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Indian Navy

Discussion in 'Navy & Maritime' started by gf0012-aust, Dec 10, 2016.

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  1. gf0012-aust

    gf0012-aust Grumpy Old Man Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    catchall thread for Indian Navy issues
     
  2. gf0012-aust

    gf0012-aust Grumpy Old Man Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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  3. colay1

    colay1 New Member

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    It isn't a rosy picture as some may have expected. The US can bring all it's technical expertise and experience but there would be cultural obstacles to surmount in the partnership. Still you have to start somewhere I guess.

    US team alarmed at technical flaws as it helps construction of Indian aircraft carrier

    US team alarmed at technical flaws as it helps construction of Indian aircraft carrier

    The Indian indigenous carrier construction was launched in 2011 at the Cochin shipyard. The hull was launched in 2013 and the ship was expected to be combat ready by 2018. However, a recent assessment made by #US Navy technical team which is assisting the construction of the carrier has sent alarm signals to the Pentagon. From the state of affairs the team has concluded that the aircraft carrier may not be ready for another 10 years. This is cause for alarm as the aircraft carrier was to be part of the strategic relationship and a counter to China...

    An inspection by the US team has revealed glaring technical flaws in the construction of the warship. Firstly the warship is being made at the Cochin shipyard which has never constructed a warship earlier. The project which has already cost the government of India $ 3 billion is 5 years behind schedule. and the navy which is sticking to the 2018 deadline is unlikely to have the aircraft carrier ready by that date...

    Carrier defects
    Apart from the shoddy workmanship the US team is alarmed that the weapon systems for the carrier are nowhere ready. Many of the proposed systems for assault may never fit into the carrier as the hull was made before the navy thought of the weapon systems onboard.


    More
     
  4. colay1

    colay1 New Member

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    Originally commissioned by the Royal Navy as the HMS Hermes, the Indian Navy finally puts the old war horse out to pasture ie. scrapyard.

    https://news.usni.org/2017/03/06/worlds-oldest-aircraft-carrier-ins-viraat-decommissions

    The world’s oldest aircraft carrier was decommissioned today during a sunset ceremony in Mumbai ahead of an uncertain future for the ship hull.

    The almost 60-year-old carrier INS Viraat (R22) could now be sold for scrap or sunk after a plan to turn the ship into a multi-use hotel, museum and convention center space stalled, the chief of staff of the Indian Navy told reporters
     
  5. t68

    t68 Active Member

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    Maybe the Chinese will be it and study or use as a working model after all I think it was about 20 before they actually scraped Melbourne :dance
     
  6. DaveS124

    DaveS124 Member

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    Busy time on the Indopac jointex front.

    Excerpts from a report from The Diplomat.


    Indian warships arrive in Australia for military exercise


    The Indian Navy and Royal Australian Navy will hold their first-ever bilateral naval drill off the coast of Western Australia this month.

    Franz-Stefan Gady
    June 13, 2017

    Three Indian warships arrived in the port city of Freemantle in Western Australia on June 13 to participate in a week-long naval exercise off the Western Australian coast.

    The so-called Exercise Australia-India (AUSINDEX) is the first-ever bilateral military exercise in Australian waters involving the Indian Navy and Royal Australian Navy and aims to develop “a deeper understanding and cooperation between the two navies,” according to an Australian Department of Defense statement.

    As my colleague Ankit Panda pointed out last month, this exercise will be the second overall bilateral naval drill between the two countries, following the first-ever AUSINDEX held in the Bay of Bengal in 2015. Both countries have also held a number of other military drills over the years.

    Politically, the joint naval drill will be of special importance for the two countries as India declined an Australian request to participate in the Indian-led Malabar naval exercise this year, which involves the navies of India, Japan, and the United States out of a fear of antagonizing China.However, speaking at Fremantle, the commanding officer of the Indian Navy’s Eastern Fleet, Rear Admiral Biswajit Dasgupta, said the final decision was yet to be made, ABC News reports.

    Entire article here - Indian Warships Arrive in Australia for Military Exercise | The Diplomat
     
  7. DaveS124

    DaveS124 Member

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    Excellent account in the Diplomat, a couple of excerpts here. As per everywhere else, ASW is well and truly back in fashion.

    Not mentioned but worth noting is the size and scale of concurrent INDOPAC jointexes by the USN, namely Malabar and Talisman Sabre: each has a CVN group, and with no more than six hulls available the admirals can't push them around the way they did in the 80s, when they last had a Very Big Worry to contend with. Of the current six, only three are deployed (CVNs 68, 76, 77) at moment.

    The complete article at the link here - India-Japan-US Malabar 2017 Naval Exercises Kick Off With Anti-Submarine Warfare in Focus | The Diplomat
     
  8. colay1

    colay1 New Member

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    The PLAN is reportedly employing EMALS on their future conventional CATOBAR carrier and India seems likely to go the same route. Perhaps the US involvement in the IN's CV program has injected some pragmatism into their thinking and IAC-II may not be a nulke-powered ship.

    Navy to use U.S. aircraft launch system in ship - The Hindu

    The Navy is likely to go with an advanced catapult-based aircraft launch mechanism (CATOBAR) from the U.S. for its second indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC-II), which is on the drawing board. For some time, India has been exploring the possibility of installing the U.S. electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS)...

    However, the system is expensive, something that needs to be factored in.

    “EMALS will allow us to operate heavy surveillance aircraft in addition to heavy fighters,” another officer observed...

    ...While the Navy is keen on nuclear propulsion, which would give it unlimited range and endurance, its development in time seems doubtful.
     
  9. StobieWan

    StobieWan Super Moderator Staff Member

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  10. John Fedup

    John Fedup Active Member

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    Perhaps basic training on things like closing a frigging hatch should be done on less expensive diesel/electric subs.
     
  11. RobWilliams

    RobWilliams Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Couldn't believe it when I first read about it, I was curious why we hadn't heard much from her recently.
     
  12. StobieWan

    StobieWan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    We don't know all of it however - Squalus was lost at sea when diving with the main induction valve open (that's a very large intake!) It's still not known today if the valve wasn't closed or if the status was reported incorrectly on the board.It's tempting to ascribe it to human error but I don't think that's know as yet?
     
    ngatimozart likes this.