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Russian Navy Discussions and Updates

This is a discussion on Russian Navy Discussions and Updates within the Navy & Maritime forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; I haven't seen this post before starting a new tread on Tu-160- http://www.defencetalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8200 These planes may have dedicated naval variants ...


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Old September 10th, 2008   #31
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I haven't seen this post before starting a new tread on Tu-160- Tu-160 strategic bombers: news & discussion

These planes may have dedicated naval variants later, like the TU-95/142 Bears.
Salty Dog, what's the difference between diesel aux. plant used for propulsion and fuel oil boilers (that what I meant in my last post)?
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Old September 10th, 2008   #32
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Originally Posted by Firehorse View Post
I haven't seen this post before starting a new tread on Tu-160- Tu-160 strategic bombers: news & discussion

These planes may have dedicated naval variants later, like the TU-95/142 Bears.
Salty Dog, what's the difference between diesel aux. plant used for propulsion and fuel oil boilers (that what I meant in my last post)?
Well, the fuel oil burning heats up the boilers producing steam which turns the turbines. The turbines would then be attached to the propeller shaft via a reduction gear.

The Diesel engines though, are auxiliary engines, they turn a generator coil to produce electricity, they don't go anywhere near the shafts.
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Old September 11th, 2008   #33
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There is no navalized variant of the Tu-160 to my knowledge.
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Old September 11th, 2008   #34
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There is no navalized variant of the Tu-160 to my knowledge.
The Russian were planning to develop an ASW version of the Tupolev Tu-204 airliner to replace its aging Beriev Be-12 `Mail' and Ilyushin Il-38 `May' aircraft. But, it looks like the A-42 will be Russia's longe range ASW platform of the future.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20080905/116569962.html
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Old September 11th, 2008   #35
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A big concern will be if the BCGN can make it down and back without breaking down. The Med cruise had her within a days steaming to any port, but an Atlantic crossing will see a different story. Good thing they plan to steam down at the tail end of hurricane season.
This morning I measured on my World Map the sailing distance from Leningrad (now St. Petersburg, were Kirovs were built) around Scandinavia to Murmansk, were they are based/repaired- it's about the same as from the North Sea to Newfoundland, or from Gibraltar to Cape Hatteras, NC, across the Atlantic. Evidently they are confident that this will be trouble free transit. My bigger concern is high temperature in the tropics and the toll it may exact on the ship and her crew. I don't know if the design was only for temperate/cold zones.

Last edited by Firehorse; September 13th, 2008 at 04:03 PM.
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Old September 14th, 2008   #36
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I was reading an unrelated news on unidentified sub spotted on Japanese waters n i found this interesting bit.

Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, foreign submarines and other underwater vehicles are "required to navigate on the surface and to show their flag" in territorial waters during peacetime.


Really?? does that mean all US submarines lurking in Russian waters are riding on the surface with their flags up for everyone to see?? I find that hard to believe.

link : http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080914/...yB0fm_0Y5bbBAF
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Old September 14th, 2008   #37
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I was reading an unrelated news on unidentified sub spotted on Japanese waters n i found this interesting bit.

Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, foreign submarines and other underwater vehicles are "required to navigate on the surface and to show their flag" in territorial waters during peacetime.


Really?? does that mean all US submarines lurking in Russian waters are riding on the surface with their flags up for everyone to see?? I find that hard to believe.

link : http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080914/...yB0fm_0Y5bbBAF
Not really. Look at it this way, you're not in trouble until you get caught.
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Old September 15th, 2008   #38
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This morning I measured on my World Map the sailing distance from Leningrad (now St. Petersburg, were Kirovs were built) around Scandinavia to Murmansk, were they are based/repaired- it's about the same as from the North Sea to Newfoundland, or from Gibraltar to Cape Hatteras, NC, across the Atlantic. Evidently they are confident that this will be trouble free transit. My bigger concern is high temperature in the tropics and the toll it may exact on the ship and her crew. I don't know if the design was only for temperate/cold zones.
You can not measure accurate steaming distances from a World Map. Transit distances for sea voyages are taken from Nautical Charts.

A transit across the Atlantic Ocean is different than a coastal transit where a ship can typically remain half a day steaming from land/anchorage.

I do not understand how you can state they are confident for a trouble free transit if they are bringing a tug.

The crew should not have any problem in the tropic environment if their ships are properly air conditioned, however, electronics (radars, combat systems, communications, etc) require adequate cooling or they get fried.

Sea water injection temperature in the tropics is warmer and will cause less efficiency in the propulsion and auxiliaries steam condensers as well as air conditioning.
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Old September 15th, 2008   #39
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You can not measure accurate steaming distances from a World Map. Transit distances for sea voyages are taken from Nautical Charts.

