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This is a discussion on RSN capabilities within the Navy & Maritime forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; Originally Posted by Red Hah. Trust Singapore Straits Times to toe Mindef`s line. The cat is finally outta of the ...


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Old April 3rd, 2008   #61
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RSN test fired ASTER missile in France

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Originally Posted by Red View Post
Hah. Trust Singapore Straits Times to toe Mindef`s line. The cat is finally outta of the bag it would seem.

" Singapore has a special SAAM configuration on its new frigates, combining Thales Herakles radar with the Slyver A50 launchers and a mix of Aster 15 and Aster 30 missiles."




source Aviationweek in an interview with MDBA. Go here;

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/aw/dti0108/index.php

Go to page 38-39. It includes other stuffs about the future development of the Aster series of missiles.
Hey guys, RSN just conducted the Aster missile live firing exercise in France with Singapore Defence Ministre presence. But I'm still apalled as why the media did not mention that the ships are equipped with both the Aster 15 and 30 missiles.
Just For Your Info Gentlemen.

Thanks and Regards.
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Old April 17th, 2008   #62
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Who owns Singapore`s mainstream media? IMHO, they have been very factual but they are also sensitive to regional sensitivities like thier owners.


Anyway, this is from Janes;

Jane's Navy International

Singapore Navy passes milestone en route to area defence capability
Richard Scott

Key Points
Aster 15 test-firing by RSS Intrepid was a success, according to Singapore's Ministry of Defence

Formidable-class frigates are also thought to be fitted for Aster 30, making the RSN the first Southeast Asian navy with an area air defence capability

The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) Formidable-class frigate RSS Intrepid has completed a first test of the Aster air-defence missile system off France's south coast.

A single MBDA-supplied Aster 15 missile was launched from Intrepid during the 3 April test at the Centre d'Essais de Lancement de Missiles range off Toulon.

No details of the target type or engagement profile were released, although Singapore's Ministry of Defence said in a statement that the live firing was "successful" and "marks a significant operational milestone".

Intrepid , the second of six Formidable-class frigates and the first to be built locally by ST Marine, entered service with the RSN on 5 February 2008.

Each ship is equipped with four eight-cell SYLVER vertical launcher modules, accommodating up to 32 Aster missiles. It was originally assumed that these were the SYLVER A35 variant, compatible only with the shorter-range Aster 15.

However, materials seen by Jane's suggest that Project Raven - the internal MBDA codename given to the Singaporean programme - includes the capability to fire the longer-range Aster 30 missile, indicating that at least some of the SYVLER modules are in fact the deeper A50 variant. This would make the RSN the first Southeast Asian navy to acquire a true area air-defence capability.

The Aster weapon system configuration adopted for the Formidable-class under Project Raven uses the Thales Herakles E/F-band multifunction radar to provide surveillance, target indication and missile guidance support (using an integral uplink to provide mid-course guidance updates to the Aster missile until it activates its own active radar seeker for the engagement 'endgame').

As regards combat system integration, the configuration specified by the RSN dispenses with a separate command-and-control segment and instead embeds weapon-control functionality within the ship's combat-management system.
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Old April 17th, 2008   #63
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Separately, my own guess is that there will be an announcement between now till 2010/2012 that the Singapore Air Force will acquire the SAMP/T Land Based Air Defense System. This will give Singapore a credible defence against both supersonic/subsonic cruise missiles and a stepped-up development capability against the rogue long range ballistic missile in the future; anti-ballistic missile capability is something that Singapore is looking for. They will replace the I-hawks medium range systems.


---------------------------------------------------------

SAMP/T is a land based air defense system incorporating the Aster 30 missile, designed to provide area defense and point defense for land forces and sensitive sites. The missile is effective against emerging threats, including aircraft, UAVs, helicopters and also the new generation of high speed stealthy stand-off missiles. Aster is a modular family of vertically launched air defense missiles, designed initially for naval use.

