Jump training for pilots?

STURM

Well-Known Member
During the period when basic fixed trainers didn’t have ejections seats; was it common for air arms to require trainee pilots to have jump training?
 

ngatimozart

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Verified Defense Pro
During the period when basic fixed trainers didn’t have ejections seats; was it common for air arms to require trainee pilots to have jump training?
From what I remember I don't think so. When I was based at RNZAF Wigram they didn't appear to do formal jump training. Certainly can't remember any talk of the flyboy trainees going to PTSU at Whenuapai to learn they completely unnatural act of jumping out of a completely serviceable aircraft.
 

STURM

Well-Known Member
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Appreciate the feedback. The reason I asked is because during a discussion with an ex pilot a few months; he mentioned that as part of his basic training (during the late 1980’s) trainee pilots were required to undergo at least one static jump before proceeding to actual flight training on the PC-7 Mk1.

The idea being that if they experienced an irrecoverable emergency; they’d hesitate less jumping off the plane (the PC-7 M1 has no ejection seat); if they’d performed a prior actual jump.

I have no idea if jump training is still required for trainee pilots given that the PC-7 Mk2 has a ejection seat and that jump training for trainee pilots is resource intensive and exposes them to possible injuries. Plus the fact that by and large; most air arms do not require pilots to have jump training.
 

Rob c

Well-Known Member
From what I remember I don't think so. When I was based at RNZAF Wigram they didn't appear to do formal jump training. Certainly can't remember any talk of the flyboy trainees going to PTSU at Whenuapai to learn they completely unnatural act of jumping out of a completely serviceable aircraft.
When I did my first flight in a Harvard I was given rudimentary instruction on how to exit the aircraft without hitting the tail plane and verbal instruction on when to pull the ripcord, plus a quick indication of how to land, feet together and knees bent. Later in my career for a time I had to do regular flights in ejection seat aircraft I did a aviation med Coase at Base Auckland, including time in the altitude chamber and had training in the correct posture when ejecting . What training the pilots had I don't know. The only other comment was a pilot saying during a preflight briefing that if he said EJECT and I said WHAT I would be talking to myself. That aircraft did not have command ejection.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
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When I did my first flight in a Harvard I was given rudimentary instruction on how to exit the aircraft without hitting the tail plane and verbal instruction on when to pull the ripcord, plus a quick indication of how to land, feet together and knees bent. Later in my career for a time I had to do regular flights in ejection seat aircraft I did a aviation med Coase at Base Auckland, including time in the altitude chamber and had training in the correct posture when ejecting . What training the pilots had I don't know. The only other comment was a pilot saying during a preflight briefing that if he said EJECT and I said WHAT I would be talking to myself. That aircraft did not have command ejection.
When I did my Harvard jollies the briefing was much the same with the added admonition to avoid fence posts. I never had the pleasure of doing an flights in aircraft fitted with bang seats. Definitely couldn't go in an A-4 because my legs are to long and I have left the lower halves behind banging out because they wouldn't cleared the instrument panel.
 

Rob c

Well-Known Member
When I did my Harvard jollies the briefing was much the same with the added admonition to avoid fence posts. I never had the pleasure of doing an flights in aircraft fitted with bang seats. Definitely couldn't go in an A-4 because my legs are to long and I have left the lower halves behind banging out because they wouldn't cleared the instrument panel.
T bird was fine for long legged buggers as mine were also long ( longer than my youngest son who is 6ft 3in ) and I was ok for a T bird but miles too long for a solo bird.
 
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