of time at sea on them.
     
  14. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Ah, the Lake class well known as bone breakers. I was based at Shelly Bay when they used to come alongside and scored more than one tot :D
     
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  15. 40 deg south

    40 deg south Well-Known Member

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    Apologies if this has already been noted, but there was plenty of speculation when the Edda Fonn was first purchased as to whether the flight deck could take a NH90.
    In the final minute of the video, the Captain clearly states that it can.
     
  16. Rob c

    Rob c Active Member

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    The PO's made that compulsory when they came along side when I was there at the senior nco's mess, even their officers used to drink in the senior nco's as they did not think much of our offices ( mainly admino's )Great nights, hard mornings.
     
  17. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Yep. Dead right nights & mornings. Crawl from the Cpls club to home, get told off for being late - did say I'd be home at 1/2 past and if home at 25 past was early and 25 to was late :D. 4 cups of coffee before look at work starts & match sticks to keep eyes open. Lived over in Kilbirnie at the time, so could make for interesting drive home around the Bay road.
     
  18. Catalina

    Catalina Member

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    17th August 1959 has been described as the last time the RNZAF dropped a live bomb in conflict, during the Malayan Emergency.

    Out of curiosity, when was the last time the RNZN fired at a target during a conflict?
     
  19. MrConservative

    MrConservative Super Moderator Staff Member

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    14 Squadron Canberra's were deployed to Borneo between 1964-1966 with the role of providing strategic protection and overwatch on 1RNZIR. However they did not have to directly engage - which is an example of the great role that deterence plays with respect to armed confrontation.
     
  20. Catalina

    Catalina Member

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    Good morning Mr Conservative,

    Thank you for the information about 14 Squadron. You are right regarding the importance of deterence, and the benefits that an overwatch capibility provides troops on the ground.

    Wonder also if anyone can confirm the last time our Navy fired at a target during a conflict.

    Thanks for any information.

    Yours Faithfully
    Catalina