US Chief Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr. visits Singapore

OPSSG

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US Chief Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr. visits the SAF in Singapore and there are a few pictures of his visit here.

U.S. Army photos by D. Myles Cullen below.



Aug. 26, 2009 - U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, inspects the Guard-of-Honor at Singapore's Ministry of Defense. Gen. Casey previously served as Commanding General, Multi-National Force - Iraq prior to handing over command to the then Lt Gen. Petraeus. Behind Gen. Casey Jr. is Singapore's Chief of Army, Major General Neo Kian Hong. MG Neo is a Guards Officer by training (which explains his Khaki Beret), he is also Ranger qualified and served in INTERFET. MG Neo was the top student of the Singapore Command and Staff Course in 1993 and he also attended the Indonesian Army Staff and Command College (SESKOAD) in 1994.

Note: Singapore's Ranger qualified soldiers are often also Thai airborne qualified (see post No. 4 below for pix), MG Neo's Thai airborne wings is on his right chest).



Aug. 26, 2009 - Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean, left, awards Singapore's prestigious military award, the Pingat Jasa Gemilang (Tentera), or the Meritorious Service Medal (Military) to General George William Casey Jr. at an investiture held at the Ministry of Defence (Mindef).



Aug. 26, 2009 - U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, meets with SAF soldiers from the Commando Formation (note the Red Berets) who have recently returned from Afghanistan. In the left (background) is the SAF's LTC Alfred Fox of the Armour Formation (note the Black Beret), who was stationed at ISAF Headquarters in Karbul from March 2009. He's also just returned to Singapore.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26XqOfSaf7Q]Postcards From Afghanistan[/ame]

Above is a Mindef video on our medical team in Afghanistan.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjO0I976KHI]Singapore and NZ Troops Partners For Peace[/ame]

Above is another video by Staff Sgt. Michael McCool on our Combat Engineers in Afghanistan, serving as part of NZ's PRT. This video includes a short interview with the SAF's LTC James Tan.
 
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OPSSG

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26 August 2009 - Gen. Casey Jr. visited the Mindef, during which he called on Chief of Defence Force, LG Desmond Kuek; Chief of Army, MG Neo Kian Hong and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean. As shown in the pictures above, General Casey was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal (Military) in an investiture.

Later, General Casey visited the new Murai Urban Training Facility to view a demonstration of our advanced systems and platforms in the 3rd Generation SAF. They included the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS) and Integrated Body Armour.

Here's more pixs by D. Myles Cullen below.



Aug. 26, 2009 - U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, rides in a Singaporean armored transport vehicle during a demonstration of its capabilities.



Aug. 26, 2009 - Singapore Army Lt. Col. Jimmy Toh briefs U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, about Singapore's Murai Urban Warfare Training Facility (MUWTF), which is located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area. MUWTF s built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios. The MUTF is equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.



A Singapore soldier stands by while U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, is briefed about Singapore's army's equipment like the new body armour and the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS) which is used to enhance the situational awareness in urban warfare (click here for another DT discussion on this topic).

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aqs2SBacwhA]Network-enabled Urban Warriors[/ame]

Above is a Mindef video of the Murai Urban Warfare Training Facility and how the ACMS works.
 
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OPSSG

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Here's a pix of Gen. George W. Casey Jr., with the Trailblazer.



Aug. 26, 2009 - U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, is shown Singapore Army's NEW 30 ton class Counter-Mine Vehicle (CMV) called the Trailblazer (built on the Bionix IFV chassis), which uses a mine flail system. For more CMV details, see this DT thread. Pix by D. Myles Cullen.



Trailblazer pix in a DSTA publication called 'Introduction to Mine Clearing Technology'. [h/t to gary1910 for scanning page 123 of the DSTA publication]



Trailblazer on static display at another event and picture credit to kilroy.



