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Burrows100 January 29th, 2013 09:00 AM

Unattended Ground Sensors
 
Although UGS have been around and used by the US forces for around 10 years now, there is a rumour they are finally reaching a 'sweet spot' in terms of technology and affordability..thoughts?

Marc 1 January 29th, 2013 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Burrows100 (Post 258498)
Although UGS have been around and used by the US forces for around 10 years now, there is a rumour they are finally reaching a 'sweet spot' in terms of technology and affordability..thoughts?

About time... in the late 80's I had a bit to do with CLASSIC (Covert Local Area Surveillance System for Intruder Classification). Basically a 1kg brick that monitored about 6 or 8 seismic sensors that could be spread around an area (limited range of a couple of hundred meters?). It was supposed to be able to tell the difference between people walking and a vehicle. By knowing what sensor was tripped and where it was placed it gave you a cue where to look for the bad guys.

Back then, reliability was suspect and the electronics sucked power like there was no tomorrow. Each unit needed a stack of AA batteries (90 or something equally stupid) that would last less than a day. Frankly a tripwire with cans, M16 mine actuated by tripwire or a tripflare were preferrable.

I have seen some of the later gucci kit in the media being used now - solar powered, tiny in size and can send all sorts of info a massive distance - MUCH BETTER.

prkralex January 30th, 2013 06:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Burrows100 (Post 258498)
Although UGS have been around and used by the US forces for around 10 years now, there is a rumour they are finally reaching a 'sweet spot' in terms of technology and affordability..thoughts?

Unattended Ground Sensors may be rumoured of reaching its life cycle, but in countries like Canada it is used in terms of greater diversity.

It is believed with various combinations Canadian Army with unprecedented mission flexibility Unattended Ground Sensors can still be worked out.

gf0012-aust January 30th, 2013 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by prkralex (Post 258544)
Unattended Ground Sensors may be rumoured of reaching its life cycle, but in countries like Canada it is used in terms of greater diversity.

It is believed with various combinations Canadian Army with unprecedented mission flexibility Unattended Ground Sensors can still be worked out.

I'm struggling to understand your message here, please expand.

I've been involved with UGS in some form or fashion for over 7 years (and mainly priv sector developments). Ffor the US (intel agencies especially) its a very very mature tech

the last classified presentation I attended involved tech that was new to US allies in the ABCA camp but the US has been using in various generations for over 5 years prior to that, The only other nation that has a decent coherent, functional and operational grasp of UGS utility is Israel

PAHaysAZ January 31st, 2013 03:46 AM

History note...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Burrows100 (Post 258498)
Although UGS have been around and used by the US forces for around 10 years now, there is a rumour they are finally reaching a 'sweet spot' in terms of technology and affordability..thoughts?

Just a quick update on UGS; they've been around, not for ten years, but since Vietnam. I was Ground Sensor trained by the Army as a U.S. Marine Sensor Control and Management Platoon (SCAMP) member in the early 1970's. I have always liked the things and have been watching as they matured from the Gen 2 stuff we started with to the place where UGS are today. I'll be tracking this forum and jumping in where I have opportunity. Semper Fidelis.

Dan Jones May 30th, 2013 04:53 AM

The tech is mature, but the development, production and deployment process could be a lot quicker. Having said that, take a look at DARPA's Adaptable Sensor Systems program. The aim is to utilise smartphone ODM techniques to speed up the process, taking the timeframe down to 12/18 months from the current of 3-5 years.


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