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Australian Space Agency

Discussion in 'Space Technology' started by hauritz, Dec 12, 2018.

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  1. hauritz

    hauritz Well-Known Member

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    South Australia will be home to Australia' s new space agency. Just sounds like baby steps at the moment but by 2030 the space industry could create up to 20,000 jobs.

    SA beats strong competition to be home to Australia's new space agency

    It is also good to see Australia once again seriously getting back into the space industry. A little known fact is that Australia was actually the third nation to build and launch a satellite back in the 1960s. Joe Bjelke-Petersen ... the former premier of Queensland ... was pushing the idea of a spaceport back in the 1980s. For those who remember old Joe you would hardly describe him as a visionary but even he saw the potential of this industry.

    Anyway with around a hundred satellites launched every year and that number expected to increase dramatically over the coming decades its good to see Australia belatedly re-entering the space industry.
     
  2. Stampede

    Stampede Active Member

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    Good to see Australia coming on board with this Industry.
    Congrats to SA for getting the space gig, but can anyone confirm if there is an advantage in launching rockets closer to the equator.
    No expert in this field so happy to be advised.

    Regards S
     
  3. Ananda

    Ananda Well-Known Member

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    Why is it better to launch a spaceship from near the equator?

    Not an expert..but this can explain on the benefits of Equatorial Space Launch. In sense the earth moving faster in Equator thus space launch in Equator can benefit from inertia effect. This means you can launch more payload with relative less fuel relative to non Equator launch sites.

    At least that's what I read of.
     
  4. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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    Yes, launching closer to the equator is better as rockets don’t have to be as powerful since the surface velocity is highest at the equator and diminishes as you move to higher latitudes.
     
  5. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    We had another launch from the Mahia Peninsula with Rocket Labs first commercial launch on 11th November. They are also placing a NASA payload into orbit, I think, next launch.
     
  6. AndyinOz

    AndyinOz New Member

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    I'm still utterly devastated that my suggestion of the Australian Research (&) Space Enterprise was not adopted as the name for our space agency alas not to be. Rocket Labs next launch is meant to be a payload of about 80kg worth of nano-sats for NASA from what I recall reading somewhere.
     
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  7. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Some people just have no sense of humour. :D:D:D
     
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  8. FoxtrotRomeo999

    FoxtrotRomeo999 Member

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  9. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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  10. foxdemon

    foxdemon Member

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    Hi Ananda, apa Akbar? The best launch site depends on the sort of orbit you are after.

    For polar obits, a launch to the north/south is what you want. Ideally, this launch would not pass over populated areas. So SA or NZ are actually pretty good choices for that. Look into America’s issues with polar orbit launches to learn more.

    If you want an equatorial orbit, which you might for heavy lift and deep space stuff, then a location on the equator would be the right choice. Again, you want a launch trajectory over water, being less populated than land. And the rocket gets fired off to the east. PNG’s Manus Island is an exemplary example of a suitable location. I hope the locals won’t mind a bit more stuff being built there. Kiribati already has Japanese tracking facilities installed. So there is a real possibility of establishing Asia’s future space port infrastructure along the equatorial Pacific.

    Just remember there are different types of orbits. Polar orbit is fine for the naval recon cube stats NZ and Oz are working on.
     
  11. seaspear

    seaspear Member

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    With Canada joining N.A.S.A in its Gateway Luna project to have a orbital manned station above the moon that can have astronauts potentially do further luna landings , Canada contributed over 1 billion dollars to be the first international partner ,
    Is this something Australia could consider becoming involved in
     
  12. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    I can understand it from a purely scientific point of view, and that Canada is a partner in the International Space Station, but in an Australian context why? What would be in it for Australia to justify such a large outlay?
     
  13. seaspear

    seaspear Member

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    If you were to ask what was in it as a financial return , the answer may be nothing ,but to be involved in the cutting edge of the various technologies at a time when Australia has not been could have its own benefits if Australia can identify what it can develop and contribute .
    In the long term taking samples may be the start of accessing resources unavailable on Earth
    JPL | The Lunar Gold Rush: How Moon Mining Could Work
    Mining Moon Ice: Prospecting Plans Starting to Take Shape
    But naturally there has to be a planned outcome of what is intended long term so that those involved understand the costs risks and benefits , the Gateway Luna Project has not to date but this could change ,not being involved in a project that may produce strategic resources may put Australia at a disadvantage also consider other partners in this include the European Russian and Chinese space agencies .
     
  14. tonnyc

    tonnyc Member

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    Basic science research is always a good thing to invest, so if Australia wants to invest in the Lunar-Gateway I wish you guys well. Who knows what useful things will be discovered from space-based research.

    But if Australia want to do resource exploitation, then the Gateway is not the best investment. Australia will be better off investing in either an Earth-orbit space station like the ISS, or further ahead, invest in near-Earth asteroid exploration and exploitation.

    Most moon mining proponents point to He3 as the main resource to be exploited, arguing that this is fuel for fusion power. That's correct but also conveniently fails to mention that we have not been able to make fusion work economically. At this moment we still needs to put more energy into it than we get out of it and we can't control the fusion for any commercially useful length of time yet. There is also no guarantee that the fusion technology that we invent will use He3. The deuterium + He3 fusion is just one of several available fusion pathways and I don't think a fusion tech geared toward a pathway can easily be adapted to a different pathway.

    Realistically the possible immediately useful resources that we can get from the moon are rare earths and ice. These I believe can be gained more profitably via asteroid mining, though lunar ice may be available faster than asteroid ice. I don't think there is much hope of any solid return on investment in the Gateway project and it should be looked at purely as a basic research project.
     
  15. John Fedup

    John Fedup Well-Known Member

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    The amount and quality of lunar ice is of the upmost importance. Without a good source of water, no hydrogen and oxygen for lunar production of rocket fuel. Oxygen transport from earth for life support would be problematic for a large group needed for mining. This limits all other lunar activities from being economically viable.
     
  16. hauritz

    hauritz Well-Known Member

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    NASA’s surprise Aussie pick for rocket launch

    Nasa has signed a deal to launch rockets from 2020. Equatorial Launch Australia is looking at creating a spaceport in the Northern Territory. These won't be your huge heavy lift rockets. Mostly small suborbital rockets for data collection and engineering tests.
     
  17. ngatimozart

    ngatimozart Super Moderator Staff Member Verified Defense Pro

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    Ah well NASA that's ok. Here we just launch DARPA satellites from Mahia Peninsula in a Kiwi / US rocket :D

    Huge Shit Stirrer-500x500.jpg
     
  18. hauritz

    hauritz Well-Known Member

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    Good to see the Newbies getting into the satellite biz. We used to launch satellites from Woomera ... about 50 years ago.
     
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