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US gets worried as India proposes common Nuclear Doctrine

This is a discussion on US gets worried as India proposes common Nuclear Doctrine within the Missiles & WMDs forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; I always said that India was never dependent on US and always kept its option opens. India as a mature ...


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Old June 2nd, 2004   #1
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US gets worried as India proposes common Nuclear Doctrine

I always said that India was never dependent on US and always kept its option opens. India as a mature nation learnt a lot from Pakistan's experience of being used and thrown aside. It happend before with Pakistan and will happen once again. Matter of fact is that it is our region and only these two countries can solve their differences.

My only hope is that this proposal gets some concrete thinking by Indian government and is accepted by Pakistan and China. It will to an extent lessen up the fear of each attacking other and will prevent intervention of anyone else who does not have business here.
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India proposes common nuclear doctrine

Natwar says India, China, Pakistan can jointly bring stability in region; Islamabad says proposal needs deep examination

NEW DELHI: India’s External Affairs Minister K Natwar Singh has suggested a common nuclear doctrine between India, China and Pakistan to bring peace and stability to the region and the world.

A former career diplomat who served in China and Pakistan, Singh addressed his first press conference after assuming charge. His idea of a common N-doctrine underscored the new government’s policy of cooperation rather than confrontation.

He said the objective of the proposed common nuclear doctrine was to have a policy of the Asian nuclear powers. Natwar Singh, the foreign minister in India’s new left-leaning government, said Tuesday that India and Pakistan "are now nuclear powers and so is China."

"The three countries should get together and work out a common nuclear doctrine. This is a matter that needs to be discussed at the highest level," Singh said. The minister said this matter would have to be discussed at the topmost level of the governments involved. As far as the government of India was concerned the matter would be taken up for discussion whenever the appropriate bodies like the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) and Cabinet Committee on Political Affairs (CCPA) were constituted and their meetings held.

Natwar Singh categorically said that "the dialogue with Pakistan will not be stalled at all". But at the same time, he devoted a lot of time and energy in giving a point-by-point rebuttal of a long set of complaints made by his Pakistani counterpart Khurshid Mehmood Kasuri.

He denied that there would be any shift in India’s policy of seeking good relations with the US. He pointed out that India wanted a close acrimonious-free and multi-faceted relationship with the US and he had spoken to the US Ambassador to India about the same.

Natwar Singh admitted that there were "differences" with the US but added that these differences would not be aired publicly but rather "addressed diplomatically and tactfully". He underlined the need to further "strengthen, deepen and widen" relationship with United States. He termed as "unfounded" apprehensions that there would be a change in India’s policies towards the US and said New Delhi would like to base its ties with Washington on mutual understanding, accommodation, cooperation and consultations.

Meanwhile, Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Masood Khan told AFP that Singh’s statement on a three-way nuclear dialogue "looks like a new and innovative proposal which needs further and deeper examination."

Analysts said on Wednesday the new Indian government’s proposal was still in its initial stages and it would take time to flesh out any three-way dialogue among Asia’s declared nuclear states.

"Both the BJP and the new Congress government pursue a policy that those Americans who would hope to use India as a strategic balance to China would find troublesome," said Stephen Cohen, an expert on South Asian military affairs at the Brookings Institution in Washington.

Riffat Hussain, head of the strategic studies department at Quaid-e-Azam University in Islamabad, said Singh seemed to suggest that Pakistan was an equal player in the "trilateral nuclear equation."

"It is significant because so far the Indians have been arguing that their security concerns go beyond Pakistan and they have refused the effort by the international community to have India, Pakistan and China sit together and talked about nuclear issues," Riffat Hussain said.

The Indian proposal "will help in China’s efforts to improve relations between India and Pakistan," said David Zweig, a China watcher at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

"China wants to become a regional player, and it’s a region where it can have some influence," he said. C Raja Mohan, a strategic analyst who writes for The Hindu newspaper, cautioned not to overinterpret Singh’s statement, as it did not appear to be a concrete proposal.

"There is already an agreement with Pakistan on nuclear confidence-building measures and between India and China there is a nuclear dialogue. The question of harmonisation of these dialogues is not a practical proposition," he said.

