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russian guided bombs

This is a discussion on russian guided bombs within the Space & Defense Technology forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; hey guys i have opened this thread to discuss latest russian guide bombs and to compare them with the latest ...


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Old November 29th, 2005   #1
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russian guided bombs

hey guys i have opened this thread to discuss latest russian guide bombs and to compare them with the latest french,us ,israeli and south african systems.

here is an interesting article i have found on the net regarding the russian guide bombs:

http://www.edefenseonline.com/defaul...=11_22_2005_OM

It was recently revealed that Russia is testing a new gliding guided bomb, as well as a new laser-guided bomb.

Russia is currently testing a new laser-guided bomb, the KAB-250L (seen here in the foreground), which is similar in appearance and in characteristics to the US GBU-12 Paveway II LGB.
Photo by Miroslav Gyurosi

The UPAB-1500KR ("izdyelye K-070" or "product K-070") is the first Russian gliding bomb. It was based on the KAB-1500KR guided bomb, with folded wings added to achieve a gliding capability. According to Russian sources, the range of UPAB-1500KR is 50-70 km, when dropped from high altitude and at high speed. The target picture is transmitted from a datalink on the bomb and received by the Raduga (Moscow, Russia) APK-8 datalink pod attached to the fuselage of the host aircraft. When the bomb nears its target, the aircrew marks the target, and the bomb is then attacking it independently, at which point it is locked onto the target.
The other new bomb being tested is the KAB-250L ("izdyelye K-045" or "product K-045") laser-guided bomb (LGB), similar in appearance and in characteristics to the US GBU-12 Paveway II LGB. Although there is not much information available on the KAB-250L, the bomb was recently developed by the FGUP State"s Scientific-Production Entity "Region." It has the same seeker as the KAB-500L/KAB-1500L (for a detailed description of these, see below), though in a modernized form. The bomb is controlled by front all-moving surfaces, while the tails are fixed. It is designed for export, as well as for domestic use. Testing of these bombs is being conducted by the 929th State's Aviation Test Center in Akhtubinsk, Russia.

In the late 1970s, Russia developed two new versions of the KAB-1500L: the KAB-1500L-F with a high-explosive (HE) warhead and the KAB-1500L-PR (seen here) with a penetration warhead.
Photo by Miroslav Gyurosi

All Russian and earlier Soviet guided bombs have been developed by the same organization – FGUP State's Scientific-Production Entity "Region" in Moscow. Various parts of the bombs, however, were developed by other companies. For example, the Tubus-2 TV seeker used in the UPAB-1500KR, KAB-500KR, and KAB-1500KR (as well as the Kh-29T and Kh-59 Ovod missiles) was developed by NPO Impuls (Akhtubinsk, Russia), the 27N1 semi-active laser seeker for the KAB-500L and KAB-1500L ("izdyelye K-015" or "product K-015") was developed by the Geofizyka-ART Scientific-Technological Production Complex (formerly NPO Geofizyka) (Moscow, Russia), and the control systems for the bombs were developed by OAO Tambovskiy Zavod "Elektropribor" (Tambov Russia; KAB-500KR has SU-601 control system while KAB-1500KR has SU-609 control system). The warhead for both bombs warhead was developed by FGUP GNPP "Bazalt" (Krasnoarmeysk near Moscow, Russia).
A History of Soviet/Russian Guided Bombs
The first attempts at developing guided bombs were undertaken in the Soviet Union from 1938 to1942 and again from 1947 to 1955. The latter attempts resulted in development of two guided bombs: the UB-2000F "Tshaika" and UB-5000F "Kondor," based on 2,000- and 5,000-kg heavy bombs, respectively,with radio-command guidance systems. (A TV-command system was tested but not accepted into service, because all work was terminated in late 1957.) Work was conducted by the GSNII-642 scientific institute in Moscow and led by Aleksandr D. Nadiradze. On July 20, 1955, the Tshaika was accepted into service with the designation UB-2F ("Izdyelye 4A-22"). Two such bombs could be carried by by Tu-16 bomber under the wings, or one UB-2F bomb could be carried under fuselage by an Il-28 bomber. GSNII-642 was later merged with OKB-52 from Reutovo near Moscow, led by Vladimir Chelomei, who is best known for his work on the development of anti-ship missiles. Nadiradze transferred to NII-1 in Moscow (now the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technologies), where he later headed development of solid-state strategic missiles (among them, the Topol, known as the SS-25).
Soviet work on guided bombs restarted in late 1971, when NIIPGM (now the FGUP State's Scientific-Production Entity "Region") was tasked to develop 250- and 500-kg guided bombs. The requirement was for laser-guided bombs to be used by the aircraft equipped with laser illuminator. The KAB-500 bomb with a semi-active laser guidance system was ready in early 1973 (the KAB designation came from the Russian "Korrektiruyemaya Aviabomba" for "aerial bomb with corrected trajectory"). The bomb's development was headed by N.S. Privalov, who decided to modify the bomb's aerodynamics with large tails with control surfaces and small, fixed front stabilizers. Thus, he managed to keep the tail span of the bomb within the 750-mm limit set by the Soviet Air Force. The bomb was equipped with a 27N1 semi-active laser seeker placed on the gimbals in the front, which could cooperate with the Kaira fire-control system used on Su-24M and MiG-27K aircraft (for more on Soviet/Russian fire-control systems, see "Eyes of the Eastern Eagles"). The 27N1 seeker can intercept the reflected laser signal from a distance of 5-7 km under conditions of 10-km visibility. The KAB-500, later redesignated KAB-500L, weighed 560 kg and had a 460-kg warhead with 200 kg of explosive. The bomb's length is just over 3 m, its diameter is 400 mm, and its tail span is 750 mm. The bomb could be dropped from altitudes from 500 to 5000 m at speeds of 550 to 1100 kmph. The maximum effective distance to the target for a drop is 9 km (assuming the seeker receives the illumination signal), while the minimum is 3 km. The bomb's accuracy is within 6-9 m.

