Canada Defence Force

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Another opportunity for our defence procurement experts to shine....just kidding.:mad:

So how did you buy the Brownings in the first place? You must have taken a long time to get past powder and shot muskets and pistols or was that done by the British before they left? Are you sure that Sir Humphrey Appleby is not running the place?
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
Likely our first pistols were WW1 surplus LE 303s with the barrels shortened.;) The Brownings were ordered over 70 years ago when the country still took defence seriously. Sir Humphrey would probably be an improvement.
 

OldTex

Member
Another opportunity for our defence procurement experts to shine....just kidding.:mad:

Canada is not alone in keeping older weapons for use by non-SF units. I qualified on the 9mm Browning Hi-power (Mk3) before deploying the ME in 2016. The RAAF ADGs were using MSPs (go figure).
 

Terran

Active Member
Another opportunity for our defence procurement experts to shine....just kidding.:mad:

Assuming no malarkey this line I think would be a major factor.
The DND was told at the time by industry representatives that it didn’t make economic sense to have Colt manufacture the guns in Canada or to have parts shipped to Colt so the guns could be assembled in Canada.
Since Colt hasn’t had a new pistol since All American 2000 that wasn’t either a 1911 or a captive import. You will probably see Something from the US Small arms market. Top pics being Glock or Sig. those two just came off the US M17 program. Glock 17 is generally the modern standard.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Likely our first pistols were WW1 surplus LE 303s with the barrels shortened.;) The Brownings were ordered over 70 years ago when the country still took defence seriously. Sir Humphrey would probably be an improvement.
Back in 1991 when I qualified on pistols with the RNZN it was the Browning 9 mm which was standard NZDF issue at the time. You could hear the round rattling it's around the barrel on its way out. We reckoned that we would be better throwing the weapon at the enemy / crim but the gunner was emotionally attached to his weapon count. Later on they replaced them with the Sig Sauer from memory. We used them for boardings etc., so I suppose could always club someone into submission with them.
 

Rob c

Active Member
Back in 1991 when I qualified on pistols with the RNZN it was the Browning 9 mm which was standard NZDF issue at the time. You could hear the round rattling it's around the barrel on its way out. We reckoned that we would be better throwing the weapon at the enemy / crim but the gunner was emotionally attached to his weapon count. Later on they replaced them with the Sig Sauer from memory. We used them for boardings etc., so I suppose could always club someone into submission with them.
Hell you were well off, when I did pistol training in the mid 60's we had S&W 38's, the first problem you had was to actually hit something with the damn thing ( the local saying at the time was that the only way you could hit a barn with one was to step inside and close the door before you fired)> Even if you were lucky enough to hit what you were aiming at the chances of doing any damage was very slim.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Hell you were well off, when I did pistol training in the mid 60's we had S&W 38's, the first problem you had was to actually hit something with the damn thing ( the local saying at the time was that the only way you could hit a barn with one was to step inside and close the door before you fired)> Even if you were lucky enough to hit what you were aiming at the chances of doing any damage was very slim.
At least the round found the end of the S/W barrel. Wasn't guaranteed with the 9mm Brownings. Round would run out of energy before it reached the end by the time it rattled its way around on the inside.
 
Top