Trailblazer on static display at another event and picture credit to kilroy. Developing the Trailblazer was quite a challenging task, revealed COL Ng Kin Yi, Chief Engineering Officer. He said:

“On one hand, we needed a CMV that would be able to move fast with the other vehicles through a wide range of terrain. Hence, it had to be compact and compatible with the Bionix platforms. At the same time, we wanted a CMV with a flailing system. A lot of people told us that it wasn’t possible, since flailing requires a lot of power, which would sacrifice vehicular speed. Therefore, a separate engine is needed to power the flailing mechanism so that speed is preserved.” *​



Trailblazer on static display at another event and picture credit to kilroy. In addition to mine-clearing, the Trailblazer is able to mark its trails using a lane marking system with pneumatically fired rods, which are the devices, enlarged in the above photo, with sharp stakes that you see on both sides of the Trailblazer.

--------------------------
*Footnote: Pg 5 of SAF's Army News issue No. 165, April/May 2009.
 
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OPSSG

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Prior exchanges before Gen Casey Jr.'s visit.



I was thinking, in August 2009, Singapore gave the Meritorious Service Medal (Military) to Gen Casey Jr. and earlier in Sept 2008, the US gave our Chief of Army, MG Neo a medal too. (U.S. Army photo by Monica Ann King/Released). Besides the desire of our armies to give our generals even more medals, these awards must reflect extensive military to military ties.

I checked around a found that in July 2009, the Oregon Guard were also in Singapore for Operation Tiger Balm '09. Here's a link to their website and the photos below are by Sgt. Eric Rutherford (more pixs are available here).

NB: Security badges have been altered for security purposes.



Maj. Gen. Patrick Wilson, deputy commanding general, Army National Guard, United States Army Pacific, inspects a platoon of Singapore infantry soldiers in Singapore, July 16. Wilson was visiting members of Operation Tiger Balm 09, a coalition training exercise between the Singapore army, and citizen soldiers and citizen airmen from Oregan, Hawaii, Utah and Arizona.



Staff Sgt. James Mayes, administrative non-commissioned officer and Spc. Kari Foster, operations specialist for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 82nd Brigade, and, Oregon Army National Guard, try out Singaporean Army surveillance equipment in Singapore, July 11. Mayes, of Portland, and Foster of Gresham, are members of Operation Tiger Balm 09, a coalition training exercise between the Singapore Army, and citizen-soldiers and citizen airmen from Oregon, Hawaii, Utah and Arizona.



Spc. Rob Malcolm, intelligence analyst for 82nd Rear Operations Center, Oregon Army National Guard, takes aim with the Singaporean army SAR-21 battle rifle in Singapore, July 11. Malcolm, of West Linn, Ore., is a member of Operation Tiger Balm 09, a coalition training exercise between the Singapore army, and citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen from Oregon, Hawaii, Utah and Arizona.



Sgt. Joseph Stuart, commander's driver for 82nd Rear Operations Center, and Spc. Kari Foster, operations specialist for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 82nd Brigade, Oregon Army National Guard, disassemble the Singapore army SAR-21 in Singapore, July 11. Stuart, of Portland, Ore., and Foster, of Gresham, Ore., are members of Operation Tiger Balm 09, a coalition training exercise between the Singapore army, and citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen from Oregon, Hawaii, Utah and Arizona.



Spc. Rob Malcolm, intelligence analyst for 82nd Rear Operations Center, Oregon Army National Guard, fires the Singapore army SAR-21 battle rifle on a firing range in Singapore, July 11. Malcolm, of West Linn, Ore., is a member of Operation Tiger Balm 09, a coalition training exercise between the Singapore army, and citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen from Oregon, Hawaii, Utah and Arizona.
 
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OPSSG

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Aug. 26, 2009 - U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, meets with SAF soldiers from the Commando Formation (note the Red Berets) who have recently returned from Afghanistan. In the left (background) is the SAF's LTC Alfred Fox of the Armour Formation (note the Black Beret), who was stationed at ISAF Headquarters in Karbul from March 2009. He's also just returned to Singapore.
It is very rare to have pictures of our commandos, especially of their faces. So it's kind of hard to put a human face of this formation. Here are some rare pictures of our commandos at an official event, the Presidential Garden Reception below:



In between President Nathan and the Major, who are shaking hands, is COL Lam Shiu Tong, the Commander, Special Operations Task Force (SOFT) and Chief Commando Officer. SOFT comprises of the Singapore SOF, the Commandos and the Naval Diving Unit.

