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Should the Federal Goverment reintroduce the death penalty for terrorism?

Discussion in 'Intros & Off Topic' started by t68, Nov 25, 2018.

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  1. t68

    t68 Well-Known Member

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    I have been thinking for some time about the instances of terrorist acts committed in Australia and wonder if these acts should come under treason and most specifically The Security Legislation Amendment (Terrorism) Act 2002 (the Act),

    https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentar...ees?url=pjcis/securityleg/report/chapter4.pdf


    They replaced the death penalty under the Crimes Act of 1914, since the acts are parts of retribution for our involvement in the Middle East and elsewhere I belive the federal government should re-introduce the death penalty for such instance against the indiscriminate targeting of non-combants under treason as a majority of these terrorist have Australian citizenship.


    I’m sick and tired of the prices of $hits commuting these treasons acts then using the same laws they appear to reject to get them sentenced in Gaol at our expense for the time they are incarcerated.
     
  2. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Where do you draw the line with capital punishment? Treason? Terrorism? Murder? Rape? Kiddy fiddling? More to the point, what if you get it wrong and the accused is innocent? Bit hard to do a Lazarus if they is dead. Also lets be brutally honest, historically speaking Aussie cop forces don't exactly have squeaky clean corruption free records do they? So whilst there is will always be the risk, however low, of someone being fitted up, the public perception will be higher because of prior form.

    Executing a terrorist just creates another martyr for other idiots to emulate, so it achieves no purpose whatsoever. Of course you could make a statement by including such practices that would preclude said martyr from reaching "paradise" in the afterlife during said execution and burial, and live broadcasting such, but that would create moral repugnation within the domestic population which would be reflected in the ballot box, i.e., political suicide.

    There are more ways of killing an alley cat than stuffing its backside full of cream buns.
     
  3. t68

    t68 Well-Known Member

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    Would I like to see the death penalty for things you listed, sure I would if it’s proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

    But what I’m suggesting here is that of treason by Australian citizen/residents and those that come here via refugee program, and commits murder in the name of a foreign state or terrorist organisation.

    According to the Daily Telegraph, keeping serial killer Ivan Milat behind bars at Goulburn Supermax cost NSW taxpayers $824 a day in 2009, why should we taxpayer continue paying for these lowlifes that have no respect for our values and choose to murder non- combatants.
     
  4. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Doesn't matter. Under current CoA Law you have other options of dealing with them, like deportation after completion of sentence. You can revoke their citizenship or residency on character grounds if they weren't born in Australia or their birth wasn't registered within Australia. Just ask a lot of Kiwis deported on spurious character grounds. I am not really a fan of the death penalty because it is to final and if there is a miscarriage of justice, its far to late to do anything about it.

    I look at the US where some States are a tad enthusiastic about the death penalty and it hasn't solved anything, nor appears to act as a deterrent. The second thing that I notice there is that the execution methodology is what some would claim to be cruel with the sentence taking decades before it is carried due to the drawn out legal process with just about every man and his dog able to appeal against a seat sentence. My own view is that the UK and NZ systems were better. I presume that the Australian system was similar.
     
  5. malleboy

    malleboy New Member

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    My understanding is that in the US it is more expensive to execute than to jail someone for a lifetime. The number of legal hurdles, appeals etc make execution very expensive.

    It my be wrong but sometimes I feel like our jails are like luxury radicalization suites, we pamper them with luxurious prisons and allow them to be further radicalized. Really I think we have to have effective deradicalization program for Australian only citizens, it can be done but it needs to be done properly. Every other options I can think of runs into hurdles. We can expel dual national and revoke our citizenship, but we cannot leave someone stateless, so Australian citizen only offenders cannot be removed. (We could make deal to have a more ruthless state (that doesn't run luxury prisons) grant them citizenship and deport them there, but I'm sure that wold break some international treaty)
     
  6. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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    A piece of reusable rope to off terrorists seems preferable to spending $824 a day to keep them in storage for the rest of lives considering our budget pressures.
     
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  7. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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    The legal expenses likely are more expensive for certain states in the US. This is to be expected for a country that produces more lawyers per year than scientists and engineers. It seems word sue follows every mishap or transaction in the US.
     
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