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Made in Singapore Equipment

This is a discussion on Made in Singapore Equipment within the Army & Security Forces forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; Originally Posted by Ananda Forgot the unit number. But as far as the Army tends to admit FH 2000 in ...


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Old October 1st, 2009   #46
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Forgot the unit number. But as far as the Army tends to admit FH 2000 in our arsenal only equip one baterry. However there's rumours that's it actually two baterries. All with APU.
Seems the army taking FH 2000 to acquantience them with 155 mm. The largest calibre before was 122mm.

From what I heard when ST get the order of 155 mm (FH 2000), they offered join development of 155 mm with Pindad. But seems the support from the army more on light weight 105 mm. Thus Pindad acquaired license from Oto Melara with 105 light weight field howitzer.

With that, I don't see our army will get more 155 mm soon. However from unconfirmed sources, the Army also submit replacement for the self propelled french originated 105 mm Mk 61. The army already take a look on Primus, however also got a look with Samsung K 9 Thunder.
But again seems the focus now on the artillery are more light weight 105 mm and more MLRS 122mm which now under development (taking cues from Russian design).
122mm calibre? Do you mean howitzers or MLRS like the RM70 Grad from Kormar?
As far as i know we only have 76mm, 105 mm (M101A1/M2A2 and LG-1) and a couple of FH-2000s (according a book about the biggest armies of the world, with full of errors and wrong information, just 5 pieces of FH-2000)
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Old October 15th, 2009   #47
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15 October 2009 - A US subsidiary of ST Engineering, VT Miltope has won a US$500m contract (about S$710m) to supply the At Platform Automatic Test Systems (APATS) Maintenance Support Device - Version 3 (MSD-V3) system, comprising rugged laptops, test equipment and instruments, to the US Army....

Teamed with subcontractor, Science and Engineering Services, Inc. (SESI), VT Miltope is expected to perform 70% of the programme and SESI the remaining 30%. VT Miltope will supply the MSD-V3, based on the TSC V3-GM45 Rugged Convertible Laptop Computer, the next generation of its TSC-750 computer. The TSC-750M is a militarised laptop designed and qualified to withstand the harshest tactical environment for computer systems and is being used in forward areas under extreme weather and handling conditions.

More than 40,000 of the TSC-750-based MSDs have previously been supplied to the US Army. Many of these systems are already successfully deployed with US troops in active missions. In the five production programme years (2010-2014) of MSD-V3, the US Army may order up to 39,460 MSD-V3 Kits, 12,500 ICE Test Adapter Kits, and peripheral accessory hardware such as PC cards and cables...
Technically, the above mentioned products may not be made in Singapore but I've included it here anyway. Defense News has also reported on it here. [h/t to weseal1962]
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Old November 3rd, 2009   #48
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Impressive system the 120 SRAMS, OPSSG! Really inovative!
Thanks for posting
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Old November 3rd, 2009   #49
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Impressive system the 120 SRAMS, OPSSG! Really inovative!
Thanks for posting
You are welcome. It is my pleasure. BTW, the 120mm SRAMS has been mounted on:

(i) the Bronco and the light strike vehicle (LSV) - see post #7 in this thread for more info; and
(ii) the RG-31 (10-ton 4x4 armoured and mine-protected vehicle) and sold as to UAE as the AGRAB (Scorpion) (Click here for more AGRAB pixs).

Last edited by OPSSG; November 3rd, 2009 at 11:01 AM.
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Old November 4th, 2009   #50
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The triple 7 was designed with weight foremost in mind. The finished product reflects that pretty well, for example the lack of a flick rammer, the liberal use of titanium and the relative short barrel lenght. It enjoys a lot of success but has some understandable limitations. If deployability is not the key issue the Pegasus offers a interesting alternative.
another advantage that the pegasus has is that it is equipped with an auxillary power unit ,which gives it a limited mobility(shoot and scoot capability),this is not available in the m-777 and also explains the additional weight of the pegasus howitzer,

i believe that the lighter weight advantage of the m-777 is negated by the pegasus's higher degree of automation and superior mobility.
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Old November 5th, 2009   #51
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Don't you think calling pegasus a Self Propelled Gun is stretching the term a little, by that benchmark even FH77B would be a SPG due to its mercedezs APU.
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That's called slat or caged armour.
I am aware of what it it for. it was just a reflection of thought :P
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Old November 5th, 2009   #52
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122mm calibre? Do you mean howitzers or MLRS like the RM70 Grad from Kormar?
As far as i know we only have 76mm, 105 mm (M101A1/M2A2 and LG-1) and a couple of FH-2000s (according a book about the biggest armies of the world, with full of errors and wrong information, just 5 pieces of FH-2000)
Sandhi..sorry just getback to this thread, so it's onemonth old repply (hopefully OPSGG doesn't mind I derived a liitle bit on his thread).
The 122 mm that I'd mentioned was the old 122 mm ex yugo howitzer used by the marrines. Those actually being replaced by the light weight 105 mm.