Just for fun, can anyone identify all the foreign badges on the right chests of these soldiers standing around the President? To get the ball rolling, the Singapore skills badges featured on the left chest of the Ranger qualified Major include: (i) senior parachutist; (ii) military freefall; and (iii) professional diving.

 
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Aug. 26, 2009 - U.S. Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., Army chief of staff, rides in a Singaporean armored transport vehicle during a demonstration of its capabilities.
According to Singapore forum members, Gen. Casey Jr. was sitting inside the [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrex"]Terrex - Wikipedia, the free [email protected]@[email protected]@/wiki/File:NDP2010_Terrex_ICV_2.jpg" class="image"><img alt="NDP2010 Terrex ICV 2.jpg" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/NDP2010_Terrex_ICV_2.jpg/300px-NDP2010_Terrex_ICV_2.jpg"@@[email protected]@commons/thumb/7/75/NDP2010_Terrex_ICV_2.jpg/300px-NDP2010_Terrex_ICV_2.jpg[/ame] and this probably explains why in 2007 Singapore soldiers from 4th Battalion, Singapore Infantry Regiment (4 SIR) were training together at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Basically, it seems we were learning from the Americans how they use the Stryker and their concept of operations. Therefore it seems logical that Singapore is preparing to move towards the concept of mechanized infantry. However, it seems that the model shown to Gen. Casey Jr. has improved situational awareness compared to earlier models previously displayed.



An US Army Soldier from 2nd Platoon, C Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division,and Singapore soldiers from 4 SIR, enter a Stryker at the end of a cordon and search exercise at the Pvt. Joseph T. Martinez Combined Arms Combat Training Facility Aug. 16, 2007 at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Tiffany L Evans)

[h/t to the Singapore forum members for the new Terrex info]
 
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OPSSG

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Gen. Casey Jr's visit to Singapore is generating some little gems of information just from the photos released. I note that Singapore's Mindef has not announced that the Terrex has entered service. Earlier xtemujin had taken some photos of the Terrex at the Singapore Airshow 2008 below:



Another interior shot of the Terrex. Photo credit to xtemujin.



An exterior shot of the Terrex. Photo credit to xtemujin.

For more pixs from xtemujin of the Singapore Airshow 2008, see here.
 
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OPSSG

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Straits Times said:
Sep 2, 2009 - The Terrex... can roar across rugged terrain at a top speed of 105 kmh. Also at home in water, it weighs 26 tonnes and can carry 13 soldiers. The Singapore Armed Forces will buy 45 of these for its three combined arms divisions, and troops will start training on them in February. The vehicle is the result of a two-year partnership between the army, defence company Singapore Technologies Kinetics and the Defence Science & Technology Agency.

The Terrex takes foot soldiers away from being moved in lumbering, canvas-topped three-tonners, which are less mobile and still require troops to hotfoot it, sometimes for hours, to get to their destinations... But it is more than just a 'taxi'. Its electronic brain shows troops what is up ahead: On secure touch-screens, soldiers are given updates on troop positions - friendly ones marked in blue and hostile ones in red - in near real-time.
h/t to CJ for video and text below:

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEpEkcHCJ8k]Singapore Army's Terrex [/ame]

First view of a Singapore Army Terrex Infantry Carrier Vehicle demonstrating its Battlefield Management System (BMS), which improves the situational awareness of the embarked infantry especially during closed hatch operations. The 8-wheeled armoured vehicle and its BMS were developed in Singapore by the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF), Defence Science & Technology Agency (DSTA) and defence contractor, Singapore Technologies Kinetics.

Note the onboard cameras which pipe images of the outside world to the colour display in the troop compartment. The gunner (seated, left, up front) shares the same view as the screen in the troop compartment.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nf5VgJeibTY]Terrex simulated engagement[/ame]

In the above video, the vehicle is simulating an overwatch of an enemy-held built-up area. [Yes, they are speaking English]

The Terrex was unveiled in Singapore on 3 September 2009 at the Army Open House, organised by the Singapore Combat Engineers.

