International Space Station (ISS)

Sandhi Yudha

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There wasn't yet a thread about the International Space Station, but the largest and heaviest man-made structure orbiting the World deserves an own thread.

Construction of the ISS is almost finished, with only a small amount of components/modules still to be installed, including the Nauka with the European Robotic Arm, the Prichal module, and two power modules called NEM-1 and NEM-2.

The Nauka module was just launched two days ago on 21 July 2021 and will dock at Zvezda's nadir port, replacing the Pirs module that will be undocking on 24 July 2021 together with the Progress cargo spacecraft, and deorbiting four hours later with it.

The bus-sized Nauka research module — also known as the Multipurpose Laboratory Module, or MLM — has been in development for more than 20 years, originally as a backup for Russia’s Zarya module, the first element of the space station to launch in 1998. Russia said in 2004 that the backup to Zarya would be converted into a lab module for launch in 2007.

Designed to support scientific experiments, the module measures about 13 meters long and weighs about 20,2 metric tons fully fueled for launch. The Nauka module carries the European Robotic Arm, which was completed 15 years ago to await an opportunity to fly to the space station.

So the original plan was actually to send the Nauka module to the ISS in 2007, but technical and financial problems caused the delay of 14 years.

The Nauka module will dock to the ISS at the nadir (Earth facing) port of the Zvezda module. As we can see on the Wikipedia image below, that place is now occupied by the Pirs docking module. To make place for the Nauka module, Pirs will undock on 24 July 2021 from the ISS together with the Progress MS-16 cargo spacecraft attached to it. Progress MS-16 will then deorbit four hours later with Pirs to finally re-entry Earth atmosphere.

The docking of Nauka on the ISS is planned for 29 July 2021.
 

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Sandhi Yudha

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There were some unexpected challenges on the way from Earth to ISS, and there were also some technical problems after docking, but eventually everything is alright now.

 

Sandhi Yudha

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With the docking of the Prichal module to the Nauka multi-purpose lab module, the final planned piece of the Russian segment of the ISS has been placed.



The Russian NEM-1 and NEM-2 are modules that were originally planned to arrive at the ISS no earlier than 2024, and dock to the Prichal module, which is now attached to the Nauka module. In April 2021, Roscosmos announced that NEM-1 would be repurposed to function as the core module of the proposed Russian Orbital Service Station (ROSS).

So NEM-1, also known as Science Power Module 1 (SPM-1), will undergo 1.5–2 years of redesign to prepare the module for its new role as part of ROSS. As of April 2021, NEM-1 is scheduled to launch in 2025 on an Angara A5 launch vehicle.
 
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Sandhi Yudha

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Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa has safely returned to Earth today with Soyuz MS-20 after a 12- day journey into space, ending a practice run for his planned trip around the moon with founder Elon Musk’s SpaceX in 2023.

If im not wrong this is the first time that two space tourists in one flight are sent to the ISS.

Shipenko and Peresild were also sent to space together on the Soyuz MS-19 and spent about twelve days on the ISS before returning to Earth aboard Soyuz MS-18, but they were filming a movie in space, and are because of that officially not tourists.

It seems that Maezawa Yusaku has paid $70 million for both tickets.
 
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ngatimozart

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Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa has safely returned to Earth today with Soyuz MS-20 after a 12- day journey into space, ending a practice run for his planned trip around the moon with founder Elon Musk’s SpaceX in 2023.

If im not wrong this is the first time that two space tourists in one flight are sent to the ISS.

Shipenko and Peresild were also sent to space together on the Soyuz MS-19 and spent about twelve days on the ISS before returning to Earth aboard Soyuz MS-18, but they were filming a movie in space, and are because of that officially not tourists.

It seems that Maezawa Yusaku has paid $70 million for both tickets.
Jealous I am. extremely jealous. I too would like to soar into the cosmos and visit the ISS, but I don't think that they've built a rocket large enough to lift my arse into space yet, let alone squeeze me into the ISS. Bugger.
 

Sandhi Yudha

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Jealous I am. extremely jealous. I too would like to soar into the cosmos and visit the ISS, but I don't think that they've built a rocket large enough to lift my arse into space yet, let alone squeeze me into the ISS. Bugger.
Than we have to wait for the SpaceX Starship, which has a diameter of around 9 meters, while the Soyuz has a diameter of 2,72 m. Starship is expected to have 1,100 m3 (39,000 cu ft) of storage volume, also that is a little bit more than the 10,5 cubic meters of the Soyuz MS-20.

That has to be big enough to store both our arses.
 

Sandhi Yudha

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The Russian Roscosmos state space agency and NASA are in talks on extending the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) until 2030 and engineering support for the Zarya module carried out by Russia will be done until at least 2024.

 
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