A transit across the Atlantic Ocean is different than a coastal transit where a ship can typically remain half a day steaming from land/anchorage.

I do not understand how you can state they are confident for a trouble free transit if they are bringing a tug.

The crew should not have any problem in the tropic environment if their ships are properly air conditioned, however, electronics (radars, combat systems, communications, etc) require adequate cooling or they get fried.

Sea water injection temperature in the tropics is warmer and will cause less efficiency in the propulsion and auxiliaries steam condensers as well as air conditioning.
remember the Navy's repair ship broke down on the Med cruise its as likely now as it was then
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Old September 15th, 2008   #40
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Not really. Look at it this way, you're not in trouble until you get caught.
Yup, the Russian, Chinese or North Koreans (i'm guessing, North Koreans are probably unlikely since i doubt they have modern subs) were just unlucky that someone spotted the periscope. Wonder who it turns out to have been, if we ever find out i guess.
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Old September 15th, 2008   #41
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You can not measure accurate steaming distances from a World Map. Transit distances for sea voyages are taken from Nautical Charts.
A transit across the Atlantic Ocean is different than a coastal transit where a ship can typically remain half a day steaming from land/anchorage.
I do not understand how you can state they are confident for a trouble free transit if they are bringing a tug.
The crew should not have any problem in the tropic environment if their ships are properly air conditioned, however, electronics (radars, combat systems, communications, etc) require adequate cooling or they get fried.
Sea water injection temperature in the tropics is warmer and will cause less efficiency in the propulsion and auxiliaries steam condensers as well as air conditioning.
I agree, crossing the ocean is different, but once out of the Baltic it's mostly NATO-controlled shores, all the way to Kola bases. http://www.infoplease.com/images/mnorway.gif

That's why they built Whitesea-Balt canal - and used barges to move subs through it, as it's too shallow.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Sea-Baltic_Canal

It was mentioned here that the USN also has tugs prepositioned just in case- does it mean their lack of confidence or just common sense?
I remember that the export Kilo SSKs had to be modified for warm/hot conditions- we will soon find out how Kirov class performs (in peace time) in the tropics! There were also Russian lang. reports that some Pac.Feet units will also go to Venezuela, along with SSN/SSBNs.

Last edited by Firehorse; September 15th, 2008 at 06:56 PM.
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Old September 16th, 2008   #42
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Post Severodvinsk class

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Severodvinsk is the first Russian submarine of the true multipurpose type, combining the ability to launch a variety of long-range nuclear missiles (up to 3,100 miles) and effectively engage hostile submarines and surface warships.
http://rusnavy.com/news/navy/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=5681
http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums...47&postcount=3

This makes sense- a semi-strategic sub that can actually hit the enemy at sea and ashore! I guess they'll eventually be the backbone of the Russian submarine force, with few old/new SSBNs and SSGNs.
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Old September 17th, 2008   #43
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Interesting. So the submarine program is more or less on track, if we are to believe that article. Does anyone know what kind of nuclear missiles the Severodvinsk is supposed to launch?
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Old September 17th, 2008   #44
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I think this class is SSGN type, so we are talking about SLCMs- modern SLBMs are longer range than 3,100 miles.
Speaking of missiles, I have some concern about the Bulava missile- have they fixed its problems yet?
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Old September 18th, 2008   #45
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Also modernization of entire Oscar-2 fleet has started ... with OMSK being repared, modernized, tested and deployed at Kamchatka ... Ikutsk is next at Zvezdocka shipyard ...




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Russia successfully test launches Bulava missile from submarine



MOSCOW, September 18 (RIA Novosti) - The Russian Navy on Thursday successfully tested a Bulava sea-launched ballistic missile, which hit targets on testing grounds in Kamchatka in Russia's Far East, a spokesman for the Defense Ministry said.

The Bulava, designed by the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology, is carried by Borey-class Project 955 nuclear-powered submarines.

Fourth-generation Borey-class nuclear-powered submarines armed with Bulava missiles will form the core of Russia's fleet of modern strategic submarines.

The first submarine in the series, the Yury Dolgoruky, was built at the Sevmash plant in the northern Arkhangelsk Region and will soon join the Russian Navy. It will be equipped with 16 Bulava (SS-NX-30) ballistic missiles, each carrying up to 10 nuclear warheads and having a range of 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles).

Two other Borey-class nuclear submarines, the Alexander Nevsky and the Vladimir Monomakh, are currently under construction at the Sevmash plant.


Testing of R-29RM from Delta-4 sub will be conducted in a couple of days testing depressed trajectory ..
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