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Go Bag - contents and rationale

This is a discussion on Go Bag - contents and rationale within the Self Defense forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; Originally Posted by Todjaeger I know this is a dangerous sign, but I had an additional thought here. If there ...


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Old November 6th, 2017   #106
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I know this is a dangerous sign, but I had an additional thought here. If there is the potential that would might need to head towards the regional hospital, and especially if you might need to arrange an ambulance or medevac intercept, have you considered kit which can make arranging that intercept safer and easier?

I have some coloured smoke signal grenades for SAR work that I can use to signal an aircraft LZ in the daytime. During stormy or overcast conditions as well as at night I have phosphorous flares and waterproof LED strobe signals. Something to consider at least.
I should get some boating flares

It would be definitely something I would take if I was on a serious hike. The bush is impossibly thick. Twisted ankle or broken leg or fall(which is easy to do on the rugged rocky ground) and they would have great difficulty finding you, even from a helicopter directly above. Even with an ERB.I never used to worry about it, but then an international student went missing near my backyard after a doof, they never found him even after looking for 12 months with dogs and aircraft.

So it would be something I would carry now. Flares are light and cheap.

All of my kits have multiple torches. I probably own 20+ torches. We use them all the time. I love those small 3xaaa short and stubby led ones. I lost one hiking once, then found it 12 months later. Still works.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #107
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My niece brought a life straw water filter bottle with her while travelling in Tanzania's Serengeti. Didn't have to use it though. Google lifestraw for information. My main item while winter traveling in Ontario is a warm sleeping bag.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #108
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My niece brought a life straw water filter bottle with her while travelling in Tanzania's Serengeti. Didn't have to use it though. Google lifestraw for information. My main item while winter traveling in Ontario is a warm sleeping bag.
Those lifestraws are rated very highly.

But they don't remove salt. Don't improve drinking your pee much either, apparently.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #109
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Those lifestraws are rated very highly.

But they don't remove salt. Don't improve drinking your pee much either, apparently.
The do not remove salt, and I would not trust them to remove a number of other potential dissolved chemicals either. They are very good to have just in case, but one always needs to consider the quality of their water source prior to doing any water treatment.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #110
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I guess when it comes to water, plastic bottled water is handy. In Ontario it is not uncommon to see a case of 24 bottles, 400-500 mL, on sale for under $2 a case. Keeping 3-4 cases around at these prices makes sense.
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Old 4 Weeks Ago   #111
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I guess when it comes to water, plastic bottled water is handy. In Ontario it is not uncommon to see a case of 24 bottles, 400-500 mL, on sale for under $2 a case. Keeping 3-4 cases around at these prices makes sense.
I have 45,000 litres of storage on the farm. But I need a new generator to pump more water up the hill.

But it is useful to have bottled water. If you need to run out you can grab one for each person or just grab the lot. People lose their mind when water is shut off. If there is ever an emergency handing out water bottles can make it a lot more comfortable for others as well.

When I used to drive longer kms than i do now. I always had a 6x1litre pack in the boot.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #112
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I guess when it comes to water, plastic bottled water is handy. In Ontario it is not uncommon to see a case of 24 bottles, 400-500 mL, on sale for under $2 a case. Keeping 3-4 cases around at these prices makes sense.
In emergency situations, there is a Rule of Threes which is different than the one commonly used for military forces.

For survival, a person can typically last:
3 minutes without air
3 hours without shelter
3 days without water
3 weeks without food

Of course this is on average, and subject to situational and conditional environments.

Having said that, and with the caveat that I hate the notion of spending money on buying water... I keep four cases (24x 500 mL bottles ea) stored at home, because purchased water has a longer shelf-life than water I can store on my own. I also having additional water containers which I keep in the freezer. Incidentally doing that is a potentially helpful trick in the event of a prolonged power outage helping to keep the contents cold while not making a mess and being a source of drinking water. I use the same trick when loading a cooler bag rather than using ice packs or bags of ice.

In terms of Go Bags though, there is a limit to how much water is practical to carry due to both volume and especially weight. Water is nearly 1 kg per L and while a normal adult with a relatively sedentary life might only need to consume 1.2 L per day, that number can quickly rise to 4-5 L per day if making considerable exertions, or high temp and humidity conditions. Carrying nearly 5 kg of water, plus other gear tends to get old very quickly.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #113
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I spend a fair bit of time prospecting here in the NT. Its 30 deg days all year round, except in the hot months, Sept - March where its typically 34 in town and 36-40 out bush with extreme humidity. I carry an Engel in my car (permanently) and always have a 15lt jerry in the back as well. I usually go through about 6 Lt a day whilst detetecting, and another 2 driving home in the aircon. As well as a couple of Pepsi Max's. I always carry a filter bottle, 1lt, similar to a life straw, but it also filters chemicals. Other bits I carry when out bush, keeping in mind I try to travel light, is a head torch, my phone, a solar battery bank, smokes,a lighter, a knife, a leathermans, a light weight raincoat, a couple of Musli bars, a GPS, spare batteries, and water. I use an old army canteen (with the alloy cup) and 2 South African 2 Lt bottles. All in a small day pack. That is standard every time I leave my car to go prospecting. Once I suffered heat exhaustion, didn't have my GPS with me, got confused and walked up the same hill twice after circling around it. Lucky I did have my phone, and google maps saved my life! I was in big trouble, no water left, getting dark, and extremely hot and humid. When I got back to the car. I drank, poured about 5 lt over my head,and just sat with engine running with the aircon on for about an hour. Never left the GPS at home since!
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