The missiles were developed by MBDA for the Franco – Italian Future Surface-to-Air Family (FASF) program, endorsed by the armed forces of both countries. Under the SAMP/T medium range area defense system, both armies, as well as the French Air Force, are expected to field the Aster 30, covering the range of 120km. Evolved Block 1 version of Aster 30 also includes missile engagement capability, intercepting Tactical Ballistic Missile of the 600 km class. MBDA is also planning to offer Aster 30 Block 2 missiles in the future, with engagement capability of ballistic missiles with much longer range.

Thales is responsible for the Arabel fire control system. The Arabel multifunction, electronic scanning radar which already equips the French Navy Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier, is capable of detecting all types of threat in the harshest environments and provides high-precision guidance in the missile's initial phase, until the onboard seeker takes over and guides the missile onto its target. The system's ability to counter ballistic threats will be made possible by the later addition of a multi-function air defense radar incorporating the new M3R technology.

The firing units comprise of truck mounted firing units, equipped with vertical launcher. Each army will use local trucks for its systems – the Italians will use Astra/Iveco and the French – the Renault TRM-1000 trucks. Each firing unit will be able to fire eight missiles in rapid succession to counter saturation attacks. The system is in development since 1997. Two systems were produced under Phase 2 contract, one for each country. Qualification tests were carried out at the end or 2003 and followed by Phase 3 contracts, covering Block 1 missiles was signed in November 2003, including 12 systems for the French Air Force and Army and six for Italy. MBDA is also offering SAMP/T system for export.

http://www.defense-update.com/products/s/sapm-t.htm
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Old April 19th, 2008   #64
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It's curious that Singapore is downplaying on purpose its capabilities (I'm talking of the silence on the Aster 30s embarked on the FFGs). It sounds a bit like the Israeli tactic of letting rumours go about weapons capability but carefully avoiding to say anything about it.
Given the very limited cost difference between installing Aster 15s and Sylver A43 on one side, and installing Aster 30s and Sylver A50 on the other, Singapore has anyway done the right thing, even if the current version of Arabel radar seriously reduces the exploitable range of the otherwise impressive theoretical 120-km range Aster 30s (to use full range you need a long range 3D air search radar, or at least the newer active phased array radars that will become operational in the 2010s, such as the Active EMPAR)

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Old April 19th, 2008   #65
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It's curious that Singapore is downplaying on purpose its capabilities (I'm talking of the silence on the Aster 30s embarked on the FFGs). It sounds a bit like the Israeli tactic of letting rumours go about weapons capability but carefully avoiding to say anything about it.
Given the very limited cost difference between installing Aster 15s and Sylver A43 on one side, and installing Aster 30s and Sylver A50 on the other, Singapore has anyway done the right thing, even if the current version of Arabel radar seriously reduces the exploitable range of the otherwise impressive theoretical 120-km range Aster 30s (to use full range you need a long range 3D air search radar, or at least the newer active phased array radars that will become operational in the 2010s, such as the Active EMPAR)
cheers
Well, the Singaporean military was set up largely by the Israelis; hence the similarities in many operational doctrines and procurement.

You`re right. The Singaporean military does assume a strategically ambiguous position on some assets/equipment which they own; particularly those from Israel since Singapore is in the middle of Asia`s "muslim central". It serves to ward off regional enemies while avoiding the kind of provocations that can trigger arms races. Also, it helps in that it does not add to the radical muslim rhetoric in the region.

The Formidable is equipped with the Herakles radar which is a targetting and search radar with a range in excess of 250km. So, the radar has more than sufficient range to control and direct the 120 km Aster 30s. Moreover, the ships will be flying under the umbrella of the Phalcon equipped Gulf-streams in our context so they can leverage on the search and targetting capabilities of the Phalcon CAEWs.

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Old April 19th, 2008   #66
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Well, the Singaporean military was set up largely by the Israelis; hence the similarities in many operational doctrines and procurement.

You`re right. The Singaporean militarily does assume a strategically ambiguous position on some assets/equipment which they own; particularly those from Israel since Singapore is in the middle of Asia`s "muslim central". It serves to ward off regional enemies while avoiding the kind of provocations that can trigger arms races. Also, it helps in that it does not add to the radical muslim rhetoric in the region.

The Formidable is equipped with the Herakles radar which is a targetting and search radar with a range in excess of 250km. So, the radar has more than sufficient range to control and direct the 120 km Aster 30s. Moreover, the ships will be flying under the umbrella of the Phalcon equipped Gulf-streams in our context so they can leverage on the search and targetting capabilities of the Phalcon CAEWs.