Notes: This video and text is also posted in the Made in Singapore Equipment thread.
 
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sunshin3

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Singapore's Mindef released pictures of Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean affixing the vehicle number plate on the newly launched Terrex Infantry Carrier Vehicle.



Teo Chee Hean mingling with children onboard the Terrex at the Army Open House 2009.



According to Strategy Page and the KL Security Review, Singapore is buying 135 Terrexs to equip 3 infantry battalions and there are 7 variants in the 135 vehicle order:

(i) troop carrier,
(ii) command post,
(iii) pioneer (or armoured engineer) vehicle,
(iv) armoured ambulance,
(v) ATGM,
(vi) STORM (strike observer mission), and
(vii) RSTA (recce, surveillance, target acquisition).

xtemujin, has a picture of the vehicle type overview on flickr here

According to a Straits Times report dated 3 Sept 2009 (page B6), the Terrex has a V shape for mine protection and 11 cameras mounted for situational awareness. The vehicle is 7.78 meters long, 2.97 meters wide, and 2.46 meters high. The vehicle carries 13 soldiers and 2 crewmen (driver and commander), in its armored personnel carrier (APC) role. More ballistic protection is available in the form of bolt on or welded armor.

This purchase will enable each of these 3G infantry battalions to get 45 of their own Terrexs. This looks to me as if Singapore is moving towards motorised infantry and seems to be following the US BCT concept closely. As previously mentioned in another thread, I like the fact that they have integrated a weapons location system that automatically turns the RWS to the approximate direction of the enemy firing.

There are more pictures of the 24-tonne Terrex Infantry Carrier Vehicle by the website KL Security Review (click to see article):

Picture of the front view of the Terrex below.



Remote weapon station armed with a 40mm automatic grenade launcher and a 7.62mm coaxial machine gun.



Here's another video from the recent Army Open House (AOH):

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejbuOLCJ_J4]Terrex at the AOH[/ame]
 
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Singapore enjoys a strong relationship with the US military.



Above is a pix of a RSAF block 52+ F-16D in Singapore [h/t to Red for the pix].





Above is a pix of the first four F-15SGs to arrive at Mountain Home in May 2009.

As a small country with limited air space for training, we are very grateful that the USAF enables us to conduct first rate training there and we try to be helpful to our US hosts when there is chance.



Above is a rare pix of a RSAF CH-47SD Chinook releasing sandbags to plug a hole in the broken levee after Hurricane Katrina. The RSAF Chinooks deployed were from a RSAF training detachment based in Grand Prairie, Texas, US. The CH-47SD has a longer "radar nose," found on the MH-47E Special Operations Chinook which can accommodate radar antennas and long-range fuel tanks with 2,068-gallon capacity.
 
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OPSSG

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@sunshin3, many thanks for the additional video, pictures and information on the Terrex. IMO, this is a major development for the Singapore infantry, as some battalions move from being foot soldiers to mechanized infantry. Gen. Casey Jr.'s visit just happened prior to the induction of the Terrex and he was given a preview.





See below for a Straits Times report dated 3 Sept 2009 that you referred to in your above post [h/t to indogtr19]:



[h/t to spiderweb6969]:



 
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Bonza

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Hahaha that's a great picture of an RSAF pirate there with the F-15SGs OPSSG... confused the hell out of me :p

Beautiful aircraft, didn't realise your air force made use of CFTs on your Falcons either
 

OPSSG

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Hahaha that's a great picture of an RSAF pirate there with the F-15SGs OPSSG... confused the hell out of me :p

Beautiful aircraft, didn't realise your air force made use of CFTs on your Falcons either
I appreciate your comments :D.



