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Mali Crisis

This is a discussion on Mali Crisis within the Geo-strategic Issues forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; Yes, the situation is still unfolding. That tends to be the the way of operations such as Mali, in fact ...


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Old January 16th, 2013   #16
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Yes, the situation is still unfolding. That tends to be the the way of operations such as Mali, in fact i'd really be more surprised if I read an article tomorrow saying it was all sorted.

It easily may well have been to prevent him from reprisal from action in Mali, however the fact remains that - rather than put the rescue down to protect a man from reprisal from potential French action in a morally justifiable conflict* - they simply say they are unconnected.

To me, it's too highly illogical. That may be the way with governments, but generally if they've got an oppertunity to make the moral high ground and make themselves out to be the goodies, they grab it by the shoulders.

Now when put in context - and not just "perfect timing" - they most probably did do it to prevent him from being executed - oh the irony - but I still just don't get what the French Govt is up to.

*morally justifiable from a French position.
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Old January 16th, 2013   #17
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as many- underestimated islamists connections...
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Old January 17th, 2013   #18
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@Robwilliams: ur right why would they mount a rescue? To save the dude, but it does seem like a stretch to think it was connected to the Mali situation. Perhaps they're cooking up something in Somalia too?!? Anyhow lets let it rest for now, in this topic at least.

On topic: Seems like it's really going on down there! Any news on the mobilization of the AU forces? Any analyses on how effective there going to be? The whole UN plan seemed kind of superfluous to begin with IMO. Poorly trained forces with poor equipment to be deployed in september. Too little too late in any case, the situation looked imminent to me a year ago. And it seems to me the French are the only ones with some resolve.

@Atasas: You can speak of connections. I just think it's some extremist fools from the subcontinent poisoning the minds of normal rebels and insurgents with their foul and misguided cultural beliefs.
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Old January 24th, 2013   #19
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Russia has offered France help with transporting troops to Mali. This is after An-124s belonging to Volga-Dnepr, and reportedly JSC Squadron 224 have already been spotted transporting French troops and vehicles into the country. I understand that a lot of this is posturing, but given extensive participation of both the abovementioned in SALIS and NATO operations in Afghan, is it really completely impossible that actual VVS aircraft could end up involved in this? It certainly would be unprecedented levels of cooperation.
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Old January 24th, 2013   #20
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Talking

do you think the current situation in mali (and indeed north africa) is a direct fall out from the NATO operation to arm and support militants in the removal of colonel Gaddafi in libya?

Yes he was a ruthless dictator but he did say all along it was terrorism (just as assad is saying in syria) and with the mess after the civil war in libya arms was freely available to militants across the sahara including mali and algeria.

would like to here your opinions on that view
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Old January 25th, 2013   #21
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The availability of lots of modern and heavy weapons after the fall of Gadhaffi is defenitely a problem in the Sahara area.

But remember that the Tuaregs were his mercenaries not the opposition's ones...
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Old January 25th, 2013   #22
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Mali

[

The operation in Mali needs precision and determination to weed off the terrorists from the Sahel region of Africa. I wish more willing nations would be able to contribute logistical materials to finish this task and restore normalcy in this poverty ridden country of West Africa.

Gef



QUOTE=RobWilliams;258019]Not having access to a TV, recent reports about France engaging in Mali was very surprising.

Following the recent escalation with the intervention of the French armed forces in Mali, there has been the death of a French Gazelle pilot which was part of 4th RHFS. Supposedly there are currently 3 French tankers, 6 M2000D & 2 Mirage F1CR deployed in the region conducting airstrikes with Rafales held in reserve and the deployment of 'hundreds' of French soldiers to the region.

The UK has also offered the services of 2 C-17s following a French request, with suggestions from the Minister for Africa suggesting the UK train Mali soldiers. The first reported by SkyNews to be leaving this afternoon.[/QUOTE]
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Old January 25th, 2013   #23
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RAF deploys a Sentinal R1 aircraft to the region

BBC News - Mali: RAF surveillance aircraft Sentinel deployed

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A surveillance aircraft from RAF Waddington has been sent to Mali to support France's military action there, the Ministry of Defence said.

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond said the Sentinel R1 aircraft "has proved its worth in Libya and on an ongoing basis for counter-insurgency operations in Afghanistan".

Two British C17 transport aircraft have already been sent to the region.

Mr Cameron has previously said Britain will not deploy ground troops in Mali.
Anglo-French cooperation seems to be expanding too, according to the following quote

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He also said in the House that we would be looking at further French requests for additional logistical and surveillance support for this operation, over and above the two C-17s.
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Old January 26th, 2013   #24
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The operation in Mali needs precision and determination to weed off the terrorists from the Sahel region of Africa. I wish more willing nations would be able to contribute logistical materials to finish this task and restore normalcy in this poverty ridden country of West Africa.
Problem is, not many African countries have the funds to commit troops to Mali on a protracted basis, unless off course 'richer' countries were willing to foot the bill. France off course was the only country willing to take action and if it wasn't for the French, the 'rebel's would probably have taken Bamako.