The FH 2000, like I said are conflicting reports. One said only one baterry (standard in TNI was 6 - 8 but for FH 2000 seems 6 more likely). The other said two batteries. So at most only a dozen,but my self seems inclined more on the 6 numbers.
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Old November 8th, 2009   #53
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Don't you think calling pegasus a Self Propelled Gun is stretching the term a little, by that benchmark even FH77B would be a SPG due to its mercedezs APU.
I see you did not click on the links provided in my earlier post (quoted below again for your benefit).

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Since 2002, ST Kinetics has been working to perfect a Low Weight Self Propelled Howitzer (LWSPH) which is an advance over the Pegasus concept (click to see pix). The LWSPH has a maximum speed of 80 km/h, cruising range of 600 km and a slope-climbing capability of 60%. I think that is more interesting but not quite ready for prime time.
There is a wheeled self propelled version that was developed in 2002 (which is based on light strike vehicle chassis) and has not entered service in Singapore. I hope the above clarifies.

BTW, Singapore also has tracked Self Propelled artillery in operational service. It is called the Primus (click to see brochure) and a video is enclosed below:


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Originally Posted by aaaditya
another advantage that the pegasus has is that it is equipped with an auxillary power unit ,which gives it a limited mobility(shoot and scoot capability),this is not available in the m-777 and also explains the additional weight of the pegasus howitzer,

i believe that the lighter weight advantage of the m-777 is negated by the pegasus's higher degree of automation and superior mobility.
Thanks for the kind words. I usually try to be cautious in praise on Singapore made equipment, as I strive not to be blindly nationalistic over made in Singapore equipment (and I'm happy to discuss their limitations too).

Last edited by OPSSG; November 8th, 2009 at 09:59 AM.
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Old November 8th, 2009   #54
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Sandhi..sorry just get back to this thread, so it's one month old reply (hopefully OPSGG doesn't mind I derived a little bit on his thread).
As long as the Mods are also happy, I'm very easy going on slight detours.

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The 122 mm that I'd mentioned was the old 122 mm ex yugo howitzer used by the marines. Those actually being replaced by the light weight 105 mm.
The light weight 105mm howitzer is still in active service in a number of armies and it has a slightly smaller foot print compared to a 155mm howitzer, which is important for Indonesia, given your country's limited heli-lift and sea lift. As they say 'different strokes for different folks'.

To simplify our logistics and ammo versatility reasons, Singapore has chosen to standardize on the 155mm howitzer - a calibre that allows for fairly decent range (howitzers are also used for counter battery work) and the standardization of ammunition. The 155mm howitzer has a good range of sub-munitions (or otherwise known as cluster munitions/cargo rounds), pretty good fragmentation efficiency and adequate high explosive power. From a conventional warfare planning standpoint, the 64 sub-munitions of a cargo round can cover a larger area and potentially hit more targets at once than a single unitary round. Basically, fragments from unitary rounds lose velocity quickly, so it's much more efficient to use many small diameter fragmenting sub-munitions than a single large one. The conceptual downside for sub-munitions is the slightly elevated potential for blinds, which can pose a danger to your own troops (moving into the affected area/objective after the artillery barrage). However, this potential danger posed by sub-munitions can be mitigated with proper technology (via the use of advanced fuses) and stringent quality control. See the relevant ST Kinetics brochure on Singapore made cargo rounds here.
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The FH 2000, like I said are conflicting reports. One said only one battery (standard in TNI was 6 - 8 but for FH 2000 seems 6 more likely). The other said two batteries. So at most only a dozen,but my self seems inclined more on the 6 numbers.
I'm also inclined to believe that Indonesia has 6 FH-2000s (a 155mm/52 calibre towed howitzer, with APU). For Singapore, the FH-2000 is a divisional artillery asset and until the acquisition of the US made HIMARS by Singapore artillery, the FH-2000 was the longest range artillery piece in our inventory. HIMARS will provide a leap in the capabilities of Singapore artillery and augment our existing 155mm howitzers and 120mm mortars.

BTW, I may not be able to be prompt in my replies over the next two weeks.

Last edited by OPSSG; November 8th, 2009 at 07:56 PM.
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Old November 12th, 2009   #55
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As long as the Mods are also happy, I'm very easy going on slight detours.



The light weight 105mm howitzer is still in active service in a number of armies and it has a slightly smaller foot print compared to a 155mm howitzer, which is important for Indonesia, given your country's limited heli-lift and sea lift. As they say 'different strokes for different folks'.

To simplify our logistics and ammo versatility reasons, Singapore has chosen to standardize on the 155mm howitzer - a calibre that allows for fairly decent range (howitzers are also used for counter battery work) and the standardization of ammunition. The 155mm howitzer has a good range of sub-munitions (or otherwise known as cluster munitions/cargo rounds), pretty good fragmentation efficiency and adequate high explosive power. From a conventional warfare planning standpoint, the 64 sub-munitions of a cargo round can cover a larger area and potentially hit more targets at once than a single unitary round. Basically, fragments from unitary rounds lose velocity quickly, so it's much more efficient to use many small diameter fragmenting sub-munitions than a single large one. The conceptual downside for sub-munitions is the slightly elevated potential for blinds, which can pose a danger to your own troops (moving into the affected area/objective after the artillery barrage). However, this potential danger posed by sub-munitions can be mitigated with proper technology (via the use of advanced fuses) and stringent quality control. See the relevant ST Kinetics brochure on Singapore made cargo rounds here.