Cheers
Cool I'm not alone online

On the Herakles range I'm a bit sceptical. I'll explain myself. The official range of 250km is supposed to be the max range to identify a bomber-sized plane flying high (anyway, not sea-skimming). The range at which the Herakles can pick up, say, an incoming SS-N-22 Sunburn, or even a SU30s flying low and ready to launch Urans, is however much lower.
The French are working on how to improve Arabel and Herakles performance to allow for full range use of the Aster 30s on the AAW FREMMs (also known as FREDA) that will replace the Cassard. In Italy we'll solve it with the more powerful active phased array variant of EMPAR.
Regarding the use of E2C and other AEW platforms, they will certainly be of huge help. I'm just wondering to what extent the FFG can launch a Aster and guide it by using the data from the E2C. In the final incoming path the Aster can guide itself with the active seeker, but AFAIK not from the moment of launch ?

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Old April 19th, 2008   #67
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On the Herakles range I'm a bit sceptical. I'll explain myself. The official range of 250km is supposed to be the max range to identify a bomber-sized plane flying high (anyway, not sea-skimming). The range at which the Herakles can pick up, say, an incoming SS-N-22 Sunburn, or even a SU30s flying low and ready to launch Urans, is however much lower.
Yes. Im online as I can`t sleep tonight due to an overdose of sea-food which i know im allergic against but enjoy eating.

Yes. You`re right there. The detection range will be smaller for missiles as compared to larger planes. Not too certain what is the discrepancy between non stealthy F15s compared to a bomber sized plane but I reckon it would not be that much.

But I was referring to targetting capabilties of the Herakles radar with respect to the Aster 30s being used to its fullest capability. The Herakles phased array has more than enough range for that. This is dependant on the target of course.

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The French are working on how to improve Arabel and Herakles performance to allow for full range use of the Aster 30s on the AAW FREMMs (also known as FREDA) that will replace the Cassard. In Italy we'll solve it with the more powerful active phased array variant of EMPAR..
Yes. I`ve heard about it. That would be for the Aster 30 Block 1/2s which are also designed to shoot down ballistic missiles; hence the greater/higher range. We might opt for that too as it is a relatively cheap option as compared to getting a newer system to tackle rogue ballistic missiles. It is a viable upgrade option.

One of the currently available ways is to increase the power output of the Herakles so that range increases to 300km.

But it will still suffer limitations due to the sea horizon. Singapore`s DSTA is currently working with France`s Onera to address this issue; a new radar system which will circumvent the horizon issue totally. Here`s an article for your kind perusal provided by a French poster;

http://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/acti...df&docid=78372

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Regarding the use of E2C and other AEW platforms, they will certainly be of huge help. I'm just wondering to what extent the FFG can launch a Aster and guide it by using the data from the E2C. In the final incoming path the Aster can guide itself with the active seeker, but AFAIK not from the moment of launch ?
Im not sure how it works too. However, the Formidable is supposed to be a key node in a network linking all the sensors the SAF can depoly; especially the E-2Cs and its replacements; the Phalcon equipped Gulfstreams.
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Old April 19th, 2008   #68
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Wooow very interesting, I'll go and read it (and call a friend of mine who is a radar expert to do some explanations...).

Good luck with your health... I'm also allergic to squids specifically and when I eat too much of it my face swells so I imagine what you are enduring

cheers
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Old April 19th, 2008   #69
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Wooow very interesting, I'll go and read it (and call a friend of mine who is a radar expert to do some explanations...).

Good luck with your health... I'm also allergic to squids specifically and when I eat too much of it my face swells so I imagine what you are enduring

cheers
Yes. It is very interesting.

Thank you so much for your concern.
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Old April 19th, 2008   #70
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I would like to add to that the Formidables are to the key node of our entire sensor systems. It would involve more than just the ship itself and the Awacs in the air.
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Old September 17th, 2008   #71
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Beyond a discussion on the capabilities of the Formidable class, in 2003, DSTA also announced that it had developed a Fleet Instrumented Sea Training System (FISTS) and had Integrated FISTS with the United States Navy’s (USN) Battle Force Tactical Training system (BFTT) provides the two navies interoperability training capability.

