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This is a discussion on RSN capabilities within the Navy & Maritime forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; Singaporean frigates have capability to fire Aster 30, SURFACE-TO-AIR Publication date Dec 01, 2008 The Republic of Singapore Navy's (RSN's) ...


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Old January 31st, 2009   #76
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Singaporean frigates have capability to fire Aster 30, SURFACE-TO-AIR
Publication date
Dec 01, 2008


The Republic of Singapore Navy's (RSN's) six new Formidable-class frigates are capable of firing the MBDA Aster 30 area air-defence missile, Jane's has learned.
http://www.janes.com/extract/jmr2009/jmr71238.html

There you go. I dont have the full article though.
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Old January 31st, 2009   #77
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Singapore's Formidable-class Frigate Squadron Fully Operational

Posted: 16 Jan 2009, 1400 hours (Time is GMT +8 hours)
Source: Singapore Mindef

The final two of a fleet of six stealth frigates, RSS Stalwart and RSS Supreme, were commissioned at the Changi Naval Base today. With all six frigates brought into service, the Republic of Singapore Navy's (RSN) Formidable-class Frigate Squadron is fully operational.

Officiating at the commissioning ceremony, Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean said "the frigates, with their longer range and reach, will significantly increase the RSN's ability to protect our Sea Lines of Communication. This is a critical mission as the lion's share of Singapore's trade is conducted by sea."

The operationalisation of the Frigate Squadron marks a significant milestone in the RSN's transformation to a 3rd Generation fighting force. Its state-of-the-art combat capabilities and systems will enhance the RSN's ability to protect Singapore's Sea Lines of Communication and boost the RSN's capability to integrate its operations with the Army and Air Force. Mr Teo extended his appreciation to the Defence Science & Technology Agency, DSO National Laboratories, French shipbuilder DCNS and ST Marine, as well as the men and women of the RSN for making the Frigate Programme a success.
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Old February 4th, 2009   #78
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Another confirmation by international defence journal.

Wonder why RSN is still secretive about it.

Anyone has any updates on the status of MCV,Fokker 50 MPA & PV?

Will there be any replacement for the above?

What about the S70B's, any further procurement?

Regards.
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Old February 6th, 2009   #79
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I dont think the RSN would be able to replace all its ships, since it would have spend quite a bit on the frigates.

But the S70Bs..I think it would add quite a punch to the RSN's capability.
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Old February 6th, 2009   #80
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Another confirmation by international defence journal. Wonder why RSN is still secretive about it.

Anyone has any updates on the status of MCV,Fokker 50 MPA & PV?

Will there be any replacement for the above? What about the S70B's, any further procurement?

Regards.
I don't think the RSN would be able to replace all its ships, since it would have spend quite a bit on the frigates.

But the S70Bs..I think it would add quite a punch to the RSN's capability.
1. With regards to installing Aster 30 capable launches on the Formidable Class, I don't think it is about being secretive. I think it was an attempt to be accurate, as at the time of the report, the RSN only bought Aster 15 missiles (they may have been waiting for other test results on the Aster range of missiles - just speculation on my part).

2. While 6x S70B is not enough (and given that we only have 6x Formidable Class vessels), we need to consider other factors:
(i) the limit to 6x S70B was driven by budget concerns (at that time and that the max purchase should be 10 anti-submarine helicopters);

(ii) the technology represented by the Apache Block III advance (ie. the ability to control another unmanned solutions) and USN's BAMS program (which the RSN is observing carefully). This means that in future the S70B and Fokker 50 MPA patrols will be supplemented by unmanned solutions; and

(iii) the RSN is clearly very interested in unmanned solutions via our investments in 2 classes of USVs and also our existing ship based UAV.
3. Note that on 12 Nov 2008 ELTA Systems Ltd., announced that it was awarded two contracts from a customer in the Far East (No prizes for guessing which country in the Far East). Please see the RSAF thread for more information.
(i) One $20 million contract is for EL/M-2055 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) UAV payloads. These are airborne, all-weather surface Image Intelligence (IMINT) systems, based on Synthetic Aperture Radar technology.

(ii) The second contract is valued at $19.5 million and is for Airborne Maritime Surveillance Radars for Maritime Patrol Aircraft.
4. While I agree that the S70Bs would add quite a punch to the RSN's capability, it must be seen in context of other developments mentioned above and the G550 CAEW acquisition by the RSAF.
(i) The G550 CAEW is equipped with the Elta EL/W-2085 AEW system which includes a phased array airborne early warning radar, an identification friend or foe system, electronic support measures (ESM), electronic intelligence (ELINT) and communications intelligence (COMINT) systems. The system is highly automated and uses advanced multi-sensor data fusion techniques to cross-correlate data generated by all four sensors - the radar, IFF, ESM / ELINT and CSM / COMINT. The data is combined with an automatically initiated active search by one sensor for specific targets that have been detected by other sensors.

