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Do you know how much a corvette warship cost?

This is a discussion on Do you know how much a corvette warship cost? within the Navy & Maritime forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; I know that a corvette is traditionally the smallest class of vessel considered to be a proper warship. Unfortunately, I ...


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Old February 24th, 2017   #1
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Do you know how much a corvette warship cost?

I know that a corvette is traditionally the smallest class of vessel considered to be a proper warship.

Unfortunately, I do not have a clear idea about how much a fully equipped corvette can cost.

I would like if possible to get some examples of such warships together with the price that was paid per unit.
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Old February 24th, 2017   #2
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I know that a corvette is traditionally the smallest class of vessel considered to be a proper warship.

Unfortunately, I do not have a clear idea about how much a fully equipped corvette can cost.

I would like if possible to get some examples of such warships together with the price that was paid per unit.
Not going to happen. There are a large number of factors which together will determine the cost of a military purchase. For something as large and complex as a warship, details of the contract would need to known.

For example, how large is the corvette?
What is the fitout like?
How many will be ordered?

All of these will impact the price for the programme and per unit costs.

If you do research you might some cost details from existing corvette build programmes. That can give you an idea of what that particular design cost. A different design could have a completely different cost.
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Old February 24th, 2017   #3
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Not going to happen. There are a large number of factors which together will determine the cost of a military purchase. For something as large and complex as a warship, details of the contract would need to known.

For example, how large is the corvette?
What is the fitout like?
How many will be ordered?

All of these will impact the price for the programme and per unit costs.

If you do research you might some cost details from existing corvette build programmes. That can give you an idea of what that particular design cost. A different design could have a completely different cost.
Agree.

And of course there are other things to throw into the mix such as: maintenance, spares, training, weapons stock to go with the weapons systems, etc, etc, and the list goes on and on.

It really is a 'how long is a piece of string' question.
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Old February 24th, 2017   #4
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I just asked for examples with the price attached.

For instance, a Visby-class corvette cost 184 mil. dollars.
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Old February 24th, 2017   #5
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I just asked for examples with the price attached.

For instance, a Visby-class corvette cost 184 mil. dollars.
Yes, but without knowing more about that contract, you have no idea what is actually included. It could just be the hull and electronics, it could include the weapon
systems, machinery, fuel, munitions, etc.

Plus that cosr you mentioned might also include modifications to facilities ashore, training, upkeep and support like John mentioned.

IIRC there is a threaf in the aviation/airforce category which discusses the pricing of aircraft. Many of the same issues apply to pricing warships, with the added complication that there is more variation found in warships which can impact price. Changing the AAM used in a fighter is unlikely to require a significant structural change. Changing the SAM used in a ship could require a different launcher, with the associated structural changes.
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Old February 24th, 2017   #6
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and then there could be through life costs, which for a 30 year life cycle could be close to half the overall contracted price

there is no "blue book" price for how warships are costed as all pricing is country and configuration specific

let alone inclusive raise, train, sustain costs
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Old February 24th, 2017   #7
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For basic pricing for goverment tenders they should have a general idea on how much the hull would cost and a ballpark figure for the add on's after all they just don't pull out a program cost out of thin air.

But agree every nation is different and would have a per ton figure, but that string becomes long when they decide how they want to pimp it out.
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Old February 24th, 2017   #8
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How long is a piece of string?
As others have tried to explain, there are so many variables to a contract that a definitive answer is nearly impossible to arrive at.
Corvettes are, by definition, cheap gap fillers in a navy that needs a particular capability that its larger ships are unable to provide. This could be because the larger ships take too long to build and there is an urgent need. As was the case in WWII when convoy escorts needed to be found quickly and cheaply. Normally they are simply armed for the tasks at hand, and are seen to be expendable.
If the current crop of corvettes lasts a full 30 years in service, I will be very surprised.
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Old February 24th, 2017   #9
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If the current crop of corvettes lasts a full 30 years in service, I will be very surprised.
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they would generally be a 20-25 year life cycle in a modern military - and much longer once disposed of and regifted after refurb

then there is the australian example of corvette sized vessels lasting less than half their assumed life due to changes in tempo, design flaw issues etc etc....

but there is not even a baseline price for a barebones hull from the vendor. I know of vessels of the same configuration prior to design changes being offered at different prices to different countries due to the fact that the negotiating behaviour of the countries was different, so the vendor built in "hurt" early
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Old February 25th, 2017   #10
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Because none of the answers were helpful I have done more research and finally found that a fully functional corvette can cost between $116 and $309 million. In general, the torpedoes, rockets, missiles are not included but other weapons like deck guns, the radar, electronic equipment are.

In conclusion, a large corvette, about 100 m long, fully equipped including missiles and torpedoes, will not go much above $300 mil.

CORVETTES
https://newwars.wordpress.com/warship-costs/

Baynunah (UAE)-$137 million
Braunschweig K-130 (Germany)-$309 million
Falaj 2 (UAE)-$136 million
Khareef (Oman)-$262 million
Kedah (Malaysia)-$300 million
BAM Maritime Action Ship (Spain)-$116 million
MILGEM corvettes (Turkey)-$250 million
Sigma (Indonesian/Moroccan)-$222 million
Visby (Sweden)-$184 million
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Old February 25th, 2017   #11
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Because none of the answers were helpful I have done more research and finally found that a fully functional corvette can cost between $116 and $309 million. In general, the torpedoes, rockets, missiles are not included but other weapons like deck guns, the radar, electronic equipment are.
seriously mate.

you are dealing with people in here who have worked on builds, have done procurement assessments and are maritime engineers, some of us have evaluated boats and ships as part of our day job

if you are not going to listen to people with actual experience you may want to consider joining another site
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Old February 25th, 2017   #12
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Maybe they are naval engineers but as long as their answers are of no help for me I do not appreciate them.
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Old February 25th, 2017   #13
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Maybe they are naval engineers but as long as their answers are of no help for me I do not appreciate them.
if that's your attitude then I've made the decision for you.

your own research showed some of the very things people tried politely to explain.

perhaps you'll fit in elsewhere
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Old February 25th, 2017   #14
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and for anyone who bothers to refer to the link used - its basically meaningless as it ignores some of the very things discussed in here earlier - any number of countries referred to across various types use different through life costs - so the numbers quoted provide nothing but an end state number - with no detail as to the through life assessments and models used

eg just wrt to 5I's members - all of us use different through life calculations

so despite the OP and now banned individual thinking that he had come across answers to his initial question - he has not.

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as was said "how long is a piece of string"
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