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"FISTS is a live war-gaming and instrumentation system adopting the “train as you fight” concept. It enables weapons engagements to be as realistic as in actual warfare... The FISTS also allows the real-time monitoring of forces exercising at sea. The FISTS will form an integral part of our Fleet exercise regime and training curriculum.

FISTS entails the instrumentation of vessels as well as provides shore-based debriefing stations. It also enables the RSN to conduct AAW, i.e. joint RSN-RSAF exercises... The FISTS enables the conduct of simulated engagement of shipboard weapon systems against aircraft with an instant assessment on the effectiveness of their actions."
As I mentioned in my other posts on 3G SAF, the Formidable frigates are capable of area defence. Beyond the RSN's area defence concept, the US navy's AAW destroyers have a cooperative engagement capability (CEC). CEC distributes and integrates radar data from all the AAW destroyers, the air wing and the Hawkeye, to give the US principal air warfare officer an integrated detection and response capability in a manner that the RSN systems cannot easily duplicate.

I enclose below the most comprehensive write up on the Formidable class by another military nut who goes by the handle "YourFather". I've provided a link to his website.

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FORMIDABLE FRIGATE

The Formidable-class frigate has a full load displacement of 3,200 tons with its dimensions coming in at 114.016.05.0m. It features a CODAD propulsion configuration, with its 4 MTU 20V 8000 M90 diesels delivering a total output of 48,276 hp. Power is delivered through 2 shafts, with an additional bow thruster for docking maneuvers. Maximum speed for the Formidable is quoted at 27 kts, and endurance is given as 4000 nm at 15 kts. 4 Isotta Fraschini IFM V1708 diesel generators, each producing 800 kW, combine to produce a total of 3.2 MW of service power on the frigate. Unlike the La Fayette class frigates it is based on, the RSN frigate is constructed entirely of steel. According to RSN programme officials, the weight margins for the design are less critical, thus allowing steel to be used in the superstructure block aft.

The frigate design incorporates radar cross-section (RCS) reduction features previously proven in the French Navy's La Fayette frigate. These include inclined hull sides and bulwarks, low RCS antennas, enclosed mast structures and concealment of ship's boats and replenishment-at-sea equipment behind special low-RCS curtains. The RSN has made no secret of the importance it attaches to the improved survivability it believes will accrue from applying stealth technology.

The attention to Low Observables in the frigate design extends to the Infra Red region. Davis Engineering, a defense technology firm specializing in IR and Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic signature management systems, was contracted to provide IR stealth design support to the RSN for the frigate program. While Davis offers different defined levels of IR suppression based on different IR suppression systems, it is not readily observable to what extent the frigate has been equipped with those systems.

Little is also known about how equipped the frigate is in catering for other areas of LO, such as its acoustic and electromagnetic properties.

SHIP MANAGEMENT

A key RSN user requirement was to minimise crew numbers by automation of ship systems and adoption of new operational concepts and manning regimes. As a result, the frigate complement will number just 71, plus a ship's flight of 15... The bridge will typically be manned by four personnel...
...
... continued in next post

Last edited by OPSSG; November 1st, 2008 at 11:42 AM.
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Old September 17th, 2008   #72
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hopefully peaceful cab be maintain in our area...
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Old October 29th, 2008   #73
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COMBAT SYSTEM

The frigate features an indigenously developed combat system known as the combat management system (CMS). The CMS is a federated system featuring embedded decision-support aids with an embedded weapons control function allowing for tighter integration with other ship sensors. A dual Fast Ethernet data-transfer system forms the information backbone for the combat system. The CMS provides automated functionality for sensor management, track fusion, picture compilation, threat evaluation and weapon assignment. As a federated system it is more vulnerable to battle damage than distributed systems such as the US SSDS system due to the fact that federated systems have nodes through which information pass through while fully distributed don’t – these nodes constitute points of vulnerability. Against this disadvantage, a federated architecture utilizes computing resources more efficiently and is less complex, resulting in savings in developmental time and money.