(ii) The G550 CAEW's phased array airborne early warning radar, an active electronic steering array (AESA), operates in L and S bands (1GHz to 2GHz and 2GHz to 4GHz) and provides 360 azimuthal coverage. The system has high-accuracy three-dimensional tracking, low false-alarm rate, flexible and high target revisit time, electronic counter-countermeasures and programmable search and track modes of operation.

(iii) Please see the IAI video on the G550 CAEW's capability:

5. I'm not sure if the Victory and Fearless Classes of vessels will be replaced yet, but there is at least a need to have plans to upgrade them, if they are to remain in service.

I don't have a navy background, so what do you think of my 2 cents worth?

Last edited by OPSSG; February 9th, 2009 at 07:54 AM. Reason: Included links
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Old February 7th, 2009   #81
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I'm not sure if the Victory and Fearless Classes of vessels will be replaced yet, but there is at least a need to have plans to upgrade them, if they are to remain in service.
The Sea-Wolf class was replaced after 30-33 years of extended sterling service. If you go along those lines, the Victory class will be replaced before the end of the next decade with orders starting early in the first half of next decade. The were ordered in 1983 and the first ship commissioned in 1990. ST Marine naval yards have got something to do apart from building the new Landing Platform Dock for the Thai navy.

It may well be an indigenous solution and it may have something to do with ABM defence;something Singapore is vulnerable and currently looking into. ST showcased this new stealthly frigate design not too long ago;

http://img519.imageshack.us/img519/4...b5994e9xb7.jpg Credit: Local Mil-nut forum

However, priority would still be new submarines to replace the Challangers which are even older(but extensively upgraded); possibly the A46 submarines. They could opt to build them here with suitable technology transfers or simply have them built in Sweden.

With regards to the Asters on board the Formidables, the RSN has never stated they were carrying Aster 15s only. Foreign observers did though they had few information to rely on then. Officially, RSN simply refers to them as Aster surface to air missiles.
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Old February 7th, 2009   #82
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That said, I hope that the RSN buys the other 4-6 S-70 helicopters as well. Are these options waiting to be executed? Im wondering if the unbought helicopters are supposed to be organic helis for the Endurance class LPDs or a new class of surface combatants or ships.
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Old February 8th, 2009   #83
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That said, I hope that the RSN buys the other 4-6 S-70 helicopters as well. Are these options waiting to be executed? Im wondering if the unbought helicopters are supposed to be organic helis for the Endurance class LPDs or a new class of surface combatants or ships.
Red, thanks for the clarifications in your earlier post, they help alot!

I think we need more of the S-70Bs (at least 4 more for the Endurance Class and maybe 2 more for training/spares?) as a cheap way to upgrade the capability of this class of vessel, regardless of the number of unmanned solutions, as I tend to think of the manned helicopters as a key anti-submarine and anti-surface node. IIRC the existing S-70Bs have at least another extra-processor (beyond the normal redundancy needs), which means they can be programmed for additional mission roles or purposes (which is a very useful design feature).

IMHO, the Victory class replacements will need their own airborne organic anti-submarine and anti-surface assets. Now, at that time, the question will be: Are these going to be manned or unmanned solutions? In this case, it may be instructive to track the development of the MQ-8 Fire Scout for the USN (though I'm not sure if the MQ-8 will be the future of naval rotary wing aviation).

Last edited by OPSSG; February 8th, 2009 at 12:39 AM.
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Old February 8th, 2009   #84
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The entire region will see an increase in the usage of submersibles; in particular from China. It is the direction forward in my opinion. This should be Singapore`s S70Bs;

http://img25.imageshack.us/img25/3576/sn29cg8.jpg

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IMHO, the Victory class replacements will need their own airborne organic anti-submarine and anti-surface assets. Now, at that time, the question will be: Are these going to be manned or unmanned solutions? In this case, it may be instructive to track the development of the MQ-8 Fire Scout for the USN (though I'm not sure if the MQ-8 will be the future of naval rotary wing aviation).
Read that the RSN was interested in the Comcopter. Personally, I believe a manned solution is preferable. You do a lot more with manned solutions. Unmanned ones, while unique and have thier own advantages, serve as supplementary sensors and platforms; the same way the current Protector USVs are used by the RSN. My two cents.

