Go Back   Defense Technology & Military Forum > Global Defense & Military > Geo-strategic Issues
Forgot Password? Join Us! Its's free!

Defense News
Land, Air & Naval Forces






Military Photos
Latest Military Pictures

F-35_launches_Joint_Strike_Missile.jpg

us-south-korea-drill.jpg

this-year-12700-us-troops-are-participating-alongside-many-more-south-korean-soldiers.jpg

the-us-routinely-dedicates-an-extremely-large-contingent-of-soldiers-and-marines-to-the-drills.jpg
Defense Reports
Aerospace & Defence







Recent Photos - DefenceTalk Military Gallery





General African Defense discussion

This is a discussion on General African Defense discussion within the Geo-strategic Issues forum, part of the Global Defense & Military category; The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) announced it would deploy military forces to both Mali and Guinea Bissau ...


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old May 9th, 2012   #16
Defense Enthusiast
Corporal
No Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 136
Threads:
ECOWAS announces military intervention in Mali and Guinea Bissau

The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) announced it would deploy military forces to both Mali and Guinea Bissau after the leaders of the 15-member regional bloc met on 26 April. In a statement, ECOWAS said its Standby Force would deploy "with immediate effect" to "assist Mali in regaining its unity and territorial integrity," a reference to the Tuareg separatists who have declared independence in the north of the country

[first posted to Jane's Defence Weekly - Your first line of defence - 27 April 2012]
Dodger67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 9th, 2012   #17
Defense Enthusiast
Sergeant
No Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 225
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger67 View Post
Military advisers deployed by the United States in several African countries to help counter Joseph Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) have "established a good foundation and made initial progress", according to Deputy Assistant Defense Secretary Amanda Dory. President Barack Obama announced in October 2011 that around 100 special forces personnel would be deployed to help track down the LRA, which was originally a Ugandan rebel group but has spent recent years preying on remote communities in the Central African Republic (CAR), Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and South Sudan

[first posted to Jane's Defence Weekly - Your first line of defence - 27 April 2012]

Wasn't the whole Kony movement just a big scam generated via a viral video by an NGO who is actually supporting the equally corrupt and brutal regime in Sudan ?

This whole thing smells very fishy. The NGO itself is one with a very shady track record, and hasn't Kony himself been completely out of the picture ( one could say that he's retired ) for quite some time now ?
Eeshaan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 9th, 2012   #18
Defense Enthusiast
Corporal
No Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 136
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eeshaan View Post
Wasn't the whole Kony movement just a big scam generated via a viral video by an NGO who is actually supporting the equally corrupt and brutal regime in Sudan ?

This whole thing smells very fishy. The NGO itself is one with a very shady track record, and hasn't Kony himself been completely out of the picture ( one could say that he's retired ) for quite some time now ?
The LRA is not a hoax or a scam, they are terrorists with a seriously evil track record - much like that of the late and unlamented "West Side Boys" of Sierra Leone.
I have no idea what NGO or video you are referring to.
Dodger67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 9th, 2012   #19
Senior Member
Lieutenant Colonel
No Avatar
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,061
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger67 View Post
I have no idea what NGO or video you are referring to.
The NGO is called “Invisible Children”. They created a film called ‘Kony 2012’ which has been criticized for exaggerating facts about the scale of the murders and child abductions. Invisible Children claims they are using the same numbers as Human Rights Watch and the UN which, based on past results, could probably constitutes proof that the numbers are exaggerated, but not that it is Invisible Children’s fault.

It is also claimed that the co-founder appears to have suffered a mental breakdown related to the criticism of the film, and was subsequently detained and hospitalized by the San Diego police.
My2Cents is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2012   #20
Super Moderator
General
swerve's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Reading, Berkshire
Posts: 5,469
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger67 View Post
For interested folks here is a downloadable PDF - http://www.sadefencereview2012.org/p...%20Version.pdf
Looks like a thorough analysis of South Africa's situation & the current weaknesses of its military forces. The organisational changes proposed seem sensible. Reinstatement of the traditional unit structure is a good idea.