The video below explains the pirate.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLRHDayq-OI]F-15SG arrives at Mountain Home AFB[/ame]

The next video below was previously posted in the RSAF thread here but I see no harm cross posting it here. It shows our block 52+ F-16Ds with CFTs taking-off/landing on 2.5km of a 6 lane, public road during Ex Torrent 2008. Ex Torrent is an alternate runway exercise.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsBrZqFKeNM]RSAF Exercise Torrent 2008 - F-16D Blk 52+[/ame]

[h/t to pirate of alert 5.com for the video]
 
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OPSSG

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In other news, below is a picture of Warthog (eventually destined for British Forces in Afghanistan) fresh off the ST Kinetics assembly line in Singapore.



I note that twelve UK Armed Forces trainers are already in Singapore. The official ST Kinetics press release is here and a UK News report is here. As previously discussed, the Warthog is sightly heavier and better armoured than the baseline Bronco (featured below) but this should be no problem, as it is engineered to cater for weight growth as a result of up-armouring. Further, to ascertain the vehicle's performance in extreme heat and dust conditions, ST Kinetics also put a 19 tonne Warthog test-bed vehicle through desert trials in UAE. Below another pix from a Singapore Chinese Newspaper report dated 29 Sept 2009 (which describes the Warthog and Bronco) and of particular interest to me is the recovery variant of the Warthog pictured on the right [h/t to Five-Two for the scan].



Below is an outline drawing of the Bronco from the One35th modeling website.



The Bronco has an advanced patented coupling that links the front and rear units (allowing each unit to be transported by helicopter), which is easier to connect and disconnect. This feature allows the user to 'plug and play' so that different units can be attached as required by the mission. Singapore often uses the Bronco (hence the horse reference in the Bronco name) as a logistics support vehicle.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ja6s4sZ6t_g]Bronco All Terrain Tracked Carrier[/ame]

A Bronco All Terrain Tracked Carrier (ATTC) with a 120mm Super-Rapid Mortar in NZ during Ex Thunder Warrior.



Here's another pix of Bronco All Terrain Tracked Carrier (ATTC) with a 120mm Super-Rapid Mortar at the Army Open House.



There is another DT thread on 'Made in Singapore Equipment' with more discussions on the Terrex and the Warthog.
 
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OPSSG

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Below are pixs of block 52+ F-16Ds, with CFTs (and a dorsal spine packed with electronic warfare avionics). The 145 Squadron is a long range strike fighter squadron and all its 20 Vipers are tandem seaters. These 20 block 52+ Vipers of the 145 Squadron have since returned to Singapore.



In June 2003, four RSAF F-16C/Ds were were redeployed back to Singapore in an exercise to practise the RSAF’s recall of its overseas-based assets. This was the third time that the RSAF has conducted a long-range redeployment exercise. The aircraft departed from Luke Air Force Base in Arizona transited through Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii and Andersen Air Force Base in Guam before arriving in Singapore on 28 June. Below is a map of the route taken:



Two RSAF KC-135R tankers provided air-to-air refuelling support for the 17,000 km journey. During each leg of the journey, the F-16s were refuelled between six and eight times by the tankers.



For the 145 Squadron every mission is flown with a Pilot and Weapon System Officer (WSO) and this squadron has the most advanced F-16Ds in the our inventory.



The RSAF has been doing F-16 training under PEACE CARVIN for as long as I can remember. In Sept 2009, the Singapore air force renewed the F-16 PEACE CARVIN training program. This renewal of the pilot proficiency training program will cost Singapore another US$250m. The RSAF is also paying another US$75 million to lease F-16 aircraft from the USAF and for other related support and services at Springfield Air National Guard Base. This is on top of pilot training at Mountain Home for the 24x F-15SG purchase (pix of F-15SG in post #10 above). Below is a video by Nellis Spottiers of RSAF F-16s arriving for Red Flag 09-01. The F-16's are stationed at Luke AFB, Arizona which explains the LF tail code.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxuOY8XLhp4]Red Flag 09-01[/ame]

[h/t to spiderweb6969 for the Sept 2009, Air Forces Monthly]:



See the enclosed pix of a 425th FS block 52 F-16D (with a dorsal spine packed with electronic warfare avionics) armed with 4 GBU-12s (500 lbs), 2 AIM-120 AMRAAMS and 2 AIM-9 Sidewinders as well as the LANTIRN (a system with 2 pods). Currently, the 12 RSAF Vipers in the US are not equipped with CFTs.