Last edited by Red; February 8th, 2009 at 01:50 AM.
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Old February 8th, 2009   #85
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I missed this one out. An important new ship was launched late last year; RSS Swift Rescue, a submarine rescue ship which will come with its own rescue submersible. RSN thus joins the few navies in the world with its own submarine rescue ship and submersible. The ship and rescue equipment will not just tend to RSN`s needs but her allies/friends as well; boosting/encouraging the latter`s involvement in the region.
_______________________________________________

ST Marine launches RSN submarine support and rescue ship

Posted: 09 Dec 2008, 1800 hours (Time is GMT +8 hours)

Report by Gail Wan
Photo by Aloysius Tan

Source: CyberPioneer, Singapore`s Mindef

http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/429...brescuezi7.jpg

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) is well on course to add a submarine support and rescue ship to its fleet, with the support vessel, Swift Rescue, being launched on 29 Nov by Singapore Technologies Marine Ltd (ST Marine).

Touted to be the first of its kind in Southeast Asia, Swift Rescue was conceptualised, designed and built by ST Marine, to enable it with the primary capability of submarine rescue, as well as to fulfill other secondary roles to meet the requirements of the RSN.

Besides being highly manoeuvrable with excellent sea-keeping capabilities, the ship also incorporates a helicopter deck and unique operational spaces.

Measuring 85m by 18m, it is designed to house a Submarine Rescue Vessel (SRV) and its handling systems on board. The SRV, which is still being built in Britain by James Fisher Defence, can be lowered to a depth of 500m underwater to reach a distressed submarine.

Should the need arise, Swift Rescue will utilise a Transfer-Under-Pressure system to allow the affected submariners to be transferred seamlessly from the SRV into the recompression chambers for immediate treatment.

In March 2007, the RSN awarded the contract to ST Marine to design, build and maintain the ship and the submarine rescue system.

The 20-year services contract is expected to commence next year, when the support ship and the SRV have been completed and integrated into a complete system.

Here are more pictures;

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/1191/pict0110gl9.jpg

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/94/...squexr3hj5.jpg
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Old February 8th, 2009   #86
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Read that the RSN was interested in the Comcopter. Personally, I believe a manned solution is preferable. You do a lot more with manned solutions. Unmanned ones, while unique and have thier own advantages, serve as supplementary sensors and platforms; the same way the current Protector USVs are used by the RSN. My two cents.
The Camcopter is small enough that it might be possible to carry one or two in addition to a manned helicopter, as the supplementary sensor you advocate.
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Old February 8th, 2009   #87
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The Camcopter is small enough that it might be possible to carry one or two in addition to a manned helicopter, as the supplementary sensor you advocate.
@Swerve and Red,

I agree, I also think that developments in unmanned solutions (as supplementary sensors) are very interesting, especially the using of 2 or more remote vehicles to co-cooperatively 'ping' for adversary submarines (if I may use a non-technical approach to the subject ) or what DSO calls multi-static sonar.

I'm not sure if both of you have read these 4 online documents:

(i) Development of the Anti-Submarine Warfare Unmanned Surface Vehicle - which is a proposed[?] USN USV solution by General Dynamics.

(ii) USN's Anti-Submarine Warfare: Concept of Operations for the 21st Century. The key concept is to achieve pervasive awareness of the battlespace via integrated Joint Force ASW operations, enhanced by common operational and tactical pictures that permit precise targeting and weapons employment.

(iii) Please also see a 1998 article on 'Unmanned Warfare' by Maj Tew See Mong for an overview of unmanned solutions and a 2005 fact sheet of RSN USV developments.

The planned use of multi-static sonar is driven by the fact that it is increasingly difficult for sonar systems to detect conventional submarines which have become quieter and with low target strength. Modern navies are now placing more emphasis on the use of active low frequency sonar system as it offers a better detection performance for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) operations. In the transformation of major modern navies into the next generation force, the sharing of information between different systems for modern warfare is a key area of focus. Multi-static sonar concept presents a network-centric based approach through the use of active sonar transmitters with multiple receivers to improve target detection performance.

They look like interesting concepts to a layman like me. What do you think?

Last edited by OPSSG; February 8th, 2009 at 09:23 PM.
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Old February 9th, 2009   #88
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Thanks OPSG and Swerve for your comments.

The Spartans are already in operation and RSN has a fleet of them.