I'm also inclined to believe that Indonesia has 6 FH-2000s (a 155mm/52 calibre towed howitzer, with APU). For Singapore, the FH-2000 is a divisional artillery asset and until the acquisition of the US made HIMARS by Singapore artillery, the FH-2000 was the longest range artillery piece in our inventory. HIMARS will provide a leap in the capabilities of Singapore artillery and augment our existing 155mm howitzers and 120mm mortars.

BTW, I may not be able to be prompt in my replies over the next two weeks.
hey guys,great news here,it seems that the indian army has amended its decision against backlisted firms,allowing them to participate.

i guess this puts singapore kinetics back in the race to sell the pegasus howitzer to india.

here is the link and the article:

The Telegraph - Calcutta (Kolkata) | Nation | Govt eases arms firm blacklist rules

Two banned companies a Singaporean firm vying for a billion-dollar order for artillery guns and an Israeli arms supplier are hoping for a reprieve after the government today said it has amended the rules under which they were blacklisted in June.
The defence ministry has amended the rules that may allow the companies to participate in trials and tests but not to conclude contracts before the CBI completes its investigation.
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Old November 12th, 2009   #56
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hey guys,great news here,it seems that the indian army has amended its decision against backlisted firms,allowing them to participate.

i guess this puts singapore kinetics back in the race to sell the pegasus howitzer to india.

here is the link and the article:

The Telegraph - Calcutta (Kolkata) | Nation | Govt eases arms firm blacklist rules
Many, many thanks for the update.
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Old November 14th, 2009   #57
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I'm also inclined to believe that Indonesia has 6 FH-2000s (a 155mm/52 calibre towed howitzer, with APU). For Singapore, the FH-2000 is a divisional artillery asset and until the acquisition of the US made HIMARS by Singapore artillery, the FH-2000 was the longest range artillery piece in our inventory. HIMARS will provide a leap in the capabilities of Singapore artillery and augment our existing 155mm howitzers and 120mm mortars.

BTW, I may not be able to be prompt in my replies over the next two weeks.
"The extended-range MLRS rocket (ER-MLRS) improves the basic M26 range of 32km to more than 45km and the area of influence by 107%.

The extension of the rocket motor has resulted in a reduction in the payload to 518 M85 grenades, but the dispersion of the grenades is improved for better effectiveness with fewer grenades.

In April 2004, HIMARS successfully test fired the new extended range guided rocket GMLRS, with a range of more than 70km.
HIMARS is capable of firing the long-range ATACMS (army tactical missile system) guided missile. The ATACMS family includes the Block 1, Block 1A and Block 1A Unitary missiles. The block 1 missile delivers 950 anti-personnel anti-material (AP/AM) baseball-sized M74 submunitions to ranges exceeding 165km.

The block 1A missile range exceeds 300km by reducing the submunition payload to 300 bomblets and adding GPS guidance."

Even more than an Iskander-E (280 km)
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Old December 18th, 2009   #58
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"The extended-range MLRS rocket (ER-MLRS) improves the basic M26 range of 32km to more than 45km and the area of influence by 107%.


The extension of the rocket motor has resulted in a reduction in the payload to 518 M85 grenades, but the dispersion of the grenades is improved for better effectiveness with fewer grenades.

In April 2004, HIMARS successfully test fired the new extended range guided rocket GMLRS, with a range of more than 70km.
HIMARS is capable of firing the long-range ATACMS (army tactical missile system) guided missile. The ATACMS family includes the Block 1, Block 1A and Block 1A Unitary missiles. The block 1 missile delivers 950 anti-personnel anti-material (AP/AM) baseball-sized M74 submunitions to ranges exceeding 165km.

The block 1A missile range exceeds 300km by reducing the submunition payload to 300 bomblets and adding GPS guidance."

Even more than an Iskander-E (280 km)
As of now the SAF is operating 18 HIMARS launchers.Does anyone have information if
there are plans to procure more HIMARS?
What is the actual Leopard 2A4 MBT that SAF has?

Cheers!
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Old December 19th, 2009   #59
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Plain Leopard 2A4 so far. They are planning to upgrade them, but so far did not do it.
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Old January 5th, 2010   #60
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The French government has finally selected the latest version of the BAE Systems BvS10 MkII Viking all-terrain tracked vehicle over the Singaporean variant. Have to admit it does make sense, the UK and Dutch Marines use the same vehicle plus it was specifically designed to fit inside the current batch of landing craft / LSD's. I understand the Warthog is bigger reducing the number, which can be stored inside the current French amphib assets.

The UK plans to transfer it's batch of larger Warthogs to the army orbat and return the BvS10's (including recently ordered battlefield replacements) back to the RM ARG for the same reason as stated above.
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