The main issue is whether the forces will get enough money to meet the demands politicians place upon them. I presume the minister of defence backs this review - but how much clout does she have in the government?
swerve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2012   #21
Banned Member
Master Sergeant
No Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 328
Threads:
On May 4th there were a number of reports that the Chinese T96 MBT scored its first combat kill, when a unit sold to the Sudanese destroyed a T-72 of the South Sudanese army.

Interesting if true for various reasons, but has proven impossible to verify. I have seen some photos of a clearly very dead T-72 in Africa but no images of the beast wot dun it!
Sampanviking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2012   #22
Senior Member
Lieutenant Colonel
No Avatar
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,061
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sampanviking View Post
On May 4th there were a number of reports that the Chinese T96 MBT scored its first combat kill, when a unit sold to the Sudanese destroyed a T-72 of the South Sudanese army.

Interesting if true for various reasons, but has proven impossible to verify. I have seen some photos of a clearly very dead T-72 in Africa but no images of the beast wot dun it!
Check for rust in the penetration if the detail is good enough. If so it has already been dead for quite a while.
My2Cents is offline   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2012   #23
Defense Enthusiast
Corporal
No Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 136
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by swerve View Post
Looks like a thorough analysis of South Africa's situation & the current weaknesses of its military forces. The organisational changes proposed seem sensible. Reinstatement of the traditional unit structure is a good idea.

The main issue is whether the forces will get enough money to meet the demands politicians place upon them. I presume the minister of defence backs this review - but how much clout does she have in the government?
Not sure how she rates in Cabinet but she is not well liked by the professional soldiers.
That said, the person who really needs to be convinced of the merits of the review's eventual recommendations is the Finance minister Pravin Gordhan.
Dodger67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2012   #24
Defense Enthusiast
Corporal
No Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 136
Threads:
Kenyan parliamentary committees urge more defence spending

Two Kenyan parliamentary committees are pressuring the government to approve spending for Kenya Defence Forces (KDF) projects. On 23 May the Defence and Foreign Relations Committee (DFRC) backed the KDF request to the treasury for an additional KES19.2 billion (USD226 million) and asked the government to fund a stalled joint project to upgrade the country's microwave communications network. Meanwhile, the Parliamentary Budget Committee (PBC) urged the government to make final payments for a Kenya Navy ship, ordered in 2003

[first posted to Jane's Defence Weekly - Your first line of defence - 25 May 2012]
Dodger67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2012   #25
Defense Enthusiast
Corporal
No Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 136
Threads:
Does anyone know what ship the previous post is referring to?
Dodger67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2012   #26
Senior Member
Lieutenant Colonel
No Avatar
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,061
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger67 View Post
Does anyone know what ship the previous post is referring to?
Which post? It helps if you use reply to post a quote with a link.
My2Cents is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2012   #27
Defense Professional / Analyst
Lieutenant General
kato's Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Germany
Posts: 2,901
Threads:
He's referring to the ship mentioned in the last line.

Which would be KNS Jasiri, an OPV ordered in Spain for which payments were suspended by Kenya in 2005. Problem was that the company building it, Euromarine, and in particular its parent company, Anglo-Leasing Finance, is considered to be engaged in fraud by Kenyan authorities, in particular regarding non-delivery, developing pressure to overprice items etc. It's also connected to Sri Lankan businessman Anura Pereira, who is indicted for corruption in Kenya.