ST Electronics is providing the Standard Operating Common Consoles (SOCCs) for the CMS, which are installed in the below-decks CIC, the nerve centre for all combat operations within the ship. Operations within the CIC are grouped in clusters according to their combat roles and functions. Warfare supervisors manage operations within these clusters and are responsible to the principal warfare officers. Each SOCC features dual 20-inch colour flat-screen displays.

Another ST Electronics company, CET Technologies, is providing its SuperneT ST2600 Shipboard Integrated Communication System. ST2600 builds on the functionality of the earlier SuperneT ST2300 system but introduces Asynchronous Transfer Mode data networking for improved redundancy and resilience. The system provides control and management of all external communications (including satellite communications) together with internal communications and ship's broadcast.

The frigates are envisaged as information nodes as well as fighting units. They will play flagship in a naval taskforce, acting as the Republic of Singapore Navy's 'mobile ops centre' out at sea, with a span of influence that stretches up to about 200 miles. It will be capable of receiving information from sister ships and aerial assets deployed within that range. It will then make sense of the pieces of puzzle, establish an accurate picture of the area of operations and send the information back to shore and to its Army and Air Force counterparts. As such they are well equipped with communications equipment, and 5 consoles are reserved at the back of the CIC for that purpose. France's BMTI has supplied the VHF/UHF antenna systems for the Formidable class. Each frigate is fitted with two AS 329 UHF multisource (225-400 MHz) omnidirectional annular antennas, two AS 273 UHF broadband dipole (225-1,300 MHz) antennas, and a single AS 262 VHF/UHF broadband dipole (110-500 MHz) antenna. Inmarsat B and VSAT satellite communication antennas are sited aft of the communications mast...

RADAR

The Formidable frigate is equipped with the Herakles multi-function radar (MFR). It is a single-face, S-band mono-pulse phased-array radar with its passive beam-forming lens array incorporating 1,761 phase shifters. The radar is optimised for the littorals and is intended to provide surveillance from 0 km out to a range of 250 km with coverage up to 70. Local 3D area air coverage extends to 80 km. The Herakles is housed in a low RCS radome which rotates at 60 rpm, and it has a track capacity of more than 500 air and surface targets. Peak radar power output is given as 50 kW. The high rotation rate of the radar has apparently caused unanticipated problems. A late modification to the Formidable-class frigate involved the addition of a platform under the rotating trapezoidal radar dome which was required to solve the air-flow problems encountered during the operation of the Herakles radar.

As a MFR it is capable of IFF, horizon scanning, environment mapping (ground and sea clutter, rain and jamming), accepting target cues from external sensors through the combat-management system, passive tracking of stand-off jammers, missile mid course guidance, gunfire control (through splash spotting), search and tracking. A Space Time Management (STM) device governs the signal generator for auto-adaptive radar scheduling to enable rapid switching between tasks and optimization of the time/energy budget in cluttered littoral environments. Simultaneous mid course guidance of up to 16 surface-to-air missiles is supported. With the Herakles combining both Search and Fire Control functions within the same radar (in a similar conceptual fashion to AEGIS) and the CMS featuring embedded weapons control function, one can expect a very short reaction time from target detection to launch of missile (probably in the order of single digit >=4 seconds compared to 15 to 20 seconds for many other systems).

The Herakles incorporates a number of advanced features. It is known to feature non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR) based on its use of a less than 1m resolution waveform, which allows for automatic classification of targets without relying on a cooperative IFF response from the target. This feature allows for faster reaction times which is especially important in the littorals. As a passive phased array radar, it features very low sidelobe emissions and is able to scan in both elevation and azimuth, allowing for very rapid transition from target detection to track initiation - track formation is completed within 1 second after initial detection for most targets, or within 2 seconds for highly stressing targets like incoming sea skimming anti ship missiles. Typical track formation ranges are given as 200 km on a fighter or helicopter, 60 km on a low RCS missile and 20 km on a sea skimming missile flying over rough sea. Volumetric search out to more than 200 km is done through a multi-beam approach which uses 4 concurrent beams produced from a 16-element 'retina' behind the lens to scan the airspace. To track targets and own-ship surface to air missiles a pencil beam is used as opposed to the usual track-while-scan used in other radars. Waveform optimization according to different environmental domains is also another notable feature of the Herakles radar.