BTW, it was announced that our F-16s are going to be upgraded with Sniper ATPs. I also know that Singapore F-16s have upgraded flight computers (made by Singapore Technologies - with the 'air platform enhancement team' winning an award in 2007) but I have no further details.

 
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OPSSG

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I've forgotten to mention an important milestone in the development of Singapore's combined arms operations, which would not have been possible without US support. That milestone was achieved in 2005, at the US Marines Air Ground Task Force Training Centre (MAGTFTC) in the Mojave Desert. Ex Forging Sabre is an integrated firing exercise held in the US.

# It is the first unilateral exercise conducted in the United States

# This also the first time that elements from all three of the Republic of Singapore Air Force’s US-based detachments will operate with Army elements and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) within a live-fire exercise setting.​


(click on the above illustration to see animation, click the play button every time it appears)




Ex Forging Sabre takes place in the dry and dusty Mojave Desert in southern California.



A control headquarters comprising integrated operations planners, sensors managers from both the RSAF and the Army has been formed specially for this exercise.



A RSAF's Chinook Helicopter from the Peace Praire detachment in Texas deploying troops for the exercise.



Here's a pix of the troops disembarking. BTW In the air or on land, multiple layers of precautionary checks are in place, creating a system of check-and-balance from the Headquarters to the individual.



Ground control: The harsh desert environment that the soldiers operate in. According to LTC Sung, dehydration and hypothermia are issues the troops have learnt to face.



The Searcher Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) provides real-time battlefield surveillance even in high risk areas without risking the loss of personnel.



Desert heat: Two Apache helicopters take to the skies, maneuvering across the hilly terrain of the Mojave Desert.



The AH-64D Apache attack helicopters take to the skies, maneuvering across the hilly terrain of the Mojave Desert.
 
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OPSSG

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...I checked around a found that in July 2009, the Oregon Guard were also in Singapore for Operation Tiger Balm '09. Here's a link to their website and the photos below are by Sgt. Eric Rutherford (more pixs are available here).



Spc. Rob Malcolm, intelligence analyst for 82nd Rear Operations Center, Oregon Army National Guard, fires the Singapore army SAR-21 battle rifle on a firing range in Singapore, July 11. Malcolm, of West Linn, Ore., is a member of Operation Tiger Balm 09, a coalition training exercise between the Singapore army, and citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen from Oregon, Hawaii, Utah and Arizona.
As I previously mentioned in this thread, with most Singapore weapons, they are designed with the smaller Asian body frame in mind. The SAR-21 rifle has a natural balance that places the center of gravity just over the shooter's hand so that the rifle can easily be pointed and even fired one-handed if desired (see above pix of Spc. Rob Malcolm using the SAR-21 at a range). I like the SAR-21, as it has a built in-optics, is factory zeroed (making zeroing of the weapon unnecessary) and has a translucent magazine casing (telling you how many rounds are remaining in the mag, as shown in the above pix).



Click here for the relevant ST Kinetics brochure and it was featured in a July 2008 Popular Mechanics article on the 'Top 5 High-Tech Guns for Next-Gen Infantry'.

Below are more SAR-21 pictures from Anthony G Williams and his excellent guns and ammo website:



Below is a SAR-21 fitted with the 40mm underbarrel grenade launcher.



Below is a SAR-21 with a modular mounting system.



Below is a SAR-21 lightweight carbine. [h/t to spiderweb6969 for scanning the article]



BTW, I finally found a pix (taken by a Singaporean in 2004) that unintentionally compares the length of a M16 (with a M203 attached) and that of the SAR-21 (click to see Jane's review of the weapon), which is shorter total length without a significant trade-off in barrel length due to its bullpup design. IMO, the length of M-16, makes it a bit cumbersome for dismounting off vehicles as compared to the M4 or SAR-21. [h/t to Joel and for more of his pixs go here]



More 2004 pixs below from Joel. These are pixs of Singaporeans in Brunei during jungle warfare training. These personal pixs of jungle warfare training are a misnomer, as they are always taken at rest.