The question now is what happens next? Will the Mali government and its foreign 'partners' attempt to find a solution to the problem or just hope that the 'rebels 'and 'terrorists' are truly defeated and will not re-appear at some time in the future when the French and ECOWAS have long left and is the solution going to be by mlitary means alone? And what role will Algeria play?

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...s-8457828.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...ictable-845647

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/...g-8454664.html
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Old January 26th, 2013   #25
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No need for braindead political posts that have no substance to them.

Last edited by AegisFC; January 30th, 2013 at 03:53 PM.
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Old January 26th, 2013   #26
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Gao taken, the mayor flown back in from Bamako. The airport gives another logistical base. Largest town the rebels had taken.

Timbuktu next.

BTW, the two-thirds of the area of Mali the rebels threw the government out of only has about 10% of the population. I'd guess that at least half the population which had been living under the rebels is now in (at least nominally) government controlled territory now. The area retaken for the government by the French is relatively small, but the most densely populated part of the former rebel territory. It is also the region where sympathy for the rebels is likely to be lowest.

I expect the rest of the Niger river & its towns & farmland to be pretty much rebel-free soon, but most of the rebels to survive, & fall back to the sparsely-populated, mainly Touareg, north.
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Old January 27th, 2013   #27
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The Gao area is also important insofar as the Mali Songhai and Fulani minorities are living in that area, which otherwise mostly live in Niger. They have their own militias that have been fighting against Tuareg militias in the past, often used in a proxy war by the government to contain Tuareg (and, a bit more critically, the whole thing is also fraught with ethnic cleansing ideas and all that).
France and that regiment of Chadian soldiers will need to retain a strong grip on this area lest the Ganda Koy and other militias under the FNLM umbrella regain a foothold there. Otherwise this could get bloody ugly, fast.
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Old January 27th, 2013   #28
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And why didnt the braindead US administration prevent the arms from falling in the terrorist hands
Ah, I love it when people sporting the picture of one of the biggest mass murders in history start askig questions with the sole intention of making a certain country look bad...

But for the sake of a civilized discussion I answer nevertheless. How should the US have done that? They had, apart from probably some special forces, no boots on the ground.

In the conflict rebels and loyalists plundered the weapons caches in their respective territories in order to arm every able (and not so able...) man under their command to the teeth. On Gaddafhis side this included several mercenaries besides his loyal troops.

All these weapons are now floating around in Lybia, making it one of the biggest black markets for all sorts of weapons. Apart from that the remaining loyalists and mercenaries took as much with them as they could after the fall of Gaddafhi.
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Old January 27th, 2013   #29
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Ah, I love it when people sporting the picture of one of the biggest mass murders in history start askig questions with the sole intention of making a certain country look bad...

But for the sake of a civilized discussion I answer nevertheless. How should the US have done that? They had, apart from probably some special forces, no boots on the ground.

In the conflict rebels and loyalists plundered the weapons caches in their respective territories in order to arm every able (and not so able...) man under their command to the teeth. On Gaddafhis side this included several mercenaries besides his loyal troops.

All these weapons are now floating around in Lybia, making it one of the biggest black markets for all sorts of weapons. Apart from that the remaining loyalists and mercenaries took as much with them as they could after the fall of Gaddafhi.
Well the better, and in my opinion fairer question, is why the West felt the need to intervene in Libya at all. As far as dictators go Gaddafi is far from the worst. If anything he was a known and predictable quantity. Sure he spent his last several years flip-flopping between Russia and France, but other then that there was little if anything wrong with him. Now Libya is an unstable mess, buckets of weapons are floating around the black market and destabilizing the region, and the rebel council is busy squabbling with itself. So unless this was an opportunity shot that went horribly (and predictably) wrong, what (other then political/economic interests) justifies western military action?
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Old January 27th, 2013   #30
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Well the better, and in my opinion fairer question, is why the West felt the need to intervene in Libya at all. As far as dictators go Gaddafi is far from the worst. If anything he was a known and predictable quantity. Sure he spent his last several years flip-flopping between Russia and France, but other then that there was little if anything wrong with him. Now Libya is an unstable mess, buckets of weapons are floating around the black market and destabilizing the region, and the rebel council is busy squabbling with itself. So unless this was an opportunity shot that went horribly (and predictably) wrong, what (other then political/economic interests) justifies western military action?
Whilst "big thinking" of influence is happening what the recipe would be for smaller countries, that lack of any freedom when ultra nationalist's, let alone religion based fanatics take charge?
Shame really, that in developing world human value is small and people are only cards in a game...
Back on topic- if not French (hardly possible to call them pro'western) if let alone, situation wouldn't have ever got any better for decades.
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