Old satellites and space debris.

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
Old satellites, left overs from launches and other space debris can cause problems for new launches, space stations and active satellites.

One solution to decrease space debris is to extend the life of satellites.

One of those satellites is the Intelsat 10-02.
The ageing platform, Intelsat 10-02, which relays TV channels and other telecoms services, is getting very low on fuel after 17 years in orbit.
But that's no longer a problem because the satellite that docked with IS-10-02 on Monday has plenty of propellant. This satellite, the mission extension vehicle (MEV), has attached itself to the Intelsat, and will perform all the manoeuvres to extend the usage of IS-10-02 for around 5 years.

 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
Here we can find a detailed description of the Mission Extension Vehicle and other life extension services. They also explain what they are doing and about their future plans.

 

bearnard19

Member
Old satellites, left overs from launches and other space debris can cause problems for new launches, space stations and active satellites.

One solution to decrease space debris is to extend the life of satellites.

One of those satellites is the Intelsat 10-02.
The ageing platform, Intelsat 10-02, which relays TV channels and other telecoms services, is getting very low on fuel after 17 years in orbit.
But that's no longer a problem because the satellite that docked with IS-10-02 on Monday has plenty of propellant. This satellite, the mission extension vehicle (MEV), has attached itself to the Intelsat, and will perform all the manoeuvres to extend the usage of IS-10-02 for around 5 years.


Actually, space debris became an important issue in the modern world of space exploration area. The big number of space junk can damage expensive spacecrafts The growing number of space items can lead to the state where he object density is so high that one collision is enough to generate a cascade effect, leading to further collisions.
 

0bserver

New Member
Actually, space debris became an important issue in the modern world of space exploration area. The big number of space junk can damage expensive spacecrafts The growing number of space items can lead to the state where he object density is so high that one collision is enough to generate a cascade effect, leading to further collisions.
You mean the Kessler Effect? This is why it is now a requirement that any satellite that is ending its lifespan needs to be either deorbited or in reverse, boosted into a 'graveyard orbit'. It's not really a new problem, it's old and laws have been made to handle it. You can look up 'graveyard orbits'.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
You mean the Kessler Effect? This is why it is now a requirement that any satellite that is ending its lifespan needs to be either deorbited or in reverse, boosted into a 'graveyard orbit'. It's not really a new problem, it's old and laws have been made to handle it. You can look up 'graveyard orbits'.
You can also provide a link to graveyard orbits to help people out. It's a common courtesy.
 

bearnard19

Member
You mean the Kessler Effect? This is why it is now a requirement that any satellite that is ending its lifespan needs to be either deorbited or in reverse, boosted into a 'graveyard orbit'. It's not really a new problem, it's old and laws have been made to handle it. You can look up 'graveyard orbits'.
Yeah, you are right. The growing number of space items can lead to what is known as the ‘Kessler syndrome’, which represents a state where the object density is so high that one collision is enough to generate a cascade effect, leading to further collisions. Some space junk can burn down in the atmosphere but unfortunately it`s just a small percentage of those space junk we are having in the Earth`s orbit
 

bearnard19

Member
Actually, there is a way out. I found an article on the website of
UK space news about the mission which is aimed at cleaning the orbit from space debris. The Clearspace-1 satellite, or ‘The Claw’, represents the first step towards a clean space environment by being the first space debris removal dedicated mission. The launch is about to happen in 2025
 

0bserver

New Member
Yeah, you are right. The growing number of space items can lead to what is known as the ‘Kessler syndrome’, which represents a state where the object density is so high that one collision is enough to generate a cascade effect, leading to further collisions. Some space junk can burn down in the atmosphere but unfortunately it`s just a small percentage of those space junk we are having in the Earth`s orbit
That might be a misleading statement that we are 'leaving junk in Earth's orbit' if most of it is in a graveyard orbit where it does not affect the near Earth space. You need to exclude the deliberately planned parked items to get a real picture of the unintended junk left in LEO.
 

bearnard19

Member
That might be a misleading statement that we are 'leaving junk in Earth's orbit' if most of it is in a graveyard orbit where it does not affect the near Earth space. You need to exclude the deliberately planned parked items to get a real picture of the unintended junk left in LEO.
Space junk don`t affect Earth at all.( that point I have already mentioned ) Space agences all around the world are worried about that issue as I`ve mentioned these space junk can damage expancive rockets and space crafts and as a resuld whole missions can be under threat
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
As commercial space companies are now responsible for most of the new space junk, perhaps it is time for a launch surcharge AND annual tracking fee to pay for the expense of tracking all the “stuff” based on the amount of orbital assets they have.

 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
As commercial space companies are now responsible for most of the new space junk, perhaps it is time for a launch surcharge AND annual tracking fee to pay for the expense of tracking all the “stuff” based on the amount of orbital assets they have.

Good idea, but who has to pay and who get the money?
Maybe the US government can ask the surchase and fee from NASA, Space X and other companies who launch from American soil, but i don't expect ESA, Roskosmos and other foreign agencies are willing to pay to the US, because they (can) have their own tracking system.

I think this will need new international agreements/ treaties to handle it properly.
 

John Fedup

The Bunker Group
Best case scenario, an international agreement figuring out who pays what to who. Given the current geopolitical state, the US can and maybe will, offer tracking only to paying friends, others can pound salt or provide there own tracking.
 

ngatimozart

Super Moderator
Staff member
Verified Defense Pro
I believe there are 12 countries that are currently active in space and IIRC of those 12 only 2, the US and NZ have active commercial programmes with private companies undertaking their own launches.

Before the private sector becomes fully involved in space launches I think that it is necessary for an international organisation under UN auspices be formed to sort out the space domain and space junk issue, much like the international air traffic system and UNCLOS. That way everyone knows what the rules are and what is expected.
 

bearnard19

Member
A recent inspection of the International Space Station's Canadarm2 has revealed that it was hit by orbital debris. See the hole that was created and a time-lapse of the robotic arm in action.
 

Sandhi Yudha

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #15
The U.S. AFRL (Air Force Research Laboratory), created the DSX-program to research the Van Allen radiation belts and their effect on spacecraft components.

After launch in July 2019 the longer pair of the 80-meter antenna booms (about 262 feet) was successfully deployed, which makes the DSX the largest unmanned structure ever in space. The long antenna allows DSX to transmit the VLF radio waves that will be used in experiments to collect data about the Val Allen radiation belt.

The DSX spacecraft has a total mass of 600 kg, its dimensions are stowed 3.6 m x 2 m x 1.1 m and 81 m x 17 m x 8 m in completely deployed condition.

Last month, nearly two years after it launched and a year after its mission was expected to end, AFRL decommissioned the satellite. AFRL completed end-of-life processes for DSX on 31 May 2021. The lab did not give details on what happens to the shut-down satellite.



 
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