More old pixs by tiusok below:



Field camp during basic training : learn to embrace the mud.



A chance to get close to nature and make friends with unsuspecting wild boars.



Battle inoculation course during basic training : heads down recruits, live rounds over your heads.



Damn... the mud is everywhere.



Route march for endurance training.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAUe83JPeW0]SAF Capabilities Video[/ame]

An old video from the Army Museum of Singapore.



An old newspaper 2006 article written by David Boey or his internet handle CJ. [h/t to spiderweb6969 for scanning the article]
 
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OPSSG

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Bonza said:
Hahaha that's a great picture of an RSAF pirate there with the F-15SGs OPSSG... confused the hell out of me :p

Beautiful aircraft, didn't realise your air force made use of CFTs on your Falcons either
I appreciate your comments :D.



The video below explains the pirate.

F-15SG arrives at Mountain Home AFB

The above pix of the F-15SG was misidentified as a F-15K. Picture credit to saguarowest photography.


The 366th Maintenance Group spouses hosted the Officer Spouses Club function “Presenting Singapore!” May 12. More than 75 OSC members and Republic of Singapore air force spouses attended the function. Presenting the program, “Singapore, the place to be and the place we call home,” was Valerie Wong, spouse of Lt. Col. Lim Chee Meng. Sheryl West, spouse of Lt. Col. Dane West, said the 366th MXG spouses felt the program promoted appreciation, understanding and further integration of the new RSAF spouses into the Mountain Home community. (Photo courtesy Chandra Depriest)
 
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OPSSG

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More pixs of the pirates :).


Republic of Singapore air force Staff Sgt. Ricky Morier, 428th Fighter Squadron flightline crew, unveils Lt. Col. Keith Gibson and Maj. Robin Tan’s names on the side of an F-15SG during the reactivation and assumption-of-command ceremony May 18. The combined U.S. Air Force and Republic of Singapore air force unit will train RSAF aircrews in F-15SG fighters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Debbie Lockhart)


Col. James McGovern, 366th Operations Group commander, passes the 428th Fighter Squadron guidon to Lt. Col. Keith Gibson, 428th FS commander, during the reactivation and assumption-of-command ceremony May 18. “The base is very excited to work with the RSAF because this partnership provides important combat readiness training for our Singapore partners, and fulfills the need to train as a team in a multi-national force structure,” said Lt. Col. Keith Gibson, the training squadron’s U.S. commander. The U.S. Air Force reactivated the 428th FS here as part of the Peace Carvin V program -- an international partnership between the United States and Republic of Singapore.


Lt. Col. Michael Quintini, 428th Fighter Squadron director of operations, commands a flight of U.S. Air Force and Republic of Singapore air force airmen during the squadron's reactivation and assumption-of-command ceremony May 18. The unit will include approximately 180 active duty and 130 support personnel as part of a long-standing partnership with the United States to train its aircrews. Over the life of the program, as many as 2,000 active duty RSAF personnel will live and work on the base.


The 428th Fighter Squadron flying in formation at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Squadron operates F-15SGs to conduct formal training missions to qualify Republic of Singapore Air Force crew in the F-15SG. All pictures below are by U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald.


The F-15SG in the foreground is identifiable by the RSAF's Merlion roundel just below cockpit.


A six-ship formation of F-15Cs, F-15Es and one F-15SG, fly over the nearby Sawtooth Mountains Oct. 13, 2009.
 
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Waylander

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Did you encountered any other wild animals during your military time?
Contrary to our middle european forests there are many animals in the jungles of SEA which I wouldn't want to encounter during training.
I expect that especially poisonous animals may be a problem. Do you carry any drugs with you which counter possible poisons?


On the other hand here in Germany a Boar is not your friend!
When I once encountered such a beast in the night I nearly shit my pants and had to climb a near.
I never climbed that fast... :shudder
 
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