RSN currently operates two types of Unmanned Surface Vessels; the Protectors and the Spartans.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...tector_USV.jpg
Protector USV

Spec of Protector USV
9m-long Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boat (RHIB)

Capabilities:
- Force Protection (FP)
- Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR)

Equipped with:
- Camera device
- Loudspeaker and microphone
- Surveillance radar
- Mini-Typhoon stabilised naval machine gun system

Remotely controlled by operator on mother ship and powered by diesel engine

_______________________________________________
SPARTAN USV


Spartan aboard CG 64

Soldiers in Iraq aren’t the only people using remote control vehicles to investigate suspicious activities without getting too close. Singapore just unveiled a fleet of two-ton Spartan Scout Unmanned Surface Vessels (USV), which Defense Minister Teo Chee Hean said would give the city-state a high-tech boost in the battle against maritime piracy and terrorism. “The USVs allow ships to deploy such a vessel without getting the men into too close contact with a suspicious boat, which may have undesirable intentions,” Teo told reporters after the demonstration.

The Spartan Scout is a 7-11 meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat that can operate by remote control as a modular, reconfigurable, multi-mission, high-speed, semi-autonomous unmanned surface vehicle (USV) capable of carrying payloads of 3,000 pounds (7-meter) or 5,000 pounds (11-meter). At present they carry sensors, but plans are underway to test weaponized versions, including versions that could carry Hellfire or Javelin anti-armor missiles for use against targets or small craft.

The Spartan Scout was created by the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, RI, in conjunction with Radix Marine, Northrop-Grumman, and Raytheon. The craft were tested in Dec 2003 aboard the US Navy Cruiser Gettysberg (CG 64).

Among its other potential missions, the USV is being developed as a low-cost means of extending maritime patrol coverage and providing anti-terrorism force protection (AT/FP) for the fleet. In Singapore’s case, there’s also a focus on intercepts of suspected pirates. The island nation has already operated RAFAEL’s Protector series USVs during a deployment near Iraq. Singapore’s MinDef did not say how much the Spartan USVs cost, nor exactly how many Protector USVs the Singapore Navy had.

Singapore is developing the Spartan in conjunction with the U.S. Navy, who is also looking to use USVs as adjuncts to larger ships. Indeed, Nav Log notes that “Near future Scout tests are to include demonstrations of Mine Warfare (MIW) capabilities and Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) capabilities.”

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/...res-navy-0540/

Uniquely Spartan

In its continual efforts towards becoming a 3G Navy, the RSN is actively involved in research and development. It has the privilege of being involved in a multi-national collaboration with the US Naval Undersea Warfare Centre, the French Navy and other agencies in the Spartan Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) programme to develop the Spartan USV.

Started in mid-2002, the ACTD programme will create significant changes to naval warfare, especially in littoral waters. With Singapore as an island situated in littoral waters, the RSN can value-add in the programme with its relevant expertise in littoral warfare.

Together with the experts from the various agencies, the RSN personnel have been testing and evaluating the Spartan to refine its operational requirements.

This USV is armed with 'plug-and-play' mission modules - FP/-ISR, MIW, ASW and AsuW/Precision engagement. Depending on the mission modules, the Spartan can be equipped with different capabilities that are interchangeable.

According to the RSN Operations Manager for the Spartan ACTD programme, the ACTD is a manifestation of the RSN's intent to be at the leading edge of unmanned technologies.

Some of the early results of the Spartan include its deployment in ISR and FP missions "to augment the RSN's maritime security capabilities".

There are many points unique to the Spartan that cannot be found on other USVs like the Protector. One is its coalition interoperability, where a single host can control multiple USVs, or multiple hosts can control a single USV.

This is a strong and added advantage in terms of naval combat, especially when allied forces have to work hand-in-hand to counter maritime threats. Its beyond line-of-sight datalink capability is another unique factor. Used together with a UAV, the Spartan can be deployed at an out-of-sight distance from the mother ship and transmit data retrieved back to the mother ship using high-speed broadband datalink.

And unlike the Protector, the Spartan need not be remotely controlled. With way-points (various points in a route) and targets set, the Spartan can be an autonomous system.
Its 360-degree rotation camera device aids in object avoidance along its intended path.