India proposes common nuclear doctrine

Natwar says India, China, Pakistan can jointly bring stability in region; Islamabad says proposal needs deep examination

NEW DELHI: India’s External Affairs Minister K Natwar Singh has suggested a common nuclear doctrine between India, China and Pakistan to bring peace and stability to the region and the world.

A former career diplomat who served in China and Pakistan, Singh addressed his first press conference after assuming charge. His idea of a common N-doctrine underscored the new government’s policy of cooperation rather than confrontation.

He said the objective of the proposed common nuclear doctrine was to have a policy of the Asian nuclear powers. Natwar Singh, the foreign minister in India’s new left-leaning government, said Tuesday that India and Pakistan "are now nuclear powers and so is China."

"The three countries should get together and work out a common nuclear doctrine. This is a matter that needs to be discussed at the highest level," Singh said. The minister said this matter would have to be discussed at the topmost level of the governments involved. As far as the government of India was concerned the matter would be taken up for discussion whenever the appropriate bodies like the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) and Cabinet Committee on Political Affairs (CCPA) were constituted and their meetings held.

Natwar Singh categorically said that "the dialogue with Pakistan will not be stalled at all". But at the same time, he devoted a lot of time and energy in giving a point-by-point rebuttal of a long set of complaints made by his Pakistani counterpart Khurshid Mehmood Kasuri.

He denied that there would be any shift in India’s policy of seeking good relations with the US. He pointed out that India wanted a close acrimonious-free and multi-faceted relationship with the US and he had spoken to the US Ambassador to India about the same.

Natwar Singh admitted that there were "differences" with the US but added that these differences would not be aired publicly but rather "addressed diplomatically and tactfully". He underlined the need to further "strengthen, deepen and widen" relationship with United States. He termed as "unfounded" apprehensions that there would be a change in India’s policies towards the US and said New Delhi would like to base its ties with Washington on mutual understanding, accommodation, cooperation and consultations.

Meanwhile, Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Masood Khan told AFP that Singh’s statement on a three-way nuclear dialogue "looks like a new and innovative proposal which needs further and deeper examination."

Analysts said on Wednesday the new Indian government’s proposal was still in its initial stages and it would take time to flesh out any three-way dialogue among Asia’s declared nuclear states.

"Both the BJP and the new Congress government pursue a policy that those Americans who would hope to use India as a strategic balance to China would find troublesome," said Stephen Cohen, an expert on South Asian military affairs at the Brookings Institution in Washington.

Riffat Hussain, head of the strategic studies department at Quaid-e-Azam University in Islamabad, said Singh seemed to suggest that Pakistan was an equal player in the "trilateral nuclear equation."

"It is significant because so far the Indians have been arguing that their security concerns go beyond Pakistan and they have refused the effort by the international community to have India, Pakistan and China sit together and talked about nuclear issues," Riffat Hussain said.

The Indian proposal "will help in China’s efforts to improve relations between India and Pakistan," said David Zweig, a China watcher at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

"China wants to become a regional player, and it’s a region where it can have some influence," he said. C Raja Mohan, a strategic analyst who writes for The Hindu newspaper, cautioned not to overinterpret Singh’s statement, as it did not appear to be a concrete proposal.

"There is already an agreement with Pakistan on nuclear confidence-building measures and between India and China there is a nuclear dialogue. The question of harmonisation of these dialogues is not a practical proposition," he said.

http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/jun20...ain/main12.htm
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Old June 3rd, 2004   #2
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Re: US gets worried as India proposes common Nuclear Doctrine

I find it hard to see that evolving. At the military level I know Indians and Pakistani's who see each other as eternal enemies. Indian military people I know have no love lost for the Chinese, and you only have to see some of the traffic by Chinese on other forums to see that India is seen as just as much a threat to them as the US.

I can't see this getting off the ground for a long while, maybe a generation even. The military procurement processes says more for what the governments think than anything else politicians may say.
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Old June 21st, 2004   #3
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It’s right for you to say that Chinese and Indians still cradle animosity, but I feel the Indians are trying to combat the china threat in a qualitative approach, without sounding pragmatic I feel the Indians think the Pakistan threat has been or soon will be neutralized
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Old July 20th, 2004   #4
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I belive India should concentrate on it's booming economic sector until it reaches economic parity with China.
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