While the UPAB-1500KR and KAB-250L are just now undergoing testing, the KAB-500S (seen here) is very close to entering service with Russian Air Force.
Photo by Miroslav Gyurosi

Factory tests of the KAB-500L were completed in June 1974, and the first phase of state testing ended in August 1975. Production started in 1976, though the bomb was officially accepted into service no earlier than 1979, after the full complement of state tests was completed.
Already, though, between 1975 and 1977, the same company kicked off development of a whole family of guided bombs, and a version of the KAB-500L with cluster warhead was developed. It was designated the KAB-500L-K and was designed to attack small armored units. The bomb's warhead was developed based on the RBK-500 free-fall cluster bomb, which contained 266 PTAB-1 anti-tank bomblets. The weight of the KAB-500L-K's warhead was 405 kg, while the whole bomb weighed 525 kg. The remaining parameters did not change, except the minimum distance to the target for the bomb drop, which was reduced to 2 km.


it is very big article and even more detailed article so iam not posting the whole article here you can check it out on the link that i have provided,iam specially interested in comparing it to the jdam.
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Old November 29th, 2005   #2
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Re: russian guided bombs

Hello,

Thank you for this interesting aritcle. In reference to the Glonass (Russian GPS) system I understood is was in a poor state due to a lack of the number of satellites which in turn effects the accuracry (CEP) of the russian GPS guided weapons. I knoew the russians wanted to build and launch more constellations of Glonass satellites, but of course, money is the issue.

Any one have any information about this to share
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Old November 29th, 2005   #3
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Re: russian guided bombs

There are currently 13 operational sats in the Glonass constellation. The design calls for 24 sats, so obviously there is very marginal coverage. The system is not currently certified for critical applications- i.e. navigation, targeting, etc. Dual band receivers that can receive GPS and Glonass signals are in use, and the Glonass sats are providing some minimal redundancy to the GPS system, but that's about it right now.

The first generation satellites were pretty short lived, 18-24 months normal service life. Of the 13 sats in operation, only 3 or 4 are newer designs which have a longer service life, the rest are first gen sats that are past their expected lifespan. The newer sats are designed for a 3-7 year lifespan, depending on the version.

Russia and India have agreed to try to get the system operational, but the launch schedules for the next few years are only sufficient to maintain the system at it's current level, so it remains to be seen if they will be successful in getting it back online. Russia's launcher is currently grounded after a couple of recent high profile failures (the solar sail sat, for one).
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Old November 29th, 2005   #4
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Thank you, I knkew the Glonass system was not weapon capable yet. Well not the "Near PGM" standard required. It interesting about india helping out, I heard the chinese were helping the EU out with there system. Any one know anything about that.
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Old November 29th, 2005   #5
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Re: russian guided bombs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Phobus
Thank you, I knkew the Glonass system was not weapon capable yet. Well not the "Near PGM" standard required. It interesting about india helping out, I heard the chinese were helping the EU out with there system. Any one know anything about that.
india has also joined the eu system known as the galileo.
currently india is involved in three projects :
1)galileo with the european union.
2)glosnass with russia(7 satellites to be launched from shar by 2010)
3)gagan with usa(primarily for civilian applications while the russian one will be primarily for defence applications).

iam sure these systems can also be used by the indian.
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Old November 29th, 2005   #6
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Re: russian guided bombs

Thank you for the update, I was incorrect about china then. So, they will be dependent on Glonass system. I see thought the russian "JDAM" like weapons are still a year away from wide spread deployment. Its amasing how the russians have fallen behind ! Saying that look how few european JDAM class weapons there are. The americans really did surgre ahead with the GPS system as a weapons guidance method, and everyone else is playing chatch up. How of ocurse the Americans have developed SDB, another step ahead, I underdstand a later block of SDB will have folding wings for greater range and a terminal IR seeker. THis will make the SDB more akin to the French 550lbs GPS/IR guided weapon.

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