Spec of Spartan USV

7m-long Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boat (RHIB)

Plug-and-play mission modules:

FP/ ISR
MIW
ASW
ASuW/ Precision engagement


Depending on the mission modules, the Spartan can be equipped with any of the following:

Loudspeaker and microphone (basic equipment)
Surveillance radar (basic equipment)
360-degree video and camera suite
High-fidelity electro-optical/Infra-red ball
Stabilised machine gun/missile
Mine-hunting side scan sonar
Dipping sonar
Anti-armour missile
Broadband datalink
Nuclear, radiological and chemical detection
Remotely controlled by an operator on mother ship; autonomous; interoperability among different hosts, and powered by diesel engine


USV concept
http://www.mindef.gov.sg/imindef/pub...stextimage.gif

Source: Singapore Mindef
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Old February 9th, 2009   #89
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Related Spartan development from the local forum;

Quote:
5B.3 Unmanned Distributed Maritime Awareness and Engagement System
C Reise, D Jardot, D Johnson, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, USA; G L C Ping, Singapore
This abstract describes the collaborative project to develop an Unmanned Distributed Maritime Awareness and Engagement System as it is planned in a collaboration between the United States and the Republic of Singapore. The effort is an Unmanned Vehicle (UV) project designed to provide a cost effective international solution to asymmetric terrorist tactics in the maritime environments. It is developed in response to recent world events involving swarms of small craft attacking larger crafts. These recent events have emphasized the effectiveness of swarms of fast attack craft to attack both civilian ships and military vessels. Technology demonstrated in this project will provide a capability to combat terrorists that use low-cost vehicles such as fast attack craft for personnel and weapons transportation and for weapons platforms.

The collaborative project continues work begun in 2002 between the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport (NUWCDIVNPT) and the Republic of Singapore on the SPARTAN Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD). The initial spiral of this project will integrate a Remote Operated Small Arms Mount (ROSAM) onto a SPARTAN 7-m USV. The ROSAM will consist of a three-axis stabilized gun and missile mount with two Spike missiles on the USV remotely controlled through a Weapons Management Control Station (WMCS) developed by Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Division Crane. In addition, the first spiral will develop an over the horizon (OTH) cueing capability using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) equipped with a video camera and communications link. Future spirals of this project are being investigated to include underwater-sensor cueing and buoy-based communication relays.

NUWCDIV NPT will design, fabricate and test the OTH communications link for the current spiral. NSWC Crane and NUWCDIVNPT and will integrate the missile system onto a USV and will demonstrate successful OTH cueing, command and control, and missile lock-on. After successful demonstration in the US, the ROSAM system will be shipped to Singapore for integration onto their 7-m SPARTAN USV. Singapore will launch two inert Spike missiles at targets in Singapore to complete the missile demonstration.

The USV DATT project is sponsored by the US Navy Pacific Command (PACOM) and the Singapore Ministry of Defence. It is an 18-month fiscal year 2008 new start effort with numerous supporters including; the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics/International Cooperation (OUSD/AT&L) the Combating Terrorism Technology Support Office (CTTSO), the Office of Naval Research (ONR) TechSolutions Office, and Navy International Programs Office (NIPO).
http://www.udt-pacific.com/progsession5B.asp

__________________________________________________ _______

I am thinking if it would be feasible to have wolf packs of Spartans USVs armed with Spikes operating in the littorals for hit and run attacks on large capital ships. They might sink them or cause mission kills and significant damage.

Other Spartans could be equipped with sonars and torpedoes for a tight undersea sensor net in the littorals. Comments?

In an unrelated development, Israel used Spikes missiles to bombard and close Gaza harbour;

Quote:
Israel's Navy Displays Precision Guided Missiles Fired at Gaza targets
Posted by David Eshel at 1/5/2009 8:18 AM CST

The Israeli Navy has taken part in attacks on Gaza, targeting coastal targets and boats formerly operated by the Palestinian police.

For the first time, the Navy has acknowledged the use of precision guided missiles integrated with the Typhoon weapon system. Records of the attack, published by the Israeli Navy, indicate the Israelis have equipped naval vessels with Rafael Spike ER electro-optical guided missiles. Two missiles fired at coastal targets are seen in a video aired by Israel TV.

The video depicts the attacks by the Typhoon remotely controlled gun and the firing sequence of the two missiles, one targeting a small patrol boat whoile the other hits through the window of a building on the coastline.

The 8 km-range Spike ER missile was known to be have been used from helicopters, vehicles and ground positions, but are now being used on ships, probably Super Dvora fast attack craft (FAC), carrying Rafael's Typhoon stabilized gun mount. Other videos from the attack show the boat's Typhoon gun scoring precision hits even from a rolling ship in rough seas.
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs...2-faffaff5b118
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Old February 13th, 2009   #90
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This is the first time I am hearing about the G550, but these are AEW, so it should be replacing the RSAF's E2C isnt it? Not sure if it is useful to the RSN?

I am also not a firm believer of unmanned systems. If they are really so good, all the militaries in the world would have to shut down...
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