The Herakles also features a high mean time between failure (MTBF) of 900 hours. Energy to the radar is generated by a set of 40 solid-state power modules (known as 'power books'). The radar enjoys graceful degradation of its performance - the loss of a few of these modules results in negligible performance degradation, with even a 50% loss of the modules leading to a mere 20% drop in radar range performance. Replacement of failed modules can be carried out without shutting down the radar. Unique to the Formidable frigate, there is also a dedicated local radar control workstation that is situated in the vicinity of the Herakles radar system. This is presumably a redundancy measure to reduce susceptibility to battle damage...
... continued in next post.

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Old October 29th, 2008   #74
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SURFACE TO AIR MISSILES

The frigate uses the Aster missile in conjunction with the Herakles radar system. The Asters are stowed in 32 Sylver cells. With the Sylver launcher having limitation of a 150 ms interval between each firing, the rate of fire (ROF) for the Asters is 6 rnds/sec. While many sources attribute the Formidable frigate with a loadout of 32 Aster 15s in 4 octuple A43 VLS modules, this information is now suspect. In 2002, DCN claimed that 12 launchers of the A50 version were bought for at least one unidentified export program outside Europe. Only two customers for the Sylver system existed outside Europe at the time - Singapore and Saudi Arabia. With Saudi Arabia’s 3 F3000S Sawari class frigates equipped with 2 A43 modules each, it is unlikely that Saudi Arabia is the customer for the 12 A50 modules in question, which in turn means that Singapore’s 6 Formidable frigates are the likely recipients with 2 A50 and 2 A43 modules in each frigate. Furthermore, in an article Jane's claimed to have accessed material suggesting that Project Raven - the internal MBDA codename given to the Singaporean programme - included the capability to fire the longer-range Aster 30 missile. With the A50 module only able to support the Aster 30 and Aster 15, it can thus be assumed that the Formidable can hold a mixed load of up to 16 Aster 30s with the remaining cells holding Aster 15s for a total of 32 Asters. This would make the RSN the first South East Asian country to acquire an area air defence capability.

The Aster missile family uses a common second stage but different boosters to meet separate roles. The second stage is called a "dart". The Aster "dart" is a long, slim cylinder with a sharply pointed nose. It has four slim, narrow chord wings in cruciform configuration and cropped-delta tail fins. The booster is faired into the "dart" body and has a broad cylindrical shape with large cropped-delta fins. Upon launch, the Aster 15 achieves its terminal velocity of M3.0 in 2.5 seconds while the Aster 30 reaches a terminal velocity of M4.0 in 3.5 seconds. Average speed of the Aster 15 and Aster 30 is 800 m/sec and 950 m/sec respectively. The Aster 15 has a maximum range against supersonic sea-skimming targets of up to 6.5 nm (12 km), 9.18 nm (17 km) against supersonic fighters or subsonic sea-skimmers and 16.2 nm (30 km) against subsonic aircraft. The comparable figures for Aster 30 are 18.9 nm (35 km), 27 nm (50 km) and 64.8 nm (120 km).

The Aster houses a MBDA AD4A Ku-band (1.6 to 2.5 cm, 12 to 18 GHz) (NATO J-band, 10 to 20 GHz) active pulse-Doppler radar seeker with high-power traveling wave tube transmitter and wide antenna deflection. The programmable AD4A is reported to be capable of home-on-jam. After firing, the seeker is switched on at a predetermined point and is laid using data provided through the uplink. Once achieving lock on, the terminal phase is conducted autonomously with the target being attacked from above whenever possible.

The Aster carries a 10 to 15 kg focused HE blast fragmentation warhead behind the equipment bay. The warhead is fuzed by a Ku-band RF proximity fuze which produces a CW pseudo-random phase digital coded waveform. Maneuverability is a key element in Aster performance and is based upon the PIF thrust vector control to reduce reaction times and lateral acceleration with maneuvers up to 12 g and Pilotage Aerodynamique Fort (PAF) using the traditional method of aerodynamic surfaces to provide maneuvers up to 50 g, giving total maneuverability of more than 60 g. PIF is used just before impact, so that even supersonic (Mach 2.5) targets performing up to 15 g evasive maneuvers may be successfully destroyed with a hit-to-kill capability miss distance of <2 m.