Euromarine has in the past years repeatedly tried to get Kenya to make the final payments and take delivery, while the Kenyan MoD considers the ship itself - docked in Spain at 90% completion, partially rusted and defective - not worthwhile. There's some hints at the current round of trying to pressure them into taking it being backed by corruption too.
kato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2012   #28
Defense Enthusiast
Corporal
No Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 136
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dodger67 View Post
Not sure how she rates in Cabinet but she is not well liked by the professional soldiers.
That said, the person who really needs to be convinced of the merits of the review's eventual recommendations is the Finance minister Pravin Gordhan.
South Africa gets a new MoD.
http://www.defenceweb.co.za/index.ph...d=74&Itemid=30

It remains to be seen if the new minister will make any significant changes or if she will have much of an effect on the current Defence Review process.
Dodger67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 18th, 2012   #29
Defense Enthusiast
Corporal
No Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 136
Threads:
US Africom quietly extends its "on the ground" presence in Africa

This article from the Washington Post shows how Africom has established a low-key presence all over the continent.
U.S. expands secret intelligence operations in Africa - The Washington Post
As an African myself I find the he naivete and narrow focus of many of the readers comments interesting and disturbing.
American schools need to very seriously upgrade the quality and extent of geography and world history lessons.
Dodger67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2012   #30
Senior Member
Lieutenant Colonel
No Avatar
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,061
Threads:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam Neira View Post
The whole continent needs development. Africa has enormous potential. The USA and other nations can assist with the process.
Without (relatively) honest government you are just pissing money away. In most countries, unless you have direct control over project construction and operations, officials will steal 60% to 90% of the funding and/or materials. The problem is rooted in a culture that emphasis loyalty based on familial relationship above all else, the classic expression of which is the African proverb:
Me and my country against the world
Me and my clan against my country
Me and my family against my clan
Me and my brother against my family
Me
Ask any African and they want good government. But when you get into details they just mean ‘my people on the top taking everything, because the others are not entitled to any of it’, if you are lucky. Sometimes it seems that they will not even admit that people from outside of their particular group are actually human, and just want them dead or gone.

To impose an actual solution to the problem would probably involve:
  1. A violent takeover of the countries by the 1st world with enough firepower and an ROE to brutally discourage any armed opposition as required. Brutality will be necessary because you absolutely need to supplant the tribal justice system, which means breaking the power structure. Those in power will surrender it grudgingly, and not at all peacefully. If you are not ready to force the issue, then add a couple more generations to the time required to finish.
  2. Establish and enforce clean government and the rule of law. Then set up an education system that will teach civics so the succeeding generations will maintain the system.
  3. Gradually return the government to the local population in a 2-step-forward-1-step-back fashion, i.e. give back some power, wait for the local powerbrokers to abuse it, then break them with fines and long imprisonments. The likely sequence will be something like:
    • village bureaucracy
    • village government
    • area bureaucracy
    • village courts
    • area government
    • national bureaucracy
    • national government
    • area courts
    • National government
    • limited oversight
    • free
  4. Plan on staying there at least 60 to 80 years, until the generations raised in the old way are dead and buried. Those raised in the old way will include any over the age of 12 at the time you finally suppress the old power structure for good, so if you go about it in a the way that it is currently being done, this will more likely be 100 to 140 years, or more.
I don’t think the civilized world has enough manpower to pull this off. And I am sure that there are not enough people you could trust to run it.

So we have to go the slow route, and let societies evolve. Mostly that means helping to establish and maintain a freely elected government with a free press and a fair degree of transparency. It also requires foreign governments to keep out of the country’s politics except to:
  1. Keep the elections free and fair
  2. Keep the government (or at least the cash flow into and out of the country) transparent to limit the theft.
  3. Either maintain a minimum of civil rights or to evacuate to the interveners’ country(s) with full citizenship populations threatened by the local power structure. The current system of temporary refugee camps has evolved in a system of permanent ghettoes and must be ended. To force the neighboring countries where these have been created to absorb the populations will just create bigger problems, including future refugees being violently ejected from neighboring countries or killed in similar future crisis.
Then sit back and let the country make every mistake in leadership that they can come up with. With modern communications the people in power will not be able to conceal their thievery, stupidity, and cupidity, and will eventually be replaced by other groups that have not established a reputation yet. Eventually all the local power groups will be discredited enough that groups that think nationally will rise to power, probably in a couple centuries.
My2Cents is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:34 PM.