Civil Maritime News & Discussion

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
What rich folk spend their money on will sometime stun you. Example .... Old M Class frigate into a super yacht. There is no way this could be justified on a cost basis .... but they did it.

How the navy frigate Yas was transformed into a dolphin-inspired superyacht (boatinternational.com)
Swift 141 meter frigate converted into a superyacht? - General Yachting Discussion | YachtForums: We Know Big Boats!
Thank you for sharing.
(But the Hr.Ms. Piet Hein F811 is actually a 130,5 meter long Kortenaer /S-klasse frigate.)
 

Redlands18

Well-Known Member
Thanks for that, I will admit I guessed the class.
All the M Class are actually still in service, 2 each in the Dutch, Chilean, Belgian and Portuguese Navies. First of class(originally the Karl Doorman) only just hitting the 30 year mark, so a few more NMs in them yet.
 

KiwiRob

Well-Known Member
What rich folk spend their money on will sometime stun you. Example .... Old M Class frigate into a super yacht. There is no way this could be justified on a cost basis .... but they did it.

How the navy frigate Yas was transformed into a dolphin-inspired superyacht (boatinternational.com)
Swift 141 meter frigate converted into a superyacht? - General Yachting Discussion | YachtForums: We Know Big Boats!
They bought 2 frigates for conversion, the second vessel is taking a bit longer, the project name is Swift 135.
 

swerve

Super Moderator
What rich folk spend their money on will sometime stun you. Example .... Old M Class frigate into a super yacht. There is no way this could be justified on a cost basis .... but they did it.

How the navy frigate Yas was transformed into a dolphin-inspired superyacht (boatinternational.com)
Swift 141 meter frigate converted into a superyacht? - General Yachting Discussion | YachtForums: We Know Big Boats!
Looking at the scale of the rebuilding I think it very likely that it would have been cheaper to build from scratch.

From one of the comments -

IMHO this yacht had the wrong base to be converted from, the wrong yard for that conversion and some, lets say, less than optimum subcontractors and project management. Filler, paint and fairing allone will not turn a duck into a swan
Apparently the M class have the reputation of rolling on wet grass.
 

alexsa

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
Looking at the scale of the rebuilding I think it very likely that it would have been cheaper to build from scratch.

From one of the comments -


Apparently the M class have the reputation of rolling on wet grass.
I could not image this was cost effective at all. The scope of the changes were such that it must have cost at lese as much as a new build (I suspect more) added to which a lot of the hull is 'well worn'. If they kept the machinery to save costs that would pretty used as well.
 

KiwiRob

Well-Known Member
Looking at the scale of the rebuilding I think it very likely that it would have been cheaper to build from scratch.

From one of the comments -


Apparently the M class have the reputation of rolling on wet grass.
They would have installed stabilisers when she was rebuilt.
 

swerve

Super Moderator
I could not image this was cost effective at all. The scope of the changes were such that it must have cost at lese as much as a new build (I suspect more) added to which a lot of the hull is 'well worn'. If they kept the machinery to save costs that would pretty used as well.
In one of the links it was said that the machinery had been replaced. Doesn't sound like there's much left of the original except the hull, & even that appears to have been heavily modified.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
A film record of a rounding of Cape Horn in 1928 aboard the German four masted barque Peking. An outward bound from Hamburg to Valparaiso, Chile as she plied the nitrate trade. The sailor who shot the film provided a narration in later years.

 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
A film record of a rounding of Cape Horn in 1928 aboard the German four masted barque Peking. An outward bound from Hamburg to Valparaiso, Chile as she plied the nitrate trade. The sailor who shot the film provided a narration in later years.

Awesome film. Great ship for green transportation but really can't see finding sailors like those in the film, especially the captain.
 

ASSAIL

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
Awesome film. Great ship for green transportation but really can't see finding sailors like those in the film, especially the captain.
If you can find a copy “The Last Grain Race” by Eric Newby is a fascinating read with many wonderful photos included.
You say we can’t find “sailors like those” anymore but I’m not so sure.
Newby is an 18yr old city slicker who was bored so he signed on to “Moshulu” as an Apprentice for a year long voyage from Belfast to the South Australian Gulfs, Spencer and St Vincent’s, to load 5,000 tons of bagged wheat and return to the UK where they arrive as WW2 is beginning.
The oldest member of the 28 man crew was 58, the sailmaker. The Skipper was 35 and the average age of the crew was 19!
These young men were constantly changing sails weighing up to 1.5tons each and doing it 130ft above the deck in rough weather whilst sailing around both Capes during the voyage.
The only mechanical appliance on the ship was the “donkey” a basic winch which lifted out ballast (4,000 tons of it (now you know where that chart annotation “Ballast Ground” comes from) and loaded wheat whereafter it was disassembled.
If you want to know what life was like on these ships it’s well worth your time.

 
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ASSAIL

The Bunker Group
Verified Defense Pro
@ASSAIL I found a 5 min clip on YouTube. Don't think it's the same one though.

The ports in St Vincent’s and Spencer gulfs were too shallow to load alongside, the large ships would anchor out and the wheat was loaded into gulf ketches which carried the grain out AdelaideAZ you can see one being loaded in your video which was a nice find.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
The ports in St Vincent’s and Spencer gulfs were too shallow to load alongside, the large ships would anchor out and the wheat was loaded into gulf ketches which carried the grain out AdelaideAZ you can see one being loaded in your video which was a nice find.
Thanks. They were real sailors in those days.

I was watching the seas wash across the deck of the Peking in the storm and as she was in the Southern Ocean. If you got caught in that you were fish tucker. I for one wouldn't be wanting to climb the rigging, even tied up alongside on a dead calm day - I don't like heights. But watching those sailors working on the yards with apparent ease, it was awe inspiring.

I didn't like the way the Capt treated his dog, but then using the dog to hurry the ODs up I laughed my head off at. Dog would've made a good GI. Wouldn't wanted to be the OD who was mess cook when the roughers were real bad. He wouldn't be very popular if he lost the scran between the galley and the mess. Betcha they had a good run ashore when they arrived in Chile.
 
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