While the Aster missile system accrues maneuverability advantages from its lightweight ‘dart’ second stage, it pays for the additional maneuverability by sacrificing warhead size. With its meager warhead of 10 to 15 kg there is a consequent loss in its effectiveness when conducting surface attacks that similar missiles such as the ESSM and SM-2 are able to perform. Indeed, no anti-surface capability has been mentioned for the Aster, and it is unlikely to ever be regarded as being able to satisfy that role satisfactorily even if an anti-surface capability existed...

ANTI-SHIP MISSILES

The Formidable frigate’s main surface warfare punch lies in it’s battery of eight Harpoon Block 1Cs housed in two quadruple canisters. The Harpoon is a subsonic sea-skimming anti-ship missile system capable of Mach 0.75 flight. Upon launch, the Harpoon missile flies ballistically to a height of 700 m then transitions to sea-skimming mode for low level flight all the way to its target. It incorporates a high explosive warhead weighing 221.86 kg with contact, proximity or delay fuzing. In the Block 1C version, Boeing incorporated programmable waypoints which permit the missile to approach its target indirectly (performing dog-leg turns to conceal its launch platform). Other improvements include a 15 percent improvement in range to 67 nautical miles (124 kilometers), a 100 percent increase in the onboard computer memory, and an enhanced sea‑skimmer capability (the missile flies at a 50 percent lower altitude compared to earlier versions). Currently, Harpoon is credited with an operational reliability of 93%.

During the Naval Platform Technology Seminar held in Singapore in 2004, Singapore’s Permanent Secretary (Defence) Peter Ho hinted that the Harpoon missile was considered an interim fit, stating that,” these third-generation platforms (Formidable class frigates) must eventually be upgraded and armed with a new generation of anti-ship missiles that can defeat the most advanced defences".

Ho continued: "Like other navies, the RSN will have to look ahead to future anti-ship missile systems and one promising option is the supersonic anti-ship missile [but] it will need an additional capability to discriminate legitimate targets against the cluttered background of one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world."
From his post, he implies that the Aster 30 (in the Formidable) is not able to perform to its full potential with its single multi-function main radar. Perhaps that is why the British Type 45 has a different radar configuration.

Since these 3 classes of ships carry the same missiles, the difference seems to be in their radar and systems set up. Of course the Formidable at 3,200 tons is much smaller than the FREMM and the Type 45, so there are constraints on what can be put into this class of ship.

Q: Can anyone with ship systems knowledge enlighten me on 2 further questions of mine, as listed below:
(i) What are the main differences in the radar systems capability between the the FREMM and the Type 45?
(ii) How can we best employ a smaller vessel like the Formidable class, given that the larger vessels are more capable (in AAW, where 3 the Formidable class vessels is required to protect 2 Endurance class vessels)?

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Last edited by OPSSG; February 21st, 2009 at 01:10 AM.
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Old November 5th, 2008   #75
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The Herakles already have a range of 250km although effective tracking and targetting differ as per the rcs of the objects. However, that is the same for other radars as well.
Aster 30s go only as far 100km. The Herakles can certainly guide it to its maximum range. However, it depends on the detection of such targets in the first place.

The ships you mentioned are destroyers with volumetric radars with a search ability of up to 400-450km. They still have to fall back on larger targetting/fire-control
radars such as the Sampson, Apar, etc to engage enemy targets which typically have ranges from 250-300km. But again, it depends on the rcs of such targets.

The Herakles on board the Formidables will be linked to the Phalcon radars on board the Gulf-streams where the RSN is concerned. So, while the Formidable does not
carry a volumetric search radar, it leverages on other platforms.

Destroyers such as the Type 45 are great for open sea blue water operations allowing the latter to leverage on thier sensors to thier maximum abilities.

At any rate, the Formidable ffgs sensor systems
are sufficient for the RSN`s needs currently.

Last edited by Red; November 5th, 2008 